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Emotion dysregulation, self-image and eating disorder symptoms in University Women.

Monell E, Högdahl L, Mantilla EF, Birgegård A - J Eat Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: There were distinct indirect effects through self-image on the relationship between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms, but not vice versa.These indirect effects were evident in relation to cognitive ED symptoms and both OBE and SBE, but not in relation to excessive exercise.Self-image as an intervening mechanism between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms is relevant for models of the development, maintenance and treatment of ED, as well as treatment focus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Norra Stationsgatan 69 7th floor, 113 64 Stockholm, Sweden ; Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: We studied associations between emotion dysregulation, self-image and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in university women, and contrasted two indirect effect models to examine possible intervening mechanisms to produce ED symptoms.

Methods: 252 female Swedish university students completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) self-image measure, and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Correlations between scales were followed by five simple mediation analysis pairs with two possible pathways using five ED symptom variables as outcome. The models posited either self-image or emotion dysregulation as mediator or independent variable, respectively. ED symptoms were EDE-Q Global score, objective binge eating episodes (OBE), subjective binge eating episodes (SBE), and two variants of EDE-Q excessive exercise.

Results: Emotion dysregulation and self-image were strongly correlated, and both correlated moderately with EDE-Q Global score. There were distinct indirect effects through self-image on the relationship between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms, but not vice versa. These indirect effects were evident in relation to cognitive ED symptoms and both OBE and SBE, but not in relation to excessive exercise.

Conclusions: Results suggest that even if closely related, emotion dysregulation and self-image both contribute unique knowledge in relation to ED symptoms. Self-image as an intervening mechanism between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms is relevant for models of the development, maintenance and treatment of ED, as well as treatment focus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Unstandardized and standardized coefficients mediation model 2; DERS Total score as independent (X), SASB Affiliation score as mediator (M), and EDE-Q Objective Binge eating Episodes as dependent (Y). N = 248. SE = Standard Error. 95 % CI = 95 % Confidence Interval
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Fig2: Unstandardized and standardized coefficients mediation model 2; DERS Total score as independent (X), SASB Affiliation score as mediator (M), and EDE-Q Objective Binge eating Episodes as dependent (Y). N = 248. SE = Standard Error. 95 % CI = 95 % Confidence Interval

Mentions: Results for the indirect effect (mediation) models are reported in unstandardized metric. The first pathway (where emotion dysregulation as X indirectly influenced the five different ED-variables as Y through its effect on self-image as M) had bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals for the indirect effect entirely above zero for three models (Table 2). Those models were the ones with outcome 1) EDE-Q Global score, 2) OBE, and 3) SBE. Coefficients are presented in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, where all unstandardized coefficients are expressed in the metric of the dependent variable, except for path a, which is expressed in the metric of the mediator. Standardized coefficients computed by regression analysis are presented in parentheses alongside their unstandardized counterparts in the figures.Table 2


Emotion dysregulation, self-image and eating disorder symptoms in University Women.

Monell E, Högdahl L, Mantilla EF, Birgegård A - J Eat Disord (2015)

Unstandardized and standardized coefficients mediation model 2; DERS Total score as independent (X), SASB Affiliation score as mediator (M), and EDE-Q Objective Binge eating Episodes as dependent (Y). N = 248. SE = Standard Error. 95 % CI = 95 % Confidence Interval
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4666164&req=5

Fig2: Unstandardized and standardized coefficients mediation model 2; DERS Total score as independent (X), SASB Affiliation score as mediator (M), and EDE-Q Objective Binge eating Episodes as dependent (Y). N = 248. SE = Standard Error. 95 % CI = 95 % Confidence Interval
Mentions: Results for the indirect effect (mediation) models are reported in unstandardized metric. The first pathway (where emotion dysregulation as X indirectly influenced the five different ED-variables as Y through its effect on self-image as M) had bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals for the indirect effect entirely above zero for three models (Table 2). Those models were the ones with outcome 1) EDE-Q Global score, 2) OBE, and 3) SBE. Coefficients are presented in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, where all unstandardized coefficients are expressed in the metric of the dependent variable, except for path a, which is expressed in the metric of the mediator. Standardized coefficients computed by regression analysis are presented in parentheses alongside their unstandardized counterparts in the figures.Table 2

Bottom Line: There were distinct indirect effects through self-image on the relationship between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms, but not vice versa.These indirect effects were evident in relation to cognitive ED symptoms and both OBE and SBE, but not in relation to excessive exercise.Self-image as an intervening mechanism between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms is relevant for models of the development, maintenance and treatment of ED, as well as treatment focus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Norra Stationsgatan 69 7th floor, 113 64 Stockholm, Sweden ; Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: We studied associations between emotion dysregulation, self-image and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in university women, and contrasted two indirect effect models to examine possible intervening mechanisms to produce ED symptoms.

Methods: 252 female Swedish university students completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) self-image measure, and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Correlations between scales were followed by five simple mediation analysis pairs with two possible pathways using five ED symptom variables as outcome. The models posited either self-image or emotion dysregulation as mediator or independent variable, respectively. ED symptoms were EDE-Q Global score, objective binge eating episodes (OBE), subjective binge eating episodes (SBE), and two variants of EDE-Q excessive exercise.

Results: Emotion dysregulation and self-image were strongly correlated, and both correlated moderately with EDE-Q Global score. There were distinct indirect effects through self-image on the relationship between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms, but not vice versa. These indirect effects were evident in relation to cognitive ED symptoms and both OBE and SBE, but not in relation to excessive exercise.

Conclusions: Results suggest that even if closely related, emotion dysregulation and self-image both contribute unique knowledge in relation to ED symptoms. Self-image as an intervening mechanism between emotion dysregulation and ED symptoms is relevant for models of the development, maintenance and treatment of ED, as well as treatment focus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus