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Multilayered Graphene Nano-Film for Controlled Protein Delivery by Desired Electro-Stimuli.

Choi M, Kim KG, Heo J, Jeong H, Kim SY, Hong J - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest.We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO.This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering &Materials Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has highlighted the potential use of "smart" films, such as graphene sheets, that would allow for the controlled release of a variety of therapeutic drugs. Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest. We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO. We successfully showed that these multilayer films are capable of blocking the initial burst release of OVA, and they can be triggered to precisely control the release upon the application of electrochemical potential. This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic illustration of the manner by which protein is released from a multilayer film after electrical stimuli (The figure was drawn by M.C.).
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f1: Schematic illustration of the manner by which protein is released from a multilayer film after electrical stimuli (The figure was drawn by M.C.).

Mentions: In the present study, we demonstrate an active, on-demand model vaccine antigen delivery system based on LbL nanofilms with multilayers of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and GO, and enabled by electrical stimulation (Fig. 1). The rGO layers are included in the film for increased conduction upon the application of electrical stimulation, because although GO can serve as a barrier layer for sustained protein release, its low conductivity is not suitable for the facile transfer of electrons in electrical stimulation. Therefore, we incorporated rGO, whose conductivity is typically a few orders of magnitude higher than GO33. We used ovalbumin(OVA), a 45 kDa globular protein used as a model vaccine antigen34353637. Our LbL film was demonstrated to be capable of both sustained and real-time control of therapeutic molecule release. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating on-demand protein release from LbL films using electrical stimulation and rGO/GO composites.


Multilayered Graphene Nano-Film for Controlled Protein Delivery by Desired Electro-Stimuli.

Choi M, Kim KG, Heo J, Jeong H, Kim SY, Hong J - Sci Rep (2015)

Schematic illustration of the manner by which protein is released from a multilayer film after electrical stimuli (The figure was drawn by M.C.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664934&req=5

f1: Schematic illustration of the manner by which protein is released from a multilayer film after electrical stimuli (The figure was drawn by M.C.).
Mentions: In the present study, we demonstrate an active, on-demand model vaccine antigen delivery system based on LbL nanofilms with multilayers of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and GO, and enabled by electrical stimulation (Fig. 1). The rGO layers are included in the film for increased conduction upon the application of electrical stimulation, because although GO can serve as a barrier layer for sustained protein release, its low conductivity is not suitable for the facile transfer of electrons in electrical stimulation. Therefore, we incorporated rGO, whose conductivity is typically a few orders of magnitude higher than GO33. We used ovalbumin(OVA), a 45 kDa globular protein used as a model vaccine antigen34353637. Our LbL film was demonstrated to be capable of both sustained and real-time control of therapeutic molecule release. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating on-demand protein release from LbL films using electrical stimulation and rGO/GO composites.

Bottom Line: Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest.We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO.This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering &Materials Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has highlighted the potential use of "smart" films, such as graphene sheets, that would allow for the controlled release of a variety of therapeutic drugs. Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest. We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO. We successfully showed that these multilayer films are capable of blocking the initial burst release of OVA, and they can be triggered to precisely control the release upon the application of electrochemical potential. This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus