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A global map of hemispheric influenza vaccine recommendations based on local patterns of viral circulation.

Alonso WJ, Yu C, Viboud C, Richard SA, Schuck-Paim C, Simonsen L, Mello WA, Miller MA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Both the Northern and the Southern Hemisphere annual WHO influenza vaccine recommendations are designed to ensure vaccine delivery before the winter-time peak of viral circulation in each hemisphere.Influenza vaccine recommendations for respectively 25% and 39% of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere countries were out of phase with peak influenza circulation in their corresponding hemisphere (62% and 53%, respectively, when the analysis was limited to the 52 countries in the tropical belt).These results indicate that routine influenza immunization efforts should be closely tailored to local patterns of viral circulation, rather than a country's hemispheric position.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

ABSTRACT
Both the Northern and the Southern Hemisphere annual WHO influenza vaccine recommendations are designed to ensure vaccine delivery before the winter-time peak of viral circulation in each hemisphere. However, influenza seasonal patterns are highly diverse in tropical countries and may be out of phase with the WHO recommendations for their respective hemisphere. We modelled the peak timing of influenza activity for 125 countries using laboratory-based surveillance data from the WHO's FLUNET database and compared it with the influenza hemispheric recommendations in place. Influenza vaccine recommendations for respectively 25% and 39% of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere countries were out of phase with peak influenza circulation in their corresponding hemisphere (62% and 53%, respectively, when the analysis was limited to the 52 countries in the tropical belt). These results indicate that routine influenza immunization efforts should be closely tailored to local patterns of viral circulation, rather than a country's hemispheric position.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Timing of the primary peak of influenza detection (2010–2014), by country, against the latitudinal position of the capital city.The size of points corresponds to the amplitude of influenza seasonality. Colors are used to highlight differences in peak timing. Arrows indicate the typical timing of delivery of the Southern Hemisphere (red) and Northern Hemisphere (blue) vaccines. Countries in the blue and red boxes should adopt the Northern and Southern Hemispheric vaccines, respectively. In each box the area with the darker background highlights countries that should opt for the vaccine recommended for the opposite hemisphere.
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f1: Timing of the primary peak of influenza detection (2010–2014), by country, against the latitudinal position of the capital city.The size of points corresponds to the amplitude of influenza seasonality. Colors are used to highlight differences in peak timing. Arrows indicate the typical timing of delivery of the Southern Hemisphere (red) and Northern Hemisphere (blue) vaccines. Countries in the blue and red boxes should adopt the Northern and Southern Hemispheric vaccines, respectively. In each box the area with the darker background highlights countries that should opt for the vaccine recommended for the opposite hemisphere.

Mentions: The timing of primary peaks obtained from the 2010–2014 influenza virus circulation time series of each country relative to their capital cities’ latitude is shown in Fig. 1. Overall, peak influenza circulation patterns in temperate countries were well aligned with the winter season - mostly between January and February in the Northern Hemisphere (blue and green circles above the northern tropical line in the figure), and July and August in the Southern Hemisphere (bright and dark orange circles below the Southern tropical line in the figure). Conversely, the timing of peak influenza activity in tropical countries had little regard for hemispheric position, and peak influenza activity was distributed unpredictably throughout the year.


A global map of hemispheric influenza vaccine recommendations based on local patterns of viral circulation.

Alonso WJ, Yu C, Viboud C, Richard SA, Schuck-Paim C, Simonsen L, Mello WA, Miller MA - Sci Rep (2015)

Timing of the primary peak of influenza detection (2010–2014), by country, against the latitudinal position of the capital city.The size of points corresponds to the amplitude of influenza seasonality. Colors are used to highlight differences in peak timing. Arrows indicate the typical timing of delivery of the Southern Hemisphere (red) and Northern Hemisphere (blue) vaccines. Countries in the blue and red boxes should adopt the Northern and Southern Hemispheric vaccines, respectively. In each box the area with the darker background highlights countries that should opt for the vaccine recommended for the opposite hemisphere.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664865&req=5

f1: Timing of the primary peak of influenza detection (2010–2014), by country, against the latitudinal position of the capital city.The size of points corresponds to the amplitude of influenza seasonality. Colors are used to highlight differences in peak timing. Arrows indicate the typical timing of delivery of the Southern Hemisphere (red) and Northern Hemisphere (blue) vaccines. Countries in the blue and red boxes should adopt the Northern and Southern Hemispheric vaccines, respectively. In each box the area with the darker background highlights countries that should opt for the vaccine recommended for the opposite hemisphere.
Mentions: The timing of primary peaks obtained from the 2010–2014 influenza virus circulation time series of each country relative to their capital cities’ latitude is shown in Fig. 1. Overall, peak influenza circulation patterns in temperate countries were well aligned with the winter season - mostly between January and February in the Northern Hemisphere (blue and green circles above the northern tropical line in the figure), and July and August in the Southern Hemisphere (bright and dark orange circles below the Southern tropical line in the figure). Conversely, the timing of peak influenza activity in tropical countries had little regard for hemispheric position, and peak influenza activity was distributed unpredictably throughout the year.

Bottom Line: Both the Northern and the Southern Hemisphere annual WHO influenza vaccine recommendations are designed to ensure vaccine delivery before the winter-time peak of viral circulation in each hemisphere.Influenza vaccine recommendations for respectively 25% and 39% of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere countries were out of phase with peak influenza circulation in their corresponding hemisphere (62% and 53%, respectively, when the analysis was limited to the 52 countries in the tropical belt).These results indicate that routine influenza immunization efforts should be closely tailored to local patterns of viral circulation, rather than a country's hemispheric position.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

ABSTRACT
Both the Northern and the Southern Hemisphere annual WHO influenza vaccine recommendations are designed to ensure vaccine delivery before the winter-time peak of viral circulation in each hemisphere. However, influenza seasonal patterns are highly diverse in tropical countries and may be out of phase with the WHO recommendations for their respective hemisphere. We modelled the peak timing of influenza activity for 125 countries using laboratory-based surveillance data from the WHO's FLUNET database and compared it with the influenza hemispheric recommendations in place. Influenza vaccine recommendations for respectively 25% and 39% of the Northern and Southern Hemisphere countries were out of phase with peak influenza circulation in their corresponding hemisphere (62% and 53%, respectively, when the analysis was limited to the 52 countries in the tropical belt). These results indicate that routine influenza immunization efforts should be closely tailored to local patterns of viral circulation, rather than a country's hemispheric position.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus