Limits...
Performative Rituals for Conception and Childbirth in England, 900-1500.

Jones PM, Olsan LT - Bull Hist Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Manuscript records from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late Middle Ages offer evidence of the interaction of oral and written means of communicating these rituals.Certain rituals were long-lived, though variants were introduced over time that reflected changing religious attitudes and the involvement of various interested parties, including local healers, doctors, and medical practitioners, as well as monks, friars, and users of vernacular remedy books.Although many of those who recommended or provided assistance through performative rituals were males, the practices often devolved upon women themselves, and their female companions or attendants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
This study proposes that performative rituals-that is, verbal and physical acts that reiterate prior uses-enabled medieval women and men to negotiate the dangers and difficulties of conception and childbirth. It analyzes the rituals implicated in charms, prayers, amulets, and prayer rolls and traces the circulation of such rituals within medieval English society. Manuscript records from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late Middle Ages offer evidence of the interaction of oral and written means of communicating these rituals. Certain rituals were long-lived, though variants were introduced over time that reflected changing religious attitudes and the involvement of various interested parties, including local healers, doctors, and medical practitioners, as well as monks, friars, and users of vernacular remedy books. Although many of those who recommended or provided assistance through performative rituals were males, the practices often devolved upon women themselves, and their female companions or attendants.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The “empericum that never fails” in the margin of the Compendium of Gilbertus Anglicus. The instructions are for making and applying an amulet for conception. Thirteenth century. Cambridge, Pembroke College, MS 169, p. 449.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696514&req=5

bhm-98-3-g002: The “empericum that never fails” in the margin of the Compendium of Gilbertus Anglicus. The instructions are for making and applying an amulet for conception. Thirteenth century. Cambridge, Pembroke College, MS 169, p. 449.

Mentions: Second, an early manuscript of the widely known physician and medical author called Gilbertus Anglicus (Gilbert the Englishman) contains the marginal record of what came to be known as Gilbertus’s “ empericum that never fails,” according to its opening line. The instructions for making and applying an amulet for conception appear in the bottom margin of Cambridge, Pembroke MS 169, p. 449, along with clear indications of where it should be added into the main text (see Figure 2).


Performative Rituals for Conception and Childbirth in England, 900-1500.

Jones PM, Olsan LT - Bull Hist Med (2015)

The “empericum that never fails” in the margin of the Compendium of Gilbertus Anglicus. The instructions are for making and applying an amulet for conception. Thirteenth century. Cambridge, Pembroke College, MS 169, p. 449.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696514&req=5

bhm-98-3-g002: The “empericum that never fails” in the margin of the Compendium of Gilbertus Anglicus. The instructions are for making and applying an amulet for conception. Thirteenth century. Cambridge, Pembroke College, MS 169, p. 449.
Mentions: Second, an early manuscript of the widely known physician and medical author called Gilbertus Anglicus (Gilbert the Englishman) contains the marginal record of what came to be known as Gilbertus’s “ empericum that never fails,” according to its opening line. The instructions for making and applying an amulet for conception appear in the bottom margin of Cambridge, Pembroke MS 169, p. 449, along with clear indications of where it should be added into the main text (see Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Manuscript records from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late Middle Ages offer evidence of the interaction of oral and written means of communicating these rituals.Certain rituals were long-lived, though variants were introduced over time that reflected changing religious attitudes and the involvement of various interested parties, including local healers, doctors, and medical practitioners, as well as monks, friars, and users of vernacular remedy books.Although many of those who recommended or provided assistance through performative rituals were males, the practices often devolved upon women themselves, and their female companions or attendants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
This study proposes that performative rituals-that is, verbal and physical acts that reiterate prior uses-enabled medieval women and men to negotiate the dangers and difficulties of conception and childbirth. It analyzes the rituals implicated in charms, prayers, amulets, and prayer rolls and traces the circulation of such rituals within medieval English society. Manuscript records from the Anglo-Saxon period to the late Middle Ages offer evidence of the interaction of oral and written means of communicating these rituals. Certain rituals were long-lived, though variants were introduced over time that reflected changing religious attitudes and the involvement of various interested parties, including local healers, doctors, and medical practitioners, as well as monks, friars, and users of vernacular remedy books. Although many of those who recommended or provided assistance through performative rituals were males, the practices often devolved upon women themselves, and their female companions or attendants.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus