Limits...
Stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest or intraoral jaw bone.

Kang YH, Kim HM, Byun JH, Kim UK, Sung IY, Cho YC, Park BW - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed.Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates.These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Institute of Health Science, Jinju, 660-702, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Jaw bone and iliac bone are the most frequently used autologous bone sources for dental implant placement in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges. However, the comparative long-term stability of these two autologous bone grafts have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from either the iliac crest or the intraoral jaw bone for severely atrophic alveolar ridges.

Methods: In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed. We compared the residual increased bone height of the grafted bone, peri-implantitis incidence, radiological density in newly generated bones (HU values), and implant stability using resonance frequency analysis (ISQ values) between the two autologous bone graft groups.

Results: Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates. However, the grafted iliac bone exhibited more prompt vertical loss than the jaw bone, in particular, the largest vertical bone reduction was observed within 6 months after the bone graft. In contrast, the jaw bone graft group exhibited a slower vertical bone resorption rate and a lower incidence of peri-implantitis during long-term follow-up than the iliac bone graft group.

Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Long-term panoramic evaluation of simultaneous dental implantation cases with autologous iliac bone (a) and intraoral jaw bone grafts (b). a Dental implants are placed in both maxillary posterior ridges with subantral inlay-type iliac block and particulate bone graft. In panoramic analysis, the augmented alveolar bone heights in both maxillary posterior ridges (arrows in T3) are remarkably vertically reduced at the 5.5-year follow-up (arrows in T5). In particular, the radiograph of T5 (5.5 years postoperatively) shows coincidental bone resorption in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows) compared with radiographs at T1 or T3, indicating that the long-term grafted bone resorption could be related to the shrinkage volume of grafted iliac bone as well as peri-implantitis. b A case of intraoral jaw bone graft and simultaneous implantation. Implant fixtures are simultaneously placed and jaw bone is grafted onto the sinus floor (subantral inlay-type) and on the exposed fixtures in lower alveolar ridges (onlay-type). The grafted jaw bone is well maintained and shows a lesser vertical bone reductive pattern than the iliac bone graft in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696287&req=5

Fig3: Long-term panoramic evaluation of simultaneous dental implantation cases with autologous iliac bone (a) and intraoral jaw bone grafts (b). a Dental implants are placed in both maxillary posterior ridges with subantral inlay-type iliac block and particulate bone graft. In panoramic analysis, the augmented alveolar bone heights in both maxillary posterior ridges (arrows in T3) are remarkably vertically reduced at the 5.5-year follow-up (arrows in T5). In particular, the radiograph of T5 (5.5 years postoperatively) shows coincidental bone resorption in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows) compared with radiographs at T1 or T3, indicating that the long-term grafted bone resorption could be related to the shrinkage volume of grafted iliac bone as well as peri-implantitis. b A case of intraoral jaw bone graft and simultaneous implantation. Implant fixtures are simultaneously placed and jaw bone is grafted onto the sinus floor (subantral inlay-type) and on the exposed fixtures in lower alveolar ridges (onlay-type). The grafted jaw bone is well maintained and shows a lesser vertical bone reductive pattern than the iliac bone graft in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows)

Mentions: We evaluated preoperative and the sequential postoperative radiological views to calculate the residual vertical bone height of each group. Routine panoramic views were taken immediately before surgery (T0), immediately after implant placement and bone grafting (T1), immediately before reopening the placed fixtures (second implant surgery) at 5 to 6 months after bone graft (T2), and then annually at the follow-up periods (T3 to T5): T3, between 1 and 2 years after surgery; T4, between 2 and 3 years after surgery; and T5, more than 3 years after surgery (Fig. 2a). In serial panoramic views of the inlay- and onlay-type bone graft sites, the vertical alveolar bone height was measured and calculated, and the residual increased bone height was compared with the preoperative vertical alveolar bone height (T0) (Fig. 3). The ratio of residual grafted bone height was calculated at T5 by comparing the initial increased bone height at T1: [(remaining grafted bone height at T5)∕(initial increased bone height at T1) × 100] (Table 2). Dental computed tomography (CT) scans (Philips Medical System, Ohio, USA) were taken in 25 consenting patients (15 in Group 1 and 10 in Group 2) 1 year postoperatively (T3) (Fig. 4). From the CT scans, radiological intensities were analyzed by measurements of HU values in the newly generated bones using image analyzing software (Syngo CT 2004A, Siemens, Munich, Germany) and compared between the two groups.Fig. 2


Stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest or intraoral jaw bone.

Kang YH, Kim HM, Byun JH, Kim UK, Sung IY, Cho YC, Park BW - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Long-term panoramic evaluation of simultaneous dental implantation cases with autologous iliac bone (a) and intraoral jaw bone grafts (b). a Dental implants are placed in both maxillary posterior ridges with subantral inlay-type iliac block and particulate bone graft. In panoramic analysis, the augmented alveolar bone heights in both maxillary posterior ridges (arrows in T3) are remarkably vertically reduced at the 5.5-year follow-up (arrows in T5). In particular, the radiograph of T5 (5.5 years postoperatively) shows coincidental bone resorption in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows) compared with radiographs at T1 or T3, indicating that the long-term grafted bone resorption could be related to the shrinkage volume of grafted iliac bone as well as peri-implantitis. b A case of intraoral jaw bone graft and simultaneous implantation. Implant fixtures are simultaneously placed and jaw bone is grafted onto the sinus floor (subantral inlay-type) and on the exposed fixtures in lower alveolar ridges (onlay-type). The grafted jaw bone is well maintained and shows a lesser vertical bone reductive pattern than the iliac bone graft in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696287&req=5

Fig3: Long-term panoramic evaluation of simultaneous dental implantation cases with autologous iliac bone (a) and intraoral jaw bone grafts (b). a Dental implants are placed in both maxillary posterior ridges with subantral inlay-type iliac block and particulate bone graft. In panoramic analysis, the augmented alveolar bone heights in both maxillary posterior ridges (arrows in T3) are remarkably vertically reduced at the 5.5-year follow-up (arrows in T5). In particular, the radiograph of T5 (5.5 years postoperatively) shows coincidental bone resorption in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows) compared with radiographs at T1 or T3, indicating that the long-term grafted bone resorption could be related to the shrinkage volume of grafted iliac bone as well as peri-implantitis. b A case of intraoral jaw bone graft and simultaneous implantation. Implant fixtures are simultaneously placed and jaw bone is grafted onto the sinus floor (subantral inlay-type) and on the exposed fixtures in lower alveolar ridges (onlay-type). The grafted jaw bone is well maintained and shows a lesser vertical bone reductive pattern than the iliac bone graft in the marginal alveolar bone (open arrows) and sinus floor (closed arrows)
Mentions: We evaluated preoperative and the sequential postoperative radiological views to calculate the residual vertical bone height of each group. Routine panoramic views were taken immediately before surgery (T0), immediately after implant placement and bone grafting (T1), immediately before reopening the placed fixtures (second implant surgery) at 5 to 6 months after bone graft (T2), and then annually at the follow-up periods (T3 to T5): T3, between 1 and 2 years after surgery; T4, between 2 and 3 years after surgery; and T5, more than 3 years after surgery (Fig. 2a). In serial panoramic views of the inlay- and onlay-type bone graft sites, the vertical alveolar bone height was measured and calculated, and the residual increased bone height was compared with the preoperative vertical alveolar bone height (T0) (Fig. 3). The ratio of residual grafted bone height was calculated at T5 by comparing the initial increased bone height at T1: [(remaining grafted bone height at T5)∕(initial increased bone height at T1) × 100] (Table 2). Dental computed tomography (CT) scans (Philips Medical System, Ohio, USA) were taken in 25 consenting patients (15 in Group 1 and 10 in Group 2) 1 year postoperatively (T3) (Fig. 4). From the CT scans, radiological intensities were analyzed by measurements of HU values in the newly generated bones using image analyzing software (Syngo CT 2004A, Siemens, Munich, Germany) and compared between the two groups.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed.Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates.These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Institute of Health Science, Jinju, 660-702, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Jaw bone and iliac bone are the most frequently used autologous bone sources for dental implant placement in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges. However, the comparative long-term stability of these two autologous bone grafts have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from either the iliac crest or the intraoral jaw bone for severely atrophic alveolar ridges.

Methods: In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed. We compared the residual increased bone height of the grafted bone, peri-implantitis incidence, radiological density in newly generated bones (HU values), and implant stability using resonance frequency analysis (ISQ values) between the two autologous bone graft groups.

Results: Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates. However, the grafted iliac bone exhibited more prompt vertical loss than the jaw bone, in particular, the largest vertical bone reduction was observed within 6 months after the bone graft. In contrast, the jaw bone graft group exhibited a slower vertical bone resorption rate and a lower incidence of peri-implantitis during long-term follow-up than the iliac bone graft group.

Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus