Limits...
Perceptions of pre-clerkship medical students and academic advisors about sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance: a cross-sectional perspective from Saudi Arabia.

AlFakhri L, Sarraj J, Kherallah S, Kuhail K, Obeidat A, Abu-Zaid A - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: There were several statistically significant differences of means of students' perceptions according to gender, academic year and cGPA.Our results showed that students had correct conceptions about the negative impact of sleep deprivation on academic performance and mood.Also, our results highlighted the need for curricular/extracurricular education and counseling about healthy sleep patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, 11533, P.O. Box 50927, Saudi Arabia. lalfakhri@alfaisal.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The medical student population is believed to be at an increased risk for sleep deprivation. Little is known about students' perceptions towards sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance. The aim of study is to explore the perceptions of medical students and their academic advisors about sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance.

Methods: The study took place at Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. An online, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-rating survey was administered to first-, third-year students and their academic advisors. Two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the mean 5-point Likert scale responses between students according to gender, academic year and cumulative grade point average (cGPA).

Results: A total of 259 students and 21 academic advisors participated in the survey (response rates: 70.6 and 84%, respectively). The vast majority of students agreed that sleep deprivation negatively affects academic performance (78.8%) and mood (78.4%). Around 62.2 and 73.7% of students agreed that the demanding medical curriculum and stress of final exams lead to sleep deprivation, respectively. While 36.7% of students voiced the need for incorporation of curricular separate courses about healthy sleep patterns into medical curriculum, a much greater proportion of students (45.9%) expressed interest in extracurricular activities about healthy sleep patterns. Interestingly, only 13.5% of students affirmed that they were counselled about sleep patterns and academic performance by their academic advisors. There were several statistically significant differences of means of students' perceptions according to gender, academic year and cGPA. Despite almost all academic advisors (95.5%) asserted the importance of sleep patterns to academic performance, none (0%) inquired about sleep patterns when counselling students. Nineteen academic advisors (90.5%) recommended incorporation of sleep patterns related learning into medical curricula; among those, only 1 (n = 1/19; 5.3%) recommended learning as a separate course whereas the majority (n = 18/19; 94.7%) recommended learning in forms of extracurricular activities and integration into relevant ongoing courses.

Conclusions: Our results showed that students had correct conceptions about the negative impact of sleep deprivation on academic performance and mood. Also, our results highlighted the need for curricular/extracurricular education and counseling about healthy sleep patterns.

Show MeSH
Academic advisors survey
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4666159&req=5

Fig2: Academic advisors survey

Mentions: Two surveys were distributed. The first survey (Fig. 1) was distributed to students, and it was constructed partially based on a literature review (that is, published fact) and partially based on newly introduced survey questions that deemed important by the authors. The second survey was distributed to academic advisors (Fig. 2), and it was constructed fully based on newly introduced survey questions that deemed important by the authors. Afterwards, the students survey was peer-reviewed by two external in-house faculty members to verify its proper structure and content. Then it was pre-tested on a set of students (n = 20) to examine its validity and ensure proper interpretation of survey questions. Results of the pre-tested questions looked satisfactory and valid. Also, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient test was used to measure the extent of internal consistency among the tested items. The overall Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.71 indicating acceptable internal reliability of the students survey data.Fig. 1


Perceptions of pre-clerkship medical students and academic advisors about sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance: a cross-sectional perspective from Saudi Arabia.

AlFakhri L, Sarraj J, Kherallah S, Kuhail K, Obeidat A, Abu-Zaid A - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Academic advisors survey
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4666159&req=5

Fig2: Academic advisors survey
Mentions: Two surveys were distributed. The first survey (Fig. 1) was distributed to students, and it was constructed partially based on a literature review (that is, published fact) and partially based on newly introduced survey questions that deemed important by the authors. The second survey was distributed to academic advisors (Fig. 2), and it was constructed fully based on newly introduced survey questions that deemed important by the authors. Afterwards, the students survey was peer-reviewed by two external in-house faculty members to verify its proper structure and content. Then it was pre-tested on a set of students (n = 20) to examine its validity and ensure proper interpretation of survey questions. Results of the pre-tested questions looked satisfactory and valid. Also, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient test was used to measure the extent of internal consistency among the tested items. The overall Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.71 indicating acceptable internal reliability of the students survey data.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: There were several statistically significant differences of means of students' perceptions according to gender, academic year and cGPA.Our results showed that students had correct conceptions about the negative impact of sleep deprivation on academic performance and mood.Also, our results highlighted the need for curricular/extracurricular education and counseling about healthy sleep patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, 11533, P.O. Box 50927, Saudi Arabia. lalfakhri@alfaisal.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The medical student population is believed to be at an increased risk for sleep deprivation. Little is known about students' perceptions towards sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance. The aim of study is to explore the perceptions of medical students and their academic advisors about sleep deprivation and its relationship to academic performance.

Methods: The study took place at Alfaisal University, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. An online, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-rating survey was administered to first-, third-year students and their academic advisors. Two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the mean 5-point Likert scale responses between students according to gender, academic year and cumulative grade point average (cGPA).

Results: A total of 259 students and 21 academic advisors participated in the survey (response rates: 70.6 and 84%, respectively). The vast majority of students agreed that sleep deprivation negatively affects academic performance (78.8%) and mood (78.4%). Around 62.2 and 73.7% of students agreed that the demanding medical curriculum and stress of final exams lead to sleep deprivation, respectively. While 36.7% of students voiced the need for incorporation of curricular separate courses about healthy sleep patterns into medical curriculum, a much greater proportion of students (45.9%) expressed interest in extracurricular activities about healthy sleep patterns. Interestingly, only 13.5% of students affirmed that they were counselled about sleep patterns and academic performance by their academic advisors. There were several statistically significant differences of means of students' perceptions according to gender, academic year and cGPA. Despite almost all academic advisors (95.5%) asserted the importance of sleep patterns to academic performance, none (0%) inquired about sleep patterns when counselling students. Nineteen academic advisors (90.5%) recommended incorporation of sleep patterns related learning into medical curricula; among those, only 1 (n = 1/19; 5.3%) recommended learning as a separate course whereas the majority (n = 18/19; 94.7%) recommended learning in forms of extracurricular activities and integration into relevant ongoing courses.

Conclusions: Our results showed that students had correct conceptions about the negative impact of sleep deprivation on academic performance and mood. Also, our results highlighted the need for curricular/extracurricular education and counseling about healthy sleep patterns.

Show MeSH