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Management of high-energy tibial pilon fractures.

Jacob N, Amin A, Giotakis N, Narayan B, Nayagam S, Trompeter AJ - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2015)

Bottom Line: Tibial pilon fractures result from high-energy trauma unlike usual ankle fractures.Their management provides numerous challenges to the orthopaedic surgeon including obtaining anatomic reduction of articular surface and the management of associated soft tissue injuries.This article aims to review major advances and principles that guide our practice today.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London, SW17 0QT, UK. nebujacob@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Tibial pilon fractures result from high-energy trauma unlike usual ankle fractures. Their management provides numerous challenges to the orthopaedic surgeon including obtaining anatomic reduction of articular surface and the management of associated soft tissue injuries. This article aims to review major advances and principles that guide our practice today. We also discuss a treatment algorithm based on a staged approach to the fracture: initial spanning external fixation followed by definitive fixation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

AO classification of distal tibial fractures (Müller AO Classification of Fractures-Long Bones, Copyright by AO Foundation, Switzerland)
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Fig1: AO classification of distal tibial fractures (Müller AO Classification of Fractures-Long Bones, Copyright by AO Foundation, Switzerland)

Mentions: The AO/OTA group use an alphanumeric system to describe all fractures. The first number represents the bone: in this case, tibia is ‘4’; the second represents the segment of bone which in this case is ‘3’ for distal. Following this, ‘A’ represents extra-articular fractures within 5 cm of the ankle joint and ‘B’ represents partial articular injuries, both not included in this review. Group ‘C’ denotes complete articular injury where there is no direct continuity between the diaphysis and the articular segment. This group accounts for the majority of high-energy pilon fractures. The final numbers in this classification represent the subgroups of each type and refer to the degree of comminution of the articular component and the metaphysis (Fig. 1).Fig. 3


Management of high-energy tibial pilon fractures.

Jacob N, Amin A, Giotakis N, Narayan B, Nayagam S, Trompeter AJ - Strategies Trauma Limb Reconstr (2015)

AO classification of distal tibial fractures (Müller AO Classification of Fractures-Long Bones, Copyright by AO Foundation, Switzerland)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4666229&req=5

Fig1: AO classification of distal tibial fractures (Müller AO Classification of Fractures-Long Bones, Copyright by AO Foundation, Switzerland)
Mentions: The AO/OTA group use an alphanumeric system to describe all fractures. The first number represents the bone: in this case, tibia is ‘4’; the second represents the segment of bone which in this case is ‘3’ for distal. Following this, ‘A’ represents extra-articular fractures within 5 cm of the ankle joint and ‘B’ represents partial articular injuries, both not included in this review. Group ‘C’ denotes complete articular injury where there is no direct continuity between the diaphysis and the articular segment. This group accounts for the majority of high-energy pilon fractures. The final numbers in this classification represent the subgroups of each type and refer to the degree of comminution of the articular component and the metaphysis (Fig. 1).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Tibial pilon fractures result from high-energy trauma unlike usual ankle fractures.Their management provides numerous challenges to the orthopaedic surgeon including obtaining anatomic reduction of articular surface and the management of associated soft tissue injuries.This article aims to review major advances and principles that guide our practice today.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London, SW17 0QT, UK. nebujacob@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Tibial pilon fractures result from high-energy trauma unlike usual ankle fractures. Their management provides numerous challenges to the orthopaedic surgeon including obtaining anatomic reduction of articular surface and the management of associated soft tissue injuries. This article aims to review major advances and principles that guide our practice today. We also discuss a treatment algorithm based on a staged approach to the fracture: initial spanning external fixation followed by definitive fixation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus