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Improved In vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice using X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography.

Yaroshenko A, Hellbach K, Yildirim AÖ, Conlon TM, Fernandez IE, Bech M, Velroyen A, Meinel FG, Auweter S, Reiser M, Eickelberg O, Pfeiffer F - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This imaging method is based on the detection of small-angle x-ray scattering that occurs at the air-tissue interfaces in the lung.The presented radiography method is significantly more sensitive in detecting morphological changes compared with conventional x-ray imaging, and exhibits a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional x-ray CT.As a result of the improved imaging sensitivity, this new imaging modality could be used in future to reduce the number of animals required for pulmonary research studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department &Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and progressive lung disease with a median life expectancy of 4-5 years after initial diagnosis. Early diagnosis and accurate monitoring of IPF are limited by a lack of sensitive imaging techniques that are able to visualize early fibrotic changes at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface. Here, we report a new x-ray imaging approach that directly visualizes the air-tissue interfaces in mice in vivo. This imaging method is based on the detection of small-angle x-ray scattering that occurs at the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Small-angle scattering is detected with a Talbot-Lau interferometer, which provides the so-called x-ray dark-field signal. Using this imaging modality, we demonstrate-for the first time-the quantification of early pathogenic changes and their correlation with histological changes, as assessed by stereological morphometry. The presented radiography method is significantly more sensitive in detecting morphological changes compared with conventional x-ray imaging, and exhibits a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional x-ray CT. As a result of the improved imaging sensitivity, this new imaging modality could be used in future to reduce the number of animals required for pulmonary research studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between the quantified tissue percentage and the mean logarithmic x-ray transmission (A) and the dark-field signal (B).The black line is a linear fit to the data.
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f5: Correlation between the quantified tissue percentage and the mean logarithmic x-ray transmission (A) and the dark-field signal (B).The black line is a linear fit to the data.

Mentions: In order to evaluate how both transmission and dark-field signals scale with the progression of fibrosis, a scatterplot was created correlating both imaging signals with the tissue percentage, obtained by terms of histological analysis. Similarly to x-ray transmission, the dark-field signal scales with a negative exponential with the sample thickness2122. Hence, the logarithm of both signals was considered for the analysis. The resulting scatterplots are shown in Fig. 5. Control and fibrotic animals are marked with blue and magenta color, respectively. A linear fit was added to the plots for a better visualization of the linear correlation, predicted by simulations33.


Improved In vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice using X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography.

Yaroshenko A, Hellbach K, Yildirim AÖ, Conlon TM, Fernandez IE, Bech M, Velroyen A, Meinel FG, Auweter S, Reiser M, Eickelberg O, Pfeiffer F - Sci Rep (2015)

Correlation between the quantified tissue percentage and the mean logarithmic x-ray transmission (A) and the dark-field signal (B).The black line is a linear fit to the data.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664921&req=5

f5: Correlation between the quantified tissue percentage and the mean logarithmic x-ray transmission (A) and the dark-field signal (B).The black line is a linear fit to the data.
Mentions: In order to evaluate how both transmission and dark-field signals scale with the progression of fibrosis, a scatterplot was created correlating both imaging signals with the tissue percentage, obtained by terms of histological analysis. Similarly to x-ray transmission, the dark-field signal scales with a negative exponential with the sample thickness2122. Hence, the logarithm of both signals was considered for the analysis. The resulting scatterplots are shown in Fig. 5. Control and fibrotic animals are marked with blue and magenta color, respectively. A linear fit was added to the plots for a better visualization of the linear correlation, predicted by simulations33.

Bottom Line: This imaging method is based on the detection of small-angle x-ray scattering that occurs at the air-tissue interfaces in the lung.The presented radiography method is significantly more sensitive in detecting morphological changes compared with conventional x-ray imaging, and exhibits a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional x-ray CT.As a result of the improved imaging sensitivity, this new imaging modality could be used in future to reduce the number of animals required for pulmonary research studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department &Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and progressive lung disease with a median life expectancy of 4-5 years after initial diagnosis. Early diagnosis and accurate monitoring of IPF are limited by a lack of sensitive imaging techniques that are able to visualize early fibrotic changes at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface. Here, we report a new x-ray imaging approach that directly visualizes the air-tissue interfaces in mice in vivo. This imaging method is based on the detection of small-angle x-ray scattering that occurs at the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Small-angle scattering is detected with a Talbot-Lau interferometer, which provides the so-called x-ray dark-field signal. Using this imaging modality, we demonstrate-for the first time-the quantification of early pathogenic changes and their correlation with histological changes, as assessed by stereological morphometry. The presented radiography method is significantly more sensitive in detecting morphological changes compared with conventional x-ray imaging, and exhibits a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional x-ray CT. As a result of the improved imaging sensitivity, this new imaging modality could be used in future to reduce the number of animals required for pulmonary research studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus