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Identification and Characterization of a Rare Fungus, Quambalaria cyanescens, Isolated from the Peritoneal Fluid of a Patient after Nocturnal Intermittent Peritoneal Dialysis.

Kuan CS, Yew SM, Toh YF, Chan CL, Lim SK, Lee KW, Na SL, Hoh CC, Yee WY, Ng KP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on the morphological examination and multigene phylogeny, the clinical isolate was confirmed as Q. cyanescens.Of the 760 nutrient sources tested, Q. cyanescens UM 1095 utilized 42 compounds, and the fungus can adapt to a broad range of osmotic and acidic environments.The detailed morphological, molecular and phenotypic characterization of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 provides the basis for future studies on its biology, lifestyle, and potential pathogenicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Peritonitis is the leading complication of peritoneal dialysis, which is primarily caused by bacteria rather than fungi. Peritonitis is responsible for approximately 18% of the infection-related mortality in peritoneal dialysis patients. In this paper, we report the isolation of a rare fungus, Quambalaria cyanescens, from the peritoneal fluid of a man after he switched from continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis to nocturnal intermittent peritoneal dialysis. Based on the morphological examination and multigene phylogeny, the clinical isolate was confirmed as Q. cyanescens. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested echinocandins and 5-flucytosine. Interestingly, morphological characterization revealed that Q. cyanescens UM 1095 produced different pigments at low temperatures (25°C and 30°C) on various culture media. It is important to monitor the emergence of this rare fungus as a potential human pathogen in the tropics. This study provides insight into Q. cyanescens UM 1095 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM). Of the 760 nutrient sources tested, Q. cyanescens UM 1095 utilized 42 compounds, and the fungus can adapt to a broad range of osmotic and acidic environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Q. cyanescens from peritoneal fluid, revealing this rare fungus as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified using conventional methods. The detailed morphological, molecular and phenotypic characterization of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 provides the basis for future studies on its biology, lifestyle, and potential pathogenicity.

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Colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095.The surface and close-up view of the colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 after being cultured for four days on (A) SDA, (B) PDA, (C) V8 agar and (D) CMA at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C.
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pone.0145932.g001: Colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095.The surface and close-up view of the colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 after being cultured for four days on (A) SDA, (B) PDA, (C) V8 agar and (D) CMA at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C.

Mentions: The Q. cyanescens UM 1095 white colonies on SDA were sparse at 25°C but became dense at 30°C and 35°C (Fig 1A). The strain grew more slowly at 25°C and tended to be yeast-like with moist and smooth colonies. At 30°C, the colonies were dried, coarse, and irregular with an umbonate elevation and undulate margin (Fig 1A). At 35°C, the colonies were dried, circular with convex elevation and had an undulate margin. Red pigments were observed diffusing into the agar within 48 hours at 25°C and 30°C on SDA. The production of red pigments was more visible at lower temperatures (25°C and 30°C) than at 35°C (Fig 1A). The diameters of the colonies ranged from 0.05 cm to 0.1 cm, 0.02 cm to 0.3 cm and 0.1 cm to 0.2 cm after 3-day incubation at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C, respectively. Overall, the UM 1095 clinical isolate was found to be morphologically related to Q. cyanescens based on these characteristics [16].


Identification and Characterization of a Rare Fungus, Quambalaria cyanescens, Isolated from the Peritoneal Fluid of a Patient after Nocturnal Intermittent Peritoneal Dialysis.

Kuan CS, Yew SM, Toh YF, Chan CL, Lim SK, Lee KW, Na SL, Hoh CC, Yee WY, Ng KP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095.The surface and close-up view of the colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 after being cultured for four days on (A) SDA, (B) PDA, (C) V8 agar and (D) CMA at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696669&req=5

pone.0145932.g001: Colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095.The surface and close-up view of the colonial morphology of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 after being cultured for four days on (A) SDA, (B) PDA, (C) V8 agar and (D) CMA at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C.
Mentions: The Q. cyanescens UM 1095 white colonies on SDA were sparse at 25°C but became dense at 30°C and 35°C (Fig 1A). The strain grew more slowly at 25°C and tended to be yeast-like with moist and smooth colonies. At 30°C, the colonies were dried, coarse, and irregular with an umbonate elevation and undulate margin (Fig 1A). At 35°C, the colonies were dried, circular with convex elevation and had an undulate margin. Red pigments were observed diffusing into the agar within 48 hours at 25°C and 30°C on SDA. The production of red pigments was more visible at lower temperatures (25°C and 30°C) than at 35°C (Fig 1A). The diameters of the colonies ranged from 0.05 cm to 0.1 cm, 0.02 cm to 0.3 cm and 0.1 cm to 0.2 cm after 3-day incubation at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C, respectively. Overall, the UM 1095 clinical isolate was found to be morphologically related to Q. cyanescens based on these characteristics [16].

Bottom Line: Based on the morphological examination and multigene phylogeny, the clinical isolate was confirmed as Q. cyanescens.Of the 760 nutrient sources tested, Q. cyanescens UM 1095 utilized 42 compounds, and the fungus can adapt to a broad range of osmotic and acidic environments.The detailed morphological, molecular and phenotypic characterization of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 provides the basis for future studies on its biology, lifestyle, and potential pathogenicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Peritonitis is the leading complication of peritoneal dialysis, which is primarily caused by bacteria rather than fungi. Peritonitis is responsible for approximately 18% of the infection-related mortality in peritoneal dialysis patients. In this paper, we report the isolation of a rare fungus, Quambalaria cyanescens, from the peritoneal fluid of a man after he switched from continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis to nocturnal intermittent peritoneal dialysis. Based on the morphological examination and multigene phylogeny, the clinical isolate was confirmed as Q. cyanescens. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested echinocandins and 5-flucytosine. Interestingly, morphological characterization revealed that Q. cyanescens UM 1095 produced different pigments at low temperatures (25°C and 30°C) on various culture media. It is important to monitor the emergence of this rare fungus as a potential human pathogen in the tropics. This study provides insight into Q. cyanescens UM 1095 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM). Of the 760 nutrient sources tested, Q. cyanescens UM 1095 utilized 42 compounds, and the fungus can adapt to a broad range of osmotic and acidic environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Q. cyanescens from peritoneal fluid, revealing this rare fungus as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified using conventional methods. The detailed morphological, molecular and phenotypic characterization of Q. cyanescens UM 1095 provides the basis for future studies on its biology, lifestyle, and potential pathogenicity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus