Limits...
Curious Oviposition Behavior in Phyllium westwoodii (Phasmatodea: Phylliidae): Preliminary Observations.

Arai M, Yago M - J. Insect Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: We report that in a leaf insect, Phyllium westwoodii Wood-Mason (Phasmatodea: Phylliidae), two differing apertures can be used for oviposition, the color of eggs being affected by which aperture is used.Eggs which are forcibly propelled from the internal space within the valvulae of the abdomen are brown, whereas white eggs emerge slowly from the opening between the eighth sternite and the valvulae, and are deposited close to the ventral surface of the female.This unusual oviposition system does not appear to have been previously reported in phasmatids or in other insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shirayuri Gakuen Junior High School, 2-4-1 Kudanshita, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0073, Japan.

Show MeSH
The female P. westwoodii used in this study.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664942&req=5

iev111-F1: The female P. westwoodii used in this study.

Mentions: Recently, while rearing Phyllium westwoodii Wood-Mason (Phasmatodea: Phylliidae) (Fig. 1), a mid-sized leaf insect widely distributed in Southeast Asia (Hennemann et al. 2009), we noticed that the aperture used for oviposition, the distance that the eggs were propelled and the color of the eggs appeared to differ between fertilized and unfertilized eggs. As far as we are aware, this situation has not been reported previously in phasmatids or in other insects. In this article, further details of this interesting phenomenon are described.Fig. 1.


Curious Oviposition Behavior in Phyllium westwoodii (Phasmatodea: Phylliidae): Preliminary Observations.

Arai M, Yago M - J. Insect Sci. (2015)

The female P. westwoodii used in this study.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664942&req=5

iev111-F1: The female P. westwoodii used in this study.
Mentions: Recently, while rearing Phyllium westwoodii Wood-Mason (Phasmatodea: Phylliidae) (Fig. 1), a mid-sized leaf insect widely distributed in Southeast Asia (Hennemann et al. 2009), we noticed that the aperture used for oviposition, the distance that the eggs were propelled and the color of the eggs appeared to differ between fertilized and unfertilized eggs. As far as we are aware, this situation has not been reported previously in phasmatids or in other insects. In this article, further details of this interesting phenomenon are described.Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: We report that in a leaf insect, Phyllium westwoodii Wood-Mason (Phasmatodea: Phylliidae), two differing apertures can be used for oviposition, the color of eggs being affected by which aperture is used.Eggs which are forcibly propelled from the internal space within the valvulae of the abdomen are brown, whereas white eggs emerge slowly from the opening between the eighth sternite and the valvulae, and are deposited close to the ventral surface of the female.This unusual oviposition system does not appear to have been previously reported in phasmatids or in other insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shirayuri Gakuen Junior High School, 2-4-1 Kudanshita, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0073, Japan.

Show MeSH