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True and Perceived Synchrony are Preferentially Associated With Particular Sensory Pairings.

Noel JP, Wallace MT, Orchard-Mills E, Alais D, Van der Burg E - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We demonstrate that TBWs correlate within individuals and across multisensory pairings, but PSSs do not.Further, we reveal that while the audiotactile and audiovisual pairings show tightly related TBWs, they also exhibit a differential relationship with respect to true and perceived multisensory synchrony.Thus, audiotactile and audiovisual temporal processing share mechanistic features yet are respectively functionally linked to objective and subjective synchrony.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Graduate Program, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37240, USA.

ABSTRACT
Perception and behavior are fundamentally shaped by the integration of different sensory modalities into unique multisensory representations, a process governed by spatio-temporal correspondence. Prior work has characterized temporal perception using the point in time at which subjects are most likely to judge multisensory stimuli to be simultaneous (PSS) and the temporal binding window (TBW) over which participants are likely to do so. Here we examine the relationship between the PSS and the TBW within and between individuals, and within and between three sensory combinations: audiovisual, audiotactile and visuotactile. We demonstrate that TBWs correlate within individuals and across multisensory pairings, but PSSs do not. Further, we reveal that while the audiotactile and audiovisual pairings show tightly related TBWs, they also exhibit a differential relationship with respect to true and perceived multisensory synchrony. Thus, audiotactile and audiovisual temporal processing share mechanistic features yet are respectively functionally linked to objective and subjective synchrony.

No MeSH data available.


Relationship between TBW widths for different modality pairings and distance from true and perceived simultaneity.Distance between the peak of simultaneity reports for individual participants and true synchrony (SOA = 0) is significantly correlated for the audio-tactile pair (A), but not the audio-visual (B) or visuo-tactile (C) pairs. Conversely, the distance between an individual’s PSS and mean perceived synchrony are correlated for the audio-visual (E) but not the audio-tactile (D) or visuo-tactile (F) pairs.
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f3: Relationship between TBW widths for different modality pairings and distance from true and perceived simultaneity.Distance between the peak of simultaneity reports for individual participants and true synchrony (SOA = 0) is significantly correlated for the audio-tactile pair (A), but not the audio-visual (B) or visuo-tactile (C) pairs. Conversely, the distance between an individual’s PSS and mean perceived synchrony are correlated for the audio-visual (E) but not the audio-tactile (D) or visuo-tactile (F) pairs.

Mentions: To test the relationship between the size of the TBW and objective synchrony, we simply correlated the TBW with the absolute distance of the distribution’s peak from zero. To test the relation between TBW width and subjective synchrony, we calculated the distance between each participant’s PSS and the group’s mean PSS and correlated this with TBW size. As depicted in Fig. 3 (upper row), the size of the AT TBW was positively correlated with objective simultaneity (SOA = 0), (R2 = 0.60, p < 0.001). Thus, as the delta relative to true simultaneity increased, the width of the TBW increased. In contrast, no relationship was found between the distance from objective synchrony and TBW for the AV (R2 = 0.0 9, p = 0.22) or VT (R2 = 0.02, p = 0.54) pairs. On the other hand, when plotted in terms of distance to subjective synchrony, TBW increased significantly for the AV pair (R2 = 0.30, p < 0.05, Fig. 3, lower row) but no correlation was found for the AT (R2 = 0.10, p = 0.18) or VT (R2 = 0.04, p = 0.42) pairs.


True and Perceived Synchrony are Preferentially Associated With Particular Sensory Pairings.

Noel JP, Wallace MT, Orchard-Mills E, Alais D, Van der Burg E - Sci Rep (2015)

Relationship between TBW widths for different modality pairings and distance from true and perceived simultaneity.Distance between the peak of simultaneity reports for individual participants and true synchrony (SOA = 0) is significantly correlated for the audio-tactile pair (A), but not the audio-visual (B) or visuo-tactile (C) pairs. Conversely, the distance between an individual’s PSS and mean perceived synchrony are correlated for the audio-visual (E) but not the audio-tactile (D) or visuo-tactile (F) pairs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664927&req=5

f3: Relationship between TBW widths for different modality pairings and distance from true and perceived simultaneity.Distance between the peak of simultaneity reports for individual participants and true synchrony (SOA = 0) is significantly correlated for the audio-tactile pair (A), but not the audio-visual (B) or visuo-tactile (C) pairs. Conversely, the distance between an individual’s PSS and mean perceived synchrony are correlated for the audio-visual (E) but not the audio-tactile (D) or visuo-tactile (F) pairs.
Mentions: To test the relationship between the size of the TBW and objective synchrony, we simply correlated the TBW with the absolute distance of the distribution’s peak from zero. To test the relation between TBW width and subjective synchrony, we calculated the distance between each participant’s PSS and the group’s mean PSS and correlated this with TBW size. As depicted in Fig. 3 (upper row), the size of the AT TBW was positively correlated with objective simultaneity (SOA = 0), (R2 = 0.60, p < 0.001). Thus, as the delta relative to true simultaneity increased, the width of the TBW increased. In contrast, no relationship was found between the distance from objective synchrony and TBW for the AV (R2 = 0.0 9, p = 0.22) or VT (R2 = 0.02, p = 0.54) pairs. On the other hand, when plotted in terms of distance to subjective synchrony, TBW increased significantly for the AV pair (R2 = 0.30, p < 0.05, Fig. 3, lower row) but no correlation was found for the AT (R2 = 0.10, p = 0.18) or VT (R2 = 0.04, p = 0.42) pairs.

Bottom Line: We demonstrate that TBWs correlate within individuals and across multisensory pairings, but PSSs do not.Further, we reveal that while the audiotactile and audiovisual pairings show tightly related TBWs, they also exhibit a differential relationship with respect to true and perceived multisensory synchrony.Thus, audiotactile and audiovisual temporal processing share mechanistic features yet are respectively functionally linked to objective and subjective synchrony.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Graduate Program, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37240, USA.

ABSTRACT
Perception and behavior are fundamentally shaped by the integration of different sensory modalities into unique multisensory representations, a process governed by spatio-temporal correspondence. Prior work has characterized temporal perception using the point in time at which subjects are most likely to judge multisensory stimuli to be simultaneous (PSS) and the temporal binding window (TBW) over which participants are likely to do so. Here we examine the relationship between the PSS and the TBW within and between individuals, and within and between three sensory combinations: audiovisual, audiotactile and visuotactile. We demonstrate that TBWs correlate within individuals and across multisensory pairings, but PSSs do not. Further, we reveal that while the audiotactile and audiovisual pairings show tightly related TBWs, they also exhibit a differential relationship with respect to true and perceived multisensory synchrony. Thus, audiotactile and audiovisual temporal processing share mechanistic features yet are respectively functionally linked to objective and subjective synchrony.

No MeSH data available.