Limits...
Coronal microleakage of three different dental biomaterials as intra-orifice barrier during nonvital bleaching.

Zarenejad N, Asgary S, Ramazani N, Haghshenas MR, Rafiei A, Ramazani M - Dent Res J (Isfahan) (2015 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis.Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05).It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Restorative Dentistry, Sari Dental School, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was designed to assess the microleakage of glass-ionomer (GI), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as coronal orifice barrier during walking bleaching.

Materials and methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was done for 70 extracted human incisors without canal calcification, caries, restoration, resorption, or cracks. The teeth were then divided into three experimental using "Simple randomization allocation" (n = 20) and two control groups (n = 5). The three cements were applied as 3-mm intra-orifice barrier in test groups, and bleaching process was then conducted using a mixture of sodium perborate powder and distilled water, for 9 days. For leakage evaluation, bovine serum albumin marker was traced in a dual-chamber technique with Bradford indicator. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis.

Results: The mean ± standard deviation leakage of samples from negative control, positive control, GI, MTA, and CEM cement groups were 0.0, 8.9 ± 0.03, 0.47 ± 0.02, 0.48 ± 0.02, and 0.49 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic view of dual-chamber technique used for protein leakage analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696362&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic view of dual-chamber technique used for protein leakage analysis.

Mentions: All the samples were mounted in a dual-chamber leakage apparatus as shown in schematic view [Figure 2]. First, the teeth were inserted from the cap end of a 3-mL plastic Eppendorf cylinder (Elkay, Shrewbury, MA, USA). The ending 3 mm of cylinders were cut previously, so the root tips passed through this part and were visible. Interfaces between the tubes and the teeth were sealed with sticky wax. The cylinders were placed in preautoclaved 10-mL glass vial tube with identical dimensions. The glass vials had been filled previously with 9 mL of distilled water. The junction line between microtube and vial was tightly covered and sealed with Parafilm (Supa Co., Tehran, Iran). The whole system was sterilized with ethylene oxide gas for 12 h. The plastic cylinders were filled with 1 mL of 22% bovine serum albumin (BSA, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA). The assembly was incubated again at 37°C and a relative humidity of 90% for 30 days (test period). BSA was refreshed every day throughout the experiment. Bradford indicator was used to measure the concentration of leaked albumin form the upper chamber into the lower one at the end of the 30th day. Bradford protein reagent is an aqueous solution of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA), ethanol, and phosphoric acid. The procedure is based on the formation of a complex between the dye, Brilliant Blue G, and proteins in solution. According to the manufacturer, albumin leakage into the solution and subsequent formation of the protein-dye complex would shift the wavelength of maximum absorption of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G from 465 to 596 nm. Color development is rapid. Only 5-min incubation is sufficient to read the samples at 596 nm. The amount of absorption is proportional to the protein present. The glass tubes were separated. Then 100 μL of test solution of the vials was pipetted into a new Eppendorf tube and 1 mL of Bradford protein reagent was added to the tube, and the contents were mixed.


Coronal microleakage of three different dental biomaterials as intra-orifice barrier during nonvital bleaching.

Zarenejad N, Asgary S, Ramazani N, Haghshenas MR, Rafiei A, Ramazani M - Dent Res J (Isfahan) (2015 Nov-Dec)

Schematic view of dual-chamber technique used for protein leakage analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696362&req=5

Figure 2: Schematic view of dual-chamber technique used for protein leakage analysis.
Mentions: All the samples were mounted in a dual-chamber leakage apparatus as shown in schematic view [Figure 2]. First, the teeth were inserted from the cap end of a 3-mL plastic Eppendorf cylinder (Elkay, Shrewbury, MA, USA). The ending 3 mm of cylinders were cut previously, so the root tips passed through this part and were visible. Interfaces between the tubes and the teeth were sealed with sticky wax. The cylinders were placed in preautoclaved 10-mL glass vial tube with identical dimensions. The glass vials had been filled previously with 9 mL of distilled water. The junction line between microtube and vial was tightly covered and sealed with Parafilm (Supa Co., Tehran, Iran). The whole system was sterilized with ethylene oxide gas for 12 h. The plastic cylinders were filled with 1 mL of 22% bovine serum albumin (BSA, Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA). The assembly was incubated again at 37°C and a relative humidity of 90% for 30 days (test period). BSA was refreshed every day throughout the experiment. Bradford indicator was used to measure the concentration of leaked albumin form the upper chamber into the lower one at the end of the 30th day. Bradford protein reagent is an aqueous solution of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA), ethanol, and phosphoric acid. The procedure is based on the formation of a complex between the dye, Brilliant Blue G, and proteins in solution. According to the manufacturer, albumin leakage into the solution and subsequent formation of the protein-dye complex would shift the wavelength of maximum absorption of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G from 465 to 596 nm. Color development is rapid. Only 5-min incubation is sufficient to read the samples at 596 nm. The amount of absorption is proportional to the protein present. The glass tubes were separated. Then 100 μL of test solution of the vials was pipetted into a new Eppendorf tube and 1 mL of Bradford protein reagent was added to the tube, and the contents were mixed.

Bottom Line: The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis.Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05).It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Restorative Dentistry, Sari Dental School, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was designed to assess the microleakage of glass-ionomer (GI), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as coronal orifice barrier during walking bleaching.

Materials and methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was done for 70 extracted human incisors without canal calcification, caries, restoration, resorption, or cracks. The teeth were then divided into three experimental using "Simple randomization allocation" (n = 20) and two control groups (n = 5). The three cements were applied as 3-mm intra-orifice barrier in test groups, and bleaching process was then conducted using a mixture of sodium perborate powder and distilled water, for 9 days. For leakage evaluation, bovine serum albumin marker was traced in a dual-chamber technique with Bradford indicator. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis.

Results: The mean ± standard deviation leakage of samples from negative control, positive control, GI, MTA, and CEM cement groups were 0.0, 8.9 ± 0.03, 0.47 ± 0.02, 0.48 ± 0.02, and 0.49 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus