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Phylogenetic investigation of enteric bovine coronavirus in Ireland reveals partitioning between European and global strains.

Gunn L, Collins PJ, O'Connell MJ, O'Shea H - Ir Vet J (2015)

Bottom Line: The spike gene which encodes a protein involved in viral entry, infectivity and immune response shows the most variability amongst the isolates and was subsequently selected for in depth analysis.Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene revealed that the Irish strains clustered with novel BCoV strains from Europe in a unique clade, possibly indicating lineage partitioning.Direct analysis of alignments identified amino acid changes in the spike protein unique to the Irish clade.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Cork Institute of Technology, Rossa Ave, Bishopstown, Cork Ireland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bovine coronavirus is a primary cause of neonatal calf diarrhea worldwide, and is also associated with acute diarrhea in adult cattle during the winter season. There are no reports on molecular characterization of bovine coronavirus in Ireland, and little data exists apart from serological studies.

Findings: In this study, 11 neonatal (mean age 9 days) calf BCoV strains from the south of Ireland were collected over a one year period and characterized using molecular methods. The spike gene which encodes a protein involved in viral entry, infectivity and immune response shows the most variability amongst the isolates and was subsequently selected for in depth analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene revealed that the Irish strains clustered with novel BCoV strains from Europe in a unique clade, possibly indicating lineage partitioning. Direct analysis of alignments identified amino acid changes in the spike protein unique to the Irish clade.

Conclusion: Thus, monitoring of bovine coronavirus in Ireland is important as the current isolates in circulation in the south of Ireland may be diverging from the available vaccine strain, which may have implications regarding future BCoV vaccine efficacy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maximum likelihood tree based on the complete spike gene (4092 bp), including the S1 and S2 subunits. Irish isolates from this study are indicated by a filled circle (●) in the tree
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Fig3: Maximum likelihood tree based on the complete spike gene (4092 bp), including the S1 and S2 subunits. Irish isolates from this study are indicated by a filled circle (●) in the tree

Mentions: Resulting sequence data was then analysed and edited using Bioedit v7.0.9.0 [14] and online BLAST tool (http://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi), to identify homologous strains. Sequence alignment was carried out using Clustal W in Bioedit [14], and a sequence alignment profile generated (Fig. 1). For analysis of the whole S gene, contigs were assembled using DNAstar program Seqman. The phylogenetic trees for the S gene were constructed using Maximum likelihood (ML) in MEGA5.1 [15] with a GTR model, plus gamma distribution and invariant sites with 1000 bootstrap replicates (Figs. 2 and 3). In ML trees shown, all strains are displayed with accession numbers.Fig. 1


Phylogenetic investigation of enteric bovine coronavirus in Ireland reveals partitioning between European and global strains.

Gunn L, Collins PJ, O'Connell MJ, O'Shea H - Ir Vet J (2015)

Maximum likelihood tree based on the complete spike gene (4092 bp), including the S1 and S2 subunits. Irish isolates from this study are indicated by a filled circle (●) in the tree
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4696222&req=5

Fig3: Maximum likelihood tree based on the complete spike gene (4092 bp), including the S1 and S2 subunits. Irish isolates from this study are indicated by a filled circle (●) in the tree
Mentions: Resulting sequence data was then analysed and edited using Bioedit v7.0.9.0 [14] and online BLAST tool (http://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi), to identify homologous strains. Sequence alignment was carried out using Clustal W in Bioedit [14], and a sequence alignment profile generated (Fig. 1). For analysis of the whole S gene, contigs were assembled using DNAstar program Seqman. The phylogenetic trees for the S gene were constructed using Maximum likelihood (ML) in MEGA5.1 [15] with a GTR model, plus gamma distribution and invariant sites with 1000 bootstrap replicates (Figs. 2 and 3). In ML trees shown, all strains are displayed with accession numbers.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The spike gene which encodes a protein involved in viral entry, infectivity and immune response shows the most variability amongst the isolates and was subsequently selected for in depth analysis.Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene revealed that the Irish strains clustered with novel BCoV strains from Europe in a unique clade, possibly indicating lineage partitioning.Direct analysis of alignments identified amino acid changes in the spike protein unique to the Irish clade.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Cork Institute of Technology, Rossa Ave, Bishopstown, Cork Ireland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bovine coronavirus is a primary cause of neonatal calf diarrhea worldwide, and is also associated with acute diarrhea in adult cattle during the winter season. There are no reports on molecular characterization of bovine coronavirus in Ireland, and little data exists apart from serological studies.

Findings: In this study, 11 neonatal (mean age 9 days) calf BCoV strains from the south of Ireland were collected over a one year period and characterized using molecular methods. The spike gene which encodes a protein involved in viral entry, infectivity and immune response shows the most variability amongst the isolates and was subsequently selected for in depth analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene revealed that the Irish strains clustered with novel BCoV strains from Europe in a unique clade, possibly indicating lineage partitioning. Direct analysis of alignments identified amino acid changes in the spike protein unique to the Irish clade.

Conclusion: Thus, monitoring of bovine coronavirus in Ireland is important as the current isolates in circulation in the south of Ireland may be diverging from the available vaccine strain, which may have implications regarding future BCoV vaccine efficacy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus