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Multilayered Graphene Nano-Film for Controlled Protein Delivery by Desired Electro-Stimuli.

Choi M, Kim KG, Heo J, Jeong H, Kim SY, Hong J - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest.We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO.This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering &Materials Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has highlighted the potential use of "smart" films, such as graphene sheets, that would allow for the controlled release of a variety of therapeutic drugs. Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest. We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO. We successfully showed that these multilayer films are capable of blocking the initial burst release of OVA, and they can be triggered to precisely control the release upon the application of electrochemical potential. This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Schematic illustration of the electrochemical setup for applying electrical stimuli. (B) Chronoamperometric response of the (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film. A constant potential of 0.4 V is applied for 30 seconds. (C) (Red) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time when no electrical potential is applied. (Black) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time upon the application of 0.4 V. (D) Potential-dependent release of protein from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film.
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f3: (A) Schematic illustration of the electrochemical setup for applying electrical stimuli. (B) Chronoamperometric response of the (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film. A constant potential of 0.4 V is applied for 30 seconds. (C) (Red) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time when no electrical potential is applied. (Black) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time upon the application of 0.4 V. (D) Potential-dependent release of protein from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film.

Mentions: Once it was established that our nanofilms could be built with a moderate control of film thickness (i.e. the amount of OVA), their protein release characteristics were examined after submerging them in phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) solution under physiological conditions (5% CO2, 37 °C). A schematic diagram of the three-electrode setup used for applying the electrical potential onto our nanofilms is shown in Fig. 3A. A constant potential ranging from 0.2–0.7 V was applied repeatedly at an interval of 30 minutes. Figure 3B shows a chronoamperogram (current vs. time) when a constant potential of 0.4 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied onto the (PAE/rGO/GO/OVA/GO/rGO)40 film; an initial spike and then rapid decrease of current over time was observed, which is typical of a conductive thin film under the application of a constant potential. Based on the measured open circuit potential of about 0.1 V, the positive values of current (defined by the potentiostat/galvanostat used) indicate that hydrated anions and water move into the film to achieve surface charge neutrality when the positive potential of 0.4 V is applied.


Multilayered Graphene Nano-Film for Controlled Protein Delivery by Desired Electro-Stimuli.

Choi M, Kim KG, Heo J, Jeong H, Kim SY, Hong J - Sci Rep (2015)

(A) Schematic illustration of the electrochemical setup for applying electrical stimuli. (B) Chronoamperometric response of the (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film. A constant potential of 0.4 V is applied for 30 seconds. (C) (Red) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time when no electrical potential is applied. (Black) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time upon the application of 0.4 V. (D) Potential-dependent release of protein from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f3: (A) Schematic illustration of the electrochemical setup for applying electrical stimuli. (B) Chronoamperometric response of the (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film. A constant potential of 0.4 V is applied for 30 seconds. (C) (Red) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time when no electrical potential is applied. (Black) Amount of protein released from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 as a function of time upon the application of 0.4 V. (D) Potential-dependent release of protein from (PAE/rGO−/GO+/OVA/GO+/rGO−)40 film.
Mentions: Once it was established that our nanofilms could be built with a moderate control of film thickness (i.e. the amount of OVA), their protein release characteristics were examined after submerging them in phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) solution under physiological conditions (5% CO2, 37 °C). A schematic diagram of the three-electrode setup used for applying the electrical potential onto our nanofilms is shown in Fig. 3A. A constant potential ranging from 0.2–0.7 V was applied repeatedly at an interval of 30 minutes. Figure 3B shows a chronoamperogram (current vs. time) when a constant potential of 0.4 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied onto the (PAE/rGO/GO/OVA/GO/rGO)40 film; an initial spike and then rapid decrease of current over time was observed, which is typical of a conductive thin film under the application of a constant potential. Based on the measured open circuit potential of about 0.1 V, the positive values of current (defined by the potentiostat/galvanostat used) indicate that hydrated anions and water move into the film to achieve surface charge neutrality when the positive potential of 0.4 V is applied.

Bottom Line: Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest.We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO.This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering &Materials Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has highlighted the potential use of "smart" films, such as graphene sheets, that would allow for the controlled release of a variety of therapeutic drugs. Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest. We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO. We successfully showed that these multilayer films are capable of blocking the initial burst release of OVA, and they can be triggered to precisely control the release upon the application of electrochemical potential. This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus