Limits...
On the Compliance of Women Engineers with a Gendered Scientific System.

Ghiasi G, Larivière V, Sugimoto CR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: However, there has been little empirical research on gender disparities in engineering which help underpin the effective preparation, co-ordination, and implementation of the science and technology (S&T) policies.Engineers-regardless of their gender-contribute to the reproduction of the male-dominated scientific structures through forming and repeating their collaborations predominantly with men.The results of this study call for integration of data driven gender-related policies in existing S&T discourse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W., Montréal, QC, H3G 1M8, Canada.

ABSTRACT
There has been considerable effort in the last decade to increase the participation of women in engineering through various policies. However, there has been little empirical research on gender disparities in engineering which help underpin the effective preparation, co-ordination, and implementation of the science and technology (S&T) policies. This article aims to present a comprehensive gendered analysis of engineering publications across different specialties and provide a cross-gender analysis of research output and scientific impact of engineering researchers in academic, governmental, and industrial sectors. For this purpose, 679,338 engineering articles published from 2008 to 2013 are extracted from the Web of Science database and 974,837 authorships are analyzed. The structures of co-authorship collaboration networks in different engineering disciplines are examined, highlighting the role of female scientists in the diffusion of knowledge. The findings reveal that men dominate 80% of all the scientific production in engineering. Women engineers publish their papers in journals with higher Impact Factors than their male peers, but their work receives lower recognition (fewer citations) from the scientific community. Engineers-regardless of their gender-contribute to the reproduction of the male-dominated scientific structures through forming and repeating their collaborations predominantly with men. The results of this study call for integration of data driven gender-related policies in existing S&T discourse.

Show MeSH
Visual presentation of co-authorship network in aerospace engineering (left), nuclear technology (middle), and industrial engineering (right).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696668&req=5

pone.0145931.g011: Visual presentation of co-authorship network in aerospace engineering (left), nuclear technology (middle), and industrial engineering (right).

Mentions: Fig 11 provides a visualization of the co-authorship networks of aerospace, nuclear, and industrial engineers, respectively. Since the visualization boundary is limited in Gephi, the display of very large-scale networks is extremely dense (known as hairballs) and is not readable. The three specialties of aerospace, nuclear, and industrial engineering are selected because of their proper size and their distinct characteristics.


On the Compliance of Women Engineers with a Gendered Scientific System.

Ghiasi G, Larivière V, Sugimoto CR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Visual presentation of co-authorship network in aerospace engineering (left), nuclear technology (middle), and industrial engineering (right).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696668&req=5

pone.0145931.g011: Visual presentation of co-authorship network in aerospace engineering (left), nuclear technology (middle), and industrial engineering (right).
Mentions: Fig 11 provides a visualization of the co-authorship networks of aerospace, nuclear, and industrial engineers, respectively. Since the visualization boundary is limited in Gephi, the display of very large-scale networks is extremely dense (known as hairballs) and is not readable. The three specialties of aerospace, nuclear, and industrial engineering are selected because of their proper size and their distinct characteristics.

Bottom Line: However, there has been little empirical research on gender disparities in engineering which help underpin the effective preparation, co-ordination, and implementation of the science and technology (S&T) policies.Engineers-regardless of their gender-contribute to the reproduction of the male-dominated scientific structures through forming and repeating their collaborations predominantly with men.The results of this study call for integration of data driven gender-related policies in existing S&T discourse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. W., Montréal, QC, H3G 1M8, Canada.

ABSTRACT
There has been considerable effort in the last decade to increase the participation of women in engineering through various policies. However, there has been little empirical research on gender disparities in engineering which help underpin the effective preparation, co-ordination, and implementation of the science and technology (S&T) policies. This article aims to present a comprehensive gendered analysis of engineering publications across different specialties and provide a cross-gender analysis of research output and scientific impact of engineering researchers in academic, governmental, and industrial sectors. For this purpose, 679,338 engineering articles published from 2008 to 2013 are extracted from the Web of Science database and 974,837 authorships are analyzed. The structures of co-authorship collaboration networks in different engineering disciplines are examined, highlighting the role of female scientists in the diffusion of knowledge. The findings reveal that men dominate 80% of all the scientific production in engineering. Women engineers publish their papers in journals with higher Impact Factors than their male peers, but their work receives lower recognition (fewer citations) from the scientific community. Engineers-regardless of their gender-contribute to the reproduction of the male-dominated scientific structures through forming and repeating their collaborations predominantly with men. The results of this study call for integration of data driven gender-related policies in existing S&T discourse.

Show MeSH