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Features of Adolescents Tuberculosis at a Referral TB's Hospital in Tehran, Iran.

Lotfian F, Bolursaz MR, Khalilzadeh S, Baghaie N, Hassanzad M, Velayati A - Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: Positive Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were seen in 60%.The adolescents aged 15 to 18 years were more likely to lose weight (p=0.001), smear positive (p=0.001), culture positive (p<0.001) and have positive PCR results (p=0.009).The type of TB (p=0.017) was a significant factor influencing loss to follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Tuberculosis and Epidemiology Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To identify the pattern of the clinical, radiological, diagnostic procedures and loss to follow-up of the diagnosed cases of active tuberculosis (TB) adolescents.

Methods: This study was a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 143 adolescents aged 10 to 18 years with tuberculosis who were admitted TB wards of National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD) in Tehran, Iran, between March 2006 and March 2011.

Results: Of the 143 patients identified, 62.9% were females. Median age of the patients was 16 years. The contact source was identified in 47.5%. The most common presenting symptom was cough (86%). Isolated pulmonary TB (PTB) was detected in 113 patients (79%), 21 patients (14.7%) had extrapulmonary TB(EPTB), and 9 patients (6.3%) had PTB and EPTB. The most common site of EPTB was pleural (14%). The most common radiographic finding was infiltration (61%). Positive acid fast smears were seen in 67.6%. Positive cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. TB) were seen in 44.7%. Positive Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were seen in 60%. The adolescents aged 15 to 18 years were more likely to lose weight (p=0.001), smear positive (p=0.001), culture positive (p<0.001) and have positive PCR results (p=0.009). The type of TB (p=0.017) was a significant factor influencing loss to follow-up.

Conclusions: The study has revealed that the clinical and radiological findings of TB in adolescents are combination as identified in children and adults. The TB control programs should pay more attention to prevention and treatment of TB in adolescents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age distribution of adolescents with smear positivity, culture positivity, PCR positivity and with the presence of cavity lesion.
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f1-mjhid-8-1-e2016005: Age distribution of adolescents with smear positivity, culture positivity, PCR positivity and with the presence of cavity lesion.

Mentions: Positive Acid-fast smears were seen in 96 of 142 patients (67.6%). The most common site of smear positive was sputum 76 (53%). The smear-positive rate increased with age (33% at ten years to 76% at 18 years) (Mann-Whitney: p=0.003) peak age was 16 years (80%) (Figure 1). Cultures were achieved in 123 patients. Positive cultures for M. TB were seen in 55 (44.7%); fifty patients with pulmonary disease, one patient with EP TB and four patients with both disease. Culture-positive rate increased with age (17% at 10 years to 48% at 18 years) (Mann-Whitney: p=0.039) (Figure 1). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test of M. TB were performed for 88 patients; positive PCR was seen in 52 patients (60%). The common site of positive PCR test was sputum in 38 patients (73%). PCR-positive rate increased with age (40% at 10 years to 80% at 18 years) (Mann-Whitney: p=0.018) (Figure 1).


Features of Adolescents Tuberculosis at a Referral TB's Hospital in Tehran, Iran.

Lotfian F, Bolursaz MR, Khalilzadeh S, Baghaie N, Hassanzad M, Velayati A - Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis (2016)

Age distribution of adolescents with smear positivity, culture positivity, PCR positivity and with the presence of cavity lesion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696473&req=5

f1-mjhid-8-1-e2016005: Age distribution of adolescents with smear positivity, culture positivity, PCR positivity and with the presence of cavity lesion.
Mentions: Positive Acid-fast smears were seen in 96 of 142 patients (67.6%). The most common site of smear positive was sputum 76 (53%). The smear-positive rate increased with age (33% at ten years to 76% at 18 years) (Mann-Whitney: p=0.003) peak age was 16 years (80%) (Figure 1). Cultures were achieved in 123 patients. Positive cultures for M. TB were seen in 55 (44.7%); fifty patients with pulmonary disease, one patient with EP TB and four patients with both disease. Culture-positive rate increased with age (17% at 10 years to 48% at 18 years) (Mann-Whitney: p=0.039) (Figure 1). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test of M. TB were performed for 88 patients; positive PCR was seen in 52 patients (60%). The common site of positive PCR test was sputum in 38 patients (73%). PCR-positive rate increased with age (40% at 10 years to 80% at 18 years) (Mann-Whitney: p=0.018) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Positive Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were seen in 60%.The adolescents aged 15 to 18 years were more likely to lose weight (p=0.001), smear positive (p=0.001), culture positive (p<0.001) and have positive PCR results (p=0.009).The type of TB (p=0.017) was a significant factor influencing loss to follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Tuberculosis and Epidemiology Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To identify the pattern of the clinical, radiological, diagnostic procedures and loss to follow-up of the diagnosed cases of active tuberculosis (TB) adolescents.

Methods: This study was a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 143 adolescents aged 10 to 18 years with tuberculosis who were admitted TB wards of National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD) in Tehran, Iran, between March 2006 and March 2011.

Results: Of the 143 patients identified, 62.9% were females. Median age of the patients was 16 years. The contact source was identified in 47.5%. The most common presenting symptom was cough (86%). Isolated pulmonary TB (PTB) was detected in 113 patients (79%), 21 patients (14.7%) had extrapulmonary TB(EPTB), and 9 patients (6.3%) had PTB and EPTB. The most common site of EPTB was pleural (14%). The most common radiographic finding was infiltration (61%). Positive acid fast smears were seen in 67.6%. Positive cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. TB) were seen in 44.7%. Positive Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were seen in 60%. The adolescents aged 15 to 18 years were more likely to lose weight (p=0.001), smear positive (p=0.001), culture positive (p<0.001) and have positive PCR results (p=0.009). The type of TB (p=0.017) was a significant factor influencing loss to follow-up.

Conclusions: The study has revealed that the clinical and radiological findings of TB in adolescents are combination as identified in children and adults. The TB control programs should pay more attention to prevention and treatment of TB in adolescents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus