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Volume fraction and location of voids and gaps in ultraconservative restorations by X-ray computed micro-tomography.

Lagouvardos P, Nikolinakos N, Oulis C - Dent Res J (Isfahan) (2015 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: Vf percent (Vf%) and location of voids and gaps were recorded and analysed statistically at a = 0.05.Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's correlation analysis were used to analyze data.Glass-ionomer and high viscosity composite restorative materials showed the highest amount of interfacial gaps.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Operative Dentistry, Dental School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: Volume fraction (Vf) and location of internal voids and gaps in relation to material type and cavity dimensions in ultraconservative restorations were investigated in this study.

Materials and methods: Forty-eight round cavities of 1.3 mm mean diameter and 2.6 mm mean depth were made on buccal and lingual surfaces of recently extracted human teeth. These were filled and thermocycled with two low viscosity composites (AeliteFlo LV [AF], PermaFlo [PF]), one high viscosity composite (Aelite aesthetic enamel [AA]) and one glass-ionomer (GCFuji IX GP). X-ray microtomography, following a specific procedure, was applied to all cavities before and after their restoration, using SkyScan-1072 microtomographer. Vf percent (Vf%) and location of voids and gaps were recorded and analysed statistically at a = 0.05. Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's correlation analysis were used to analyze data.

Results: Cavities filled with AF and PF showed significantly lower Vf % of voids and gaps than all other restorations (P < 0.05). Only for the cavities filled with AA, cavity width and depth was significantly correlated with Vf % (P < 0.05). 50-75% of the filled cavities contained internal voids regardless of the restorative material (P > 0.05). The proportion of cavities with gaps at the bottom and side walls was lower in those filled with AF and PF (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Cavities filled with low viscosity composites presented the lowest amount of internal voids and gaps. Glass-ionomer and high viscosity composite restorative materials showed the highest amount of interfacial gaps. Only in the high viscosity composite restorations the amount of voids and gaps correlated with the cavity depth, width and volume.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Arrangement of handpiece and tooth for preparation of the cavities.
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Figure 1: Arrangement of handpiece and tooth for preparation of the cavities.

Mentions: In order to prepare cavities, as much as possible on the same horizontal tooth plane, the roots of all teeth, 2-3 mm below their cemento-enamel junction, were cut and removed. Their bottom surface was ground flat, parallel to their occlusal surface. Two buccal ans two linguall cavities of 2.5 mm in depth were prepared in each tooth under air-water spray, with a diamond bur rotating in a high-speed hand piece. Two of the cavities were opened with a 0.8 mm in diameter bur (FGD0, Strauss and Co) and two with a 1.0 mm diameter (FGD1, Strauss and Co). Cavity depth was established with a length mark on each bur and cutting direction was facilitated by guiding the tooth against a stabilized hand piece with a horizontally rotating bur [Figure 1]. No special attention was given for opening the cavities with an exact width or depth, in order to have a range of cavities with differences in width or depth and facilitate their correlation with restorations’ gaps and voids. Only four cavities were allowed to be opened by the same bur and cavities of different diameter were distributed equally to labial and lingual surfaces.


Volume fraction and location of voids and gaps in ultraconservative restorations by X-ray computed micro-tomography.

Lagouvardos P, Nikolinakos N, Oulis C - Dent Res J (Isfahan) (2015 Nov-Dec)

Arrangement of handpiece and tooth for preparation of the cavities.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696353&req=5

Figure 1: Arrangement of handpiece and tooth for preparation of the cavities.
Mentions: In order to prepare cavities, as much as possible on the same horizontal tooth plane, the roots of all teeth, 2-3 mm below their cemento-enamel junction, were cut and removed. Their bottom surface was ground flat, parallel to their occlusal surface. Two buccal ans two linguall cavities of 2.5 mm in depth were prepared in each tooth under air-water spray, with a diamond bur rotating in a high-speed hand piece. Two of the cavities were opened with a 0.8 mm in diameter bur (FGD0, Strauss and Co) and two with a 1.0 mm diameter (FGD1, Strauss and Co). Cavity depth was established with a length mark on each bur and cutting direction was facilitated by guiding the tooth against a stabilized hand piece with a horizontally rotating bur [Figure 1]. No special attention was given for opening the cavities with an exact width or depth, in order to have a range of cavities with differences in width or depth and facilitate their correlation with restorations’ gaps and voids. Only four cavities were allowed to be opened by the same bur and cavities of different diameter were distributed equally to labial and lingual surfaces.

Bottom Line: Vf percent (Vf%) and location of voids and gaps were recorded and analysed statistically at a = 0.05.Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's correlation analysis were used to analyze data.Glass-ionomer and high viscosity composite restorative materials showed the highest amount of interfacial gaps.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Operative Dentistry, Dental School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: Volume fraction (Vf) and location of internal voids and gaps in relation to material type and cavity dimensions in ultraconservative restorations were investigated in this study.

Materials and methods: Forty-eight round cavities of 1.3 mm mean diameter and 2.6 mm mean depth were made on buccal and lingual surfaces of recently extracted human teeth. These were filled and thermocycled with two low viscosity composites (AeliteFlo LV [AF], PermaFlo [PF]), one high viscosity composite (Aelite aesthetic enamel [AA]) and one glass-ionomer (GCFuji IX GP). X-ray microtomography, following a specific procedure, was applied to all cavities before and after their restoration, using SkyScan-1072 microtomographer. Vf percent (Vf%) and location of voids and gaps were recorded and analysed statistically at a = 0.05. Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance, post-hoc analysis, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's correlation analysis were used to analyze data.

Results: Cavities filled with AF and PF showed significantly lower Vf % of voids and gaps than all other restorations (P < 0.05). Only for the cavities filled with AA, cavity width and depth was significantly correlated with Vf % (P < 0.05). 50-75% of the filled cavities contained internal voids regardless of the restorative material (P > 0.05). The proportion of cavities with gaps at the bottom and side walls was lower in those filled with AF and PF (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Cavities filled with low viscosity composites presented the lowest amount of internal voids and gaps. Glass-ionomer and high viscosity composite restorative materials showed the highest amount of interfacial gaps. Only in the high viscosity composite restorations the amount of voids and gaps correlated with the cavity depth, width and volume.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus