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Nature of low-frequency noise in homogeneous semiconductors.

Palenskis V, Maknys K - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon.The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices.It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vilnius University, Faculty of Physics, Saulėtekio al. 9, LT-10222 Vilnius, Lithuania.

ABSTRACT
This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon. We perform detail calculations of resistance fluctuations of the silicon sample due to both a) the charge carrier number changes due to their capture-emission processes, and b) due to screening effect of those negative charged centers, and show that proportionality of noise level to square mobility appears as a presentation parameter, but not due to mobility fluctuations. The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices. It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Modeled low frequency noise spectra with small number of widely distributed relaxation times τri.Function g0(f) = 0.2/f (linear line in logarithmic scale) shows the 1/f noise spectrum when the relaxation times are distributed as , i. e., one-by-one of the relaxation time in every two octaves; g1(τ, f) (line with open dots) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every two octaves; g2(τ, f) (solid line) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every decade.
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f3: Modeled low frequency noise spectra with small number of widely distributed relaxation times τri.Function g0(f) = 0.2/f (linear line in logarithmic scale) shows the 1/f noise spectrum when the relaxation times are distributed as , i. e., one-by-one of the relaxation time in every two octaves; g1(τ, f) (line with open dots) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every two octaves; g2(τ, f) (solid line) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every decade.

Mentions: For simplicity we take that τei = τci, when the Fermi energy coincides with the deep energy level of the defect. The simulated low frequency noise spectra are presented in Fig. 3. Function g0(f) = 0.2/f represents almost ideal 1/f law (uncertainty is less than 5%). It is obtained assuming that relaxation times τri are distributed as , i. e., one-by-one relaxation time in every two octaves (here τl is the longest experimentally noticeable relaxation time in the investigated frequency range). It is needed only M = 15 relaxators providing the required relaxation times in order to generate 1/f noise in frequency range from 1 Hz to 1 MHz with high accuracy. In the case when these relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in every two octave range, the noise spectrum is presented by function g1(τ, f) (Fig. 3, line with open dots). It is seen that curve g1(τ, f) in average coincides with g0(f) = 0.2/f. The curve g1(τ, f) has only small waves or bumps comparing with g0(f). In the case when the relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in every decade range, the noise spectrum is presented by function g2(τ, f), which is lower and has a noticeable components of Lorentzian spectrum.


Nature of low-frequency noise in homogeneous semiconductors.

Palenskis V, Maknys K - Sci Rep (2015)

Modeled low frequency noise spectra with small number of widely distributed relaxation times τri.Function g0(f) = 0.2/f (linear line in logarithmic scale) shows the 1/f noise spectrum when the relaxation times are distributed as , i. e., one-by-one of the relaxation time in every two octaves; g1(τ, f) (line with open dots) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every two octaves; g2(τ, f) (solid line) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every decade.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4682134&req=5

f3: Modeled low frequency noise spectra with small number of widely distributed relaxation times τri.Function g0(f) = 0.2/f (linear line in logarithmic scale) shows the 1/f noise spectrum when the relaxation times are distributed as , i. e., one-by-one of the relaxation time in every two octaves; g1(τ, f) (line with open dots) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every two octaves; g2(τ, f) (solid line) is the noise spectrum when relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in the range of every decade.
Mentions: For simplicity we take that τei = τci, when the Fermi energy coincides with the deep energy level of the defect. The simulated low frequency noise spectra are presented in Fig. 3. Function g0(f) = 0.2/f represents almost ideal 1/f law (uncertainty is less than 5%). It is obtained assuming that relaxation times τri are distributed as , i. e., one-by-one relaxation time in every two octaves (here τl is the longest experimentally noticeable relaxation time in the investigated frequency range). It is needed only M = 15 relaxators providing the required relaxation times in order to generate 1/f noise in frequency range from 1 Hz to 1 MHz with high accuracy. In the case when these relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in every two octave range, the noise spectrum is presented by function g1(τ, f) (Fig. 3, line with open dots). It is seen that curve g1(τ, f) in average coincides with g0(f) = 0.2/f. The curve g1(τ, f) has only small waves or bumps comparing with g0(f). In the case when the relaxation times are arbitrarily distributed one-by-one in every decade range, the noise spectrum is presented by function g2(τ, f), which is lower and has a noticeable components of Lorentzian spectrum.

Bottom Line: This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon.The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices.It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vilnius University, Faculty of Physics, Saulėtekio al. 9, LT-10222 Vilnius, Lithuania.

ABSTRACT
This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon. We perform detail calculations of resistance fluctuations of the silicon sample due to both a) the charge carrier number changes due to their capture-emission processes, and b) due to screening effect of those negative charged centers, and show that proportionality of noise level to square mobility appears as a presentation parameter, but not due to mobility fluctuations. The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices. It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus