Limits...
Lactobacilli with probiotic potential in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

Assefa S, Ahles K, Bigelow S, Curtis JT, Köhler GA - Gut Pathog (2015)

Bottom Line: The highly social prairie voles are an excellent model system to study the effects of environmental factors on social behavior.This study demonstrates that lactobacilli with probiotic potential are present in the vole intestine.The Lactobacillus isolates identified in this study will provide a basis for the investigation of probiotic effects in the vole behavioral model system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, 1111 West 17th Street, Tulsa, OK 74107 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent research suggests integration of the intestinal microbiota in gut-brain communication which could lead to new approaches to treat neurological disorders. The highly social prairie voles are an excellent model system to study the effects of environmental factors on social behavior. For future studies on the role of probiotics in ameliorating disorders with social withdrawal symptoms, we report the characterization of intestinal Lactobacillus isolates with probiotic potential from voles.

Methods and results: 30 bacterial strains were isolated from the vole intestine and found to be distinct but closely related to Lactobacillus johnsonii using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA fingerprinting. In vitro characterizations including acid and bile tolerance, antimicrobial effects, antibiotic susceptibility, and adherence to intestinal epithelial cells were performed to assess the probiotic potential of selected strains. Since previous studies revealed that mercury ingestion triggers social deficits in voles, mercury resistance of the probiotic candidates was evaluated which could be an important factor in preventing/treating these behavioral changes.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that lactobacilli with probiotic potential are present in the vole intestine. The Lactobacillus isolates identified in this study will provide a basis for the investigation of probiotic effects in the vole behavioral model system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adhesion of vole lactobacilli to Caco-2 epithelial cells. Assay results are depicted for the five most promising probiotic candidate strains as well as ATCC 33200 (Lj) and LGG as controls. Adhesion is expressed as the mean percentage of bacteria that bound to Caco-2 cell monolayers relative to the amount of bacteria added. The number of bacterial CFUs added varied between 1.5 × 108 to 3.4 × 108 CFUs mL−1. Each value represents the mean of triplicate measurements; error bars indicate the standard deviation.*P < 0.05 (one-way ANOVA)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696317&req=5

Fig8: Adhesion of vole lactobacilli to Caco-2 epithelial cells. Assay results are depicted for the five most promising probiotic candidate strains as well as ATCC 33200 (Lj) and LGG as controls. Adhesion is expressed as the mean percentage of bacteria that bound to Caco-2 cell monolayers relative to the amount of bacteria added. The number of bacterial CFUs added varied between 1.5 × 108 to 3.4 × 108 CFUs mL−1. Each value represents the mean of triplicate measurements; error bars indicate the standard deviation.*P < 0.05 (one-way ANOVA)

Mentions: The five most promising probiotic candidates were examined for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Three strains showed strong adherence levels to human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells, similar to the adherence observed with the human intestinal probiotic L. rhamnosus GG and L. johnsonii ATCC 33200 (Fig. 8). Strain PV012 was the most adherent strain in the assay since approximately 7.7 ± 0.1 % of the added bacteria bound to Caco-2 cells. PV018 was the least adherent (1.3 ± 0.2 %). The adhesion of PV018 and PV017 was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than the adhesion of PV012, PV019, PV039, ATCC 33200, and LGG.Fig. 8


Lactobacilli with probiotic potential in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

Assefa S, Ahles K, Bigelow S, Curtis JT, Köhler GA - Gut Pathog (2015)

Adhesion of vole lactobacilli to Caco-2 epithelial cells. Assay results are depicted for the five most promising probiotic candidate strains as well as ATCC 33200 (Lj) and LGG as controls. Adhesion is expressed as the mean percentage of bacteria that bound to Caco-2 cell monolayers relative to the amount of bacteria added. The number of bacterial CFUs added varied between 1.5 × 108 to 3.4 × 108 CFUs mL−1. Each value represents the mean of triplicate measurements; error bars indicate the standard deviation.*P < 0.05 (one-way ANOVA)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696317&req=5

Fig8: Adhesion of vole lactobacilli to Caco-2 epithelial cells. Assay results are depicted for the five most promising probiotic candidate strains as well as ATCC 33200 (Lj) and LGG as controls. Adhesion is expressed as the mean percentage of bacteria that bound to Caco-2 cell monolayers relative to the amount of bacteria added. The number of bacterial CFUs added varied between 1.5 × 108 to 3.4 × 108 CFUs mL−1. Each value represents the mean of triplicate measurements; error bars indicate the standard deviation.*P < 0.05 (one-way ANOVA)
Mentions: The five most promising probiotic candidates were examined for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Three strains showed strong adherence levels to human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells, similar to the adherence observed with the human intestinal probiotic L. rhamnosus GG and L. johnsonii ATCC 33200 (Fig. 8). Strain PV012 was the most adherent strain in the assay since approximately 7.7 ± 0.1 % of the added bacteria bound to Caco-2 cells. PV018 was the least adherent (1.3 ± 0.2 %). The adhesion of PV018 and PV017 was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than the adhesion of PV012, PV019, PV039, ATCC 33200, and LGG.Fig. 8

Bottom Line: The highly social prairie voles are an excellent model system to study the effects of environmental factors on social behavior.This study demonstrates that lactobacilli with probiotic potential are present in the vole intestine.The Lactobacillus isolates identified in this study will provide a basis for the investigation of probiotic effects in the vole behavioral model system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, 1111 West 17th Street, Tulsa, OK 74107 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent research suggests integration of the intestinal microbiota in gut-brain communication which could lead to new approaches to treat neurological disorders. The highly social prairie voles are an excellent model system to study the effects of environmental factors on social behavior. For future studies on the role of probiotics in ameliorating disorders with social withdrawal symptoms, we report the characterization of intestinal Lactobacillus isolates with probiotic potential from voles.

Methods and results: 30 bacterial strains were isolated from the vole intestine and found to be distinct but closely related to Lactobacillus johnsonii using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA fingerprinting. In vitro characterizations including acid and bile tolerance, antimicrobial effects, antibiotic susceptibility, and adherence to intestinal epithelial cells were performed to assess the probiotic potential of selected strains. Since previous studies revealed that mercury ingestion triggers social deficits in voles, mercury resistance of the probiotic candidates was evaluated which could be an important factor in preventing/treating these behavioral changes.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that lactobacilli with probiotic potential are present in the vole intestine. The Lactobacillus isolates identified in this study will provide a basis for the investigation of probiotic effects in the vole behavioral model system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus