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Detection of bacteria in middle ear effusions based on the presence of allergy: does allergy augment bacterial infection in the middle ear?

Kim WJ, Kim BG, Chang KH, Oh JH - J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall detection rates and those for each species were compared between the two groups.S. pneumoniae was detected in 27 samples (50 %), H. influenzae in 17 samples (31.4 %), and M. catarrhalis in 9 samples (16.6 %).The rate of bacteria detection in middle ear effusions did not differ between allergic and non-allergic children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. kwjent@catholic.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bacterial infection, Eustachian tube dysfunction, allergies, and immunologic factors are major causes of otitis media with effusion (OME). However, the exact pathogenesis of OME is still unclear. This study evaluated whether allergy influences bacterial growth in middle ear effusions.

Materials: Fifty-four samples were obtained from OME patients 3-10 years of age who underwent ventilation tube insertion and were divided into two groups based on the presence of allergy as determined using the multiple allergosorbent test (MAST). Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis bacterial DNA in the middle ear effusions was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. Overall detection rates and those for each species were compared between the two groups.

Results: Of the 54 middle ear effusion samples, 38 (70.4 %) contained bacterial DNA and 14 (36.8 %) of these contained DNA from multiple species. S. pneumoniae was detected in 27 samples (50 %), H. influenzae in 17 samples (31.4 %), and M. catarrhalis in 9 samples (16.6 %). There was no significant difference in the bacterial detection rates between the middle ear effusions of the MAST-positive and MAST-negative groups.

Conclusion: The rate of bacteria detection in middle ear effusions did not differ between allergic and non-allergic children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The rates of the overall detection of bacteria and detection of multiple bacteria in middle ear effusion using polymerase chain reaction in MAST-positive and -negative groups (MAST, multiple allergosorbent test)
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Fig1: The rates of the overall detection of bacteria and detection of multiple bacteria in middle ear effusion using polymerase chain reaction in MAST-positive and -negative groups (MAST, multiple allergosorbent test)

Mentions: Fifty-four ears of 34 children from 3–10 years old were enrolled in this study. Of the 54 ears, 15 were positive as determined by MAST, while the remaining 39 were negative. The mean ages of the children in the MAST-positive and -negative groups were 3.73 ± 2.25 years and 3.23 ± 0.93 years, respectively. The rate of bacteria detection using conventional culture methods was only 9.0 % (5/54) and the species cultured were S. pneumoniae, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, and α-hemolytic Streptococcus. The overall detection rate of bacterial DNA using PCR was 70.4 % (38 of 54 ears) (Table 1). In 14 of 38 ears (36.8 %), two or more bacterial species were detected in the same effusion sample. The overall detection rate of the bacteria did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between the MAST-positive and -negative groups, nor did the detection rates of each bacterial species (Fig. 1). There was no significant difference in the detection rate of multiple bacteria between the two groups (Fig.1).Table 1


Detection of bacteria in middle ear effusions based on the presence of allergy: does allergy augment bacterial infection in the middle ear?

Kim WJ, Kim BG, Chang KH, Oh JH - J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2015)

The rates of the overall detection of bacteria and detection of multiple bacteria in middle ear effusion using polymerase chain reaction in MAST-positive and -negative groups (MAST, multiple allergosorbent test)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696230&req=5

Fig1: The rates of the overall detection of bacteria and detection of multiple bacteria in middle ear effusion using polymerase chain reaction in MAST-positive and -negative groups (MAST, multiple allergosorbent test)
Mentions: Fifty-four ears of 34 children from 3–10 years old were enrolled in this study. Of the 54 ears, 15 were positive as determined by MAST, while the remaining 39 were negative. The mean ages of the children in the MAST-positive and -negative groups were 3.73 ± 2.25 years and 3.23 ± 0.93 years, respectively. The rate of bacteria detection using conventional culture methods was only 9.0 % (5/54) and the species cultured were S. pneumoniae, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, and α-hemolytic Streptococcus. The overall detection rate of bacterial DNA using PCR was 70.4 % (38 of 54 ears) (Table 1). In 14 of 38 ears (36.8 %), two or more bacterial species were detected in the same effusion sample. The overall detection rate of the bacteria did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) between the MAST-positive and -negative groups, nor did the detection rates of each bacterial species (Fig. 1). There was no significant difference in the detection rate of multiple bacteria between the two groups (Fig.1).Table 1

Bottom Line: Overall detection rates and those for each species were compared between the two groups.S. pneumoniae was detected in 27 samples (50 %), H. influenzae in 17 samples (31.4 %), and M. catarrhalis in 9 samples (16.6 %).The rate of bacteria detection in middle ear effusions did not differ between allergic and non-allergic children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. kwjent@catholic.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bacterial infection, Eustachian tube dysfunction, allergies, and immunologic factors are major causes of otitis media with effusion (OME). However, the exact pathogenesis of OME is still unclear. This study evaluated whether allergy influences bacterial growth in middle ear effusions.

Materials: Fifty-four samples were obtained from OME patients 3-10 years of age who underwent ventilation tube insertion and were divided into two groups based on the presence of allergy as determined using the multiple allergosorbent test (MAST). Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis bacterial DNA in the middle ear effusions was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. Overall detection rates and those for each species were compared between the two groups.

Results: Of the 54 middle ear effusion samples, 38 (70.4 %) contained bacterial DNA and 14 (36.8 %) of these contained DNA from multiple species. S. pneumoniae was detected in 27 samples (50 %), H. influenzae in 17 samples (31.4 %), and M. catarrhalis in 9 samples (16.6 %). There was no significant difference in the bacterial detection rates between the middle ear effusions of the MAST-positive and MAST-negative groups.

Conclusion: The rate of bacteria detection in middle ear effusions did not differ between allergic and non-allergic children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus