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Temporal trends of alcohol and drug use among Inuit of Northern Quebec, Canada.

Fortin M, Bélanger RE, Boucher O, Muckle G - Int J Circumpolar Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Proportions were compared by chi-square tests (p≤0.05) with benchmarking of statistics for all of Quebec and, when available, all of Canada.Alcohol and drug use among Inuit increased significantly between 1992 and 2004, particularly among young adults.Alcohol users consumed significantly more alcohol per drinking episode than other Canadians in both time periods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Laval University, Québec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Alcohol and drug use is a serious health problem for many indigenous populations across Canada, including Inuit. The literature on substance use in these populations is too sparse to devise public health interventions.

Objective: The present article portrays alcohol and drug use among Inuit living in Nunavik (Northern Quebec) between the 1990s and 2000s, and identifies socio-demographic characteristics related to substance use.

Design: The Santé Québec Health Survey (1992) and the Nunavik Inuit Health Survey Qanuippitaa (2004) served as databases for this empirical work. Statistical comparisons were made of substance use variables in the 2 samples. Proportions were compared by chi-square tests (p≤0.05) with benchmarking of statistics for all of Quebec and, when available, all of Canada.

Results: Alcohol and drug use among Inuit increased significantly between 1992 and 2004, particularly among young adults. Alcohol users consumed significantly more alcohol per drinking episode than other Canadians in both time periods. Considerable cannabis use was widespread. In 2004, no significant differences in frequencies of heavy drinking episodes were observed by gender, with 60% of drug users consuming alcohol on a regular basis.

Conclusions: As in other populations from North America, this study profiles the increase in substance use among Inuit from Nunavik in the first part of the last 20 years. We observed distinct substance use patterns among them in comparison to other Canadians. Such findings, if replicated in the coming years, emphasize the need for major, culturally-relevant public health interventions in this population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency of heavy drinking episodes in preceding year (%) in Inuit population aged 15 years or over: comparison of the populations of Nunavik 2004, southern Quebec 2003 and Canada 2003.Sources: Nunavik Inuit Health Survey 2004 and Canadian Community Health Survey 2003.
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Figure 0002: Frequency of heavy drinking episodes in preceding year (%) in Inuit population aged 15 years or over: comparison of the populations of Nunavik 2004, southern Quebec 2003 and Canada 2003.Sources: Nunavik Inuit Health Survey 2004 and Canadian Community Health Survey 2003.

Mentions: When we compared results from Qanuippitaa 2004 with other Canadian populations, the proportion of drinkers reporting having had at least 1 episode of heavy drinking in the previous year in Nunavik (88.8%) was twice as high as the rates in CCHS 2003 for southern Quebec (46.1%) and Canada as a whole (46.7%) (Fig. 2). Weekly heavy drinking in Nunavik (24.2%) was 3 times higher than the rates among Quebecers (7.5%) and Canadians (7.8%).


Temporal trends of alcohol and drug use among Inuit of Northern Quebec, Canada.

Fortin M, Bélanger RE, Boucher O, Muckle G - Int J Circumpolar Health (2015)

Frequency of heavy drinking episodes in preceding year (%) in Inuit population aged 15 years or over: comparison of the populations of Nunavik 2004, southern Quebec 2003 and Canada 2003.Sources: Nunavik Inuit Health Survey 2004 and Canadian Community Health Survey 2003.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696457&req=5

Figure 0002: Frequency of heavy drinking episodes in preceding year (%) in Inuit population aged 15 years or over: comparison of the populations of Nunavik 2004, southern Quebec 2003 and Canada 2003.Sources: Nunavik Inuit Health Survey 2004 and Canadian Community Health Survey 2003.
Mentions: When we compared results from Qanuippitaa 2004 with other Canadian populations, the proportion of drinkers reporting having had at least 1 episode of heavy drinking in the previous year in Nunavik (88.8%) was twice as high as the rates in CCHS 2003 for southern Quebec (46.1%) and Canada as a whole (46.7%) (Fig. 2). Weekly heavy drinking in Nunavik (24.2%) was 3 times higher than the rates among Quebecers (7.5%) and Canadians (7.8%).

Bottom Line: Proportions were compared by chi-square tests (p≤0.05) with benchmarking of statistics for all of Quebec and, when available, all of Canada.Alcohol and drug use among Inuit increased significantly between 1992 and 2004, particularly among young adults.Alcohol users consumed significantly more alcohol per drinking episode than other Canadians in both time periods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Laval University, Québec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Alcohol and drug use is a serious health problem for many indigenous populations across Canada, including Inuit. The literature on substance use in these populations is too sparse to devise public health interventions.

Objective: The present article portrays alcohol and drug use among Inuit living in Nunavik (Northern Quebec) between the 1990s and 2000s, and identifies socio-demographic characteristics related to substance use.

Design: The Santé Québec Health Survey (1992) and the Nunavik Inuit Health Survey Qanuippitaa (2004) served as databases for this empirical work. Statistical comparisons were made of substance use variables in the 2 samples. Proportions were compared by chi-square tests (p≤0.05) with benchmarking of statistics for all of Quebec and, when available, all of Canada.

Results: Alcohol and drug use among Inuit increased significantly between 1992 and 2004, particularly among young adults. Alcohol users consumed significantly more alcohol per drinking episode than other Canadians in both time periods. Considerable cannabis use was widespread. In 2004, no significant differences in frequencies of heavy drinking episodes were observed by gender, with 60% of drug users consuming alcohol on a regular basis.

Conclusions: As in other populations from North America, this study profiles the increase in substance use among Inuit from Nunavik in the first part of the last 20 years. We observed distinct substance use patterns among them in comparison to other Canadians. Such findings, if replicated in the coming years, emphasize the need for major, culturally-relevant public health interventions in this population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus