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CPT-11/bevacizumab for the treatment of refractory brain metastases in patients with HER2-neu-positive breast cancer.

Sengupta S, Rojas R, Mahadevan A, Kasper E, Jeyapalan S - Oxf Med Case Reports (2015)

Bottom Line: Nervous system relapse of patients with advanced HER2-neu-positive breast cancer is an increasing problem, with one-third of women developing brain metastases.Standard therapies using steroids, surgery and radiotherapy do not provide a lasting response.We evaluated CPT-11 and bevacizumab, which can both cross the blood-brain barrier, as combination therapy to treat HER2-neu-positive breast cancer with brain metastases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology , Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center , Boston, MA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Nervous system relapse of patients with advanced HER2-neu-positive breast cancer is an increasing problem, with one-third of women developing brain metastases. Standard therapies using steroids, surgery and radiotherapy do not provide a lasting response. We evaluated CPT-11 and bevacizumab, which can both cross the blood-brain barrier, as combination therapy to treat HER2-neu-positive breast cancer with brain metastases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient 4: MRI scans post contrast shown pre- and post-treatment. Pre- and post-treatment scans were taken ∼5 months apart.
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OMV010F4: Patient 4: MRI scans post contrast shown pre- and post-treatment. Pre- and post-treatment scans were taken ∼5 months apart.

Mentions: All of the patients had both clinical and MRI radiographic response to treatment (Figs 1–4). Median TTP was 8.5 months and median OS was 11 months. The predicted chance of six-month survival for each of the four patients was only 10% [1]. Our observed median TTP and median OS are an objective measure of a successful response to this salvage treatment strategy. All of the patients died within six months of stopping their treatment (range 1–6 months, median = 2 months). Hematological grade 3/4 toxicities were only that of lymphopenia (2/4). Treatment-related non-hematologic grade 3/4 toxicities were: fatigue (2/4), alopecia (1/4) and diarrhea (1/4).Figure 1:


CPT-11/bevacizumab for the treatment of refractory brain metastases in patients with HER2-neu-positive breast cancer.

Sengupta S, Rojas R, Mahadevan A, Kasper E, Jeyapalan S - Oxf Med Case Reports (2015)

Patient 4: MRI scans post contrast shown pre- and post-treatment. Pre- and post-treatment scans were taken ∼5 months apart.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664841&req=5

OMV010F4: Patient 4: MRI scans post contrast shown pre- and post-treatment. Pre- and post-treatment scans were taken ∼5 months apart.
Mentions: All of the patients had both clinical and MRI radiographic response to treatment (Figs 1–4). Median TTP was 8.5 months and median OS was 11 months. The predicted chance of six-month survival for each of the four patients was only 10% [1]. Our observed median TTP and median OS are an objective measure of a successful response to this salvage treatment strategy. All of the patients died within six months of stopping their treatment (range 1–6 months, median = 2 months). Hematological grade 3/4 toxicities were only that of lymphopenia (2/4). Treatment-related non-hematologic grade 3/4 toxicities were: fatigue (2/4), alopecia (1/4) and diarrhea (1/4).Figure 1:

Bottom Line: Nervous system relapse of patients with advanced HER2-neu-positive breast cancer is an increasing problem, with one-third of women developing brain metastases.Standard therapies using steroids, surgery and radiotherapy do not provide a lasting response.We evaluated CPT-11 and bevacizumab, which can both cross the blood-brain barrier, as combination therapy to treat HER2-neu-positive breast cancer with brain metastases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology , Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center , Boston, MA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Nervous system relapse of patients with advanced HER2-neu-positive breast cancer is an increasing problem, with one-third of women developing brain metastases. Standard therapies using steroids, surgery and radiotherapy do not provide a lasting response. We evaluated CPT-11 and bevacizumab, which can both cross the blood-brain barrier, as combination therapy to treat HER2-neu-positive breast cancer with brain metastases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus