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Investigating trajectories of social recovery in individuals with first-episode psychosis: a latent class growth analysis.

Hodgekins J, Birchwood M, Christopher R, Marshall M, Coker S, Everard L, Lester H, Jones P, Amos T, Singh S, Sharma V, Freemantle N, Fowler D - Br J Psychiatry (2015)

Bottom Line: Social disability is a hallmark of severe mental illness yet individual differences and factors predicting outcome are largely unknown.Poor social recovery was predicted by male gender, ethnic minority status, younger age at onset of psychosis, increased negative symptoms, and poor premorbid adjustment.Where social disability is present on entry into EIP services it can remain stable, highlighting a need for targeted intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jo Hodgekins, BSc, PhD, ClinPsyD, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Max Birchwood, PhD, DSc, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, UK; Rose Christopher, BSc, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Max Marshall, MB BS, MD, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Sian Coker, BSc, DPhil, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Linda Everard, BSc, Birmingham and Solihull NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; Helen Lester, MB, BCH, MD (deceased), previously at the University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK; Peter Jones, PhD, FMedSci, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; Tim Amos, MB BS, MRCPsych, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Swaran Singh, MBBS, MD, FRCPsych, DM, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK; Vimal Sharma, MD, FRCPsych, PhD, University of Chester, Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; Nick Freemantle, MA, PhD, University College London, London; David Fowler, MSc, CPsychol, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Latent class growth analysis model with three social recovery trajectories.
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Figure 1: Latent class growth analysis model with three social recovery trajectories.

Mentions: Average class probabilities for the three-class model were high (0.84–0.94), indicating participants were correctly assigned to their respective latent classes. Convergence checks were conducted on the three-class model to ensure that it was not a local solution.18 Model estimates were replicated, suggesting a global solution and increasing the stability of the findings. Thus, a three-class model was chosen as the best fitting model and is illustrated in Fig. 1.


Investigating trajectories of social recovery in individuals with first-episode psychosis: a latent class growth analysis.

Hodgekins J, Birchwood M, Christopher R, Marshall M, Coker S, Everard L, Lester H, Jones P, Amos T, Singh S, Sharma V, Freemantle N, Fowler D - Br J Psychiatry (2015)

Latent class growth analysis model with three social recovery trajectories.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664858&req=5

Figure 1: Latent class growth analysis model with three social recovery trajectories.
Mentions: Average class probabilities for the three-class model were high (0.84–0.94), indicating participants were correctly assigned to their respective latent classes. Convergence checks were conducted on the three-class model to ensure that it was not a local solution.18 Model estimates were replicated, suggesting a global solution and increasing the stability of the findings. Thus, a three-class model was chosen as the best fitting model and is illustrated in Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Social disability is a hallmark of severe mental illness yet individual differences and factors predicting outcome are largely unknown.Poor social recovery was predicted by male gender, ethnic minority status, younger age at onset of psychosis, increased negative symptoms, and poor premorbid adjustment.Where social disability is present on entry into EIP services it can remain stable, highlighting a need for targeted intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jo Hodgekins, BSc, PhD, ClinPsyD, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Max Birchwood, PhD, DSc, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, UK; Rose Christopher, BSc, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Max Marshall, MB BS, MD, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Sian Coker, BSc, DPhil, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Linda Everard, BSc, Birmingham and Solihull NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK; Helen Lester, MB, BCH, MD (deceased), previously at the University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK; Peter Jones, PhD, FMedSci, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; Tim Amos, MB BS, MRCPsych, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; Swaran Singh, MBBS, MD, FRCPsych, DM, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK; Vimal Sharma, MD, FRCPsych, PhD, University of Chester, Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; Nick Freemantle, MA, PhD, University College London, London; David Fowler, MSc, CPsychol, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus