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Rhythm and Attention: Does the Beat Position of a Visual or Auditory Regular Pulse Modulate T2 Detection in the Attentional Blink?

Bermeitinger C, Frings C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: We found large AB effects.However, the rhythm did not modulate the AB.Our experiments suggest that oscillatory cycling attention does not affect temporal selection as tapped in the AB paradigm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Hildesheim Hildesheim, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The attentional blink (AB) is one impressive demonstration of limited attentional capacities in time: a second target (T2) is often missed when it should be detected within 200-600 ms after a first target. According to the dynamic attending theory, attention cycles oscillatory. Regular rhythms (i.e., pulses) should evoke expectations regarding the point of the next occurrence of a tone/element in the rhythm. At this point, more attentional resources should be provided. Thus, if rhythmic information can be used to optimize attentional release, we assume a modulation of the AB when an additional rhythm is given. We tested this idea in two experiments with a visual (Experiment 1) or an auditory (Experiment 2) rhythm. We found large AB effects. However, the rhythm did not modulate the AB. If the rhythm had an influence at all, then Experiment 2 showed that an auditory rhythm (or stimulus) falling on T2 might generally boost visual processing, irrespective of attentional resources as indexed by the AB paradigm. Our experiments suggest that oscillatory cycling attention does not affect temporal selection as tapped in the AB paradigm.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T2 detection rate (in %, for trials with correct T1 identification and when the T2 probe was present) in Experiment 2 with an auditory rhythm, depending on lag and position of the critical cue stimulus. Bars indicate the standard error of the mean.
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Figure 3: T2 detection rate (in %, for trials with correct T1 identification and when the T2 probe was present) in Experiment 2 with an auditory rhythm, depending on lag and position of the critical cue stimulus. Bars indicate the standard error of the mean.

Mentions: The main effect of “position of critical cue stimulus” was not significant, F(3, 126) = 1.64, p = 0.18. However, the planned contrast showed that T2 detection was marginally better if the critical cue stimulus appeared at T2 position compared to the other positions, F(1, 42) = 3.77, p = 0.059. This revealed a tendency for enhanced attention when the critical cue stimulus appeared at T2. The interaction effect was not significant, F < 1, p > 0.54. That is, the rhythm had—if at all—a general effect on T2 detection, but was not able to modulate the AB. Figure 3 clearly shows that, especially at lag 3, there was no difference between the positions at which the critical cue stimulus appeared.


Rhythm and Attention: Does the Beat Position of a Visual or Auditory Regular Pulse Modulate T2 Detection in the Attentional Blink?

Bermeitinger C, Frings C - Front Psychol (2015)

T2 detection rate (in %, for trials with correct T1 identification and when the T2 probe was present) in Experiment 2 with an auditory rhythm, depending on lag and position of the critical cue stimulus. Bars indicate the standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664834&req=5

Figure 3: T2 detection rate (in %, for trials with correct T1 identification and when the T2 probe was present) in Experiment 2 with an auditory rhythm, depending on lag and position of the critical cue stimulus. Bars indicate the standard error of the mean.
Mentions: The main effect of “position of critical cue stimulus” was not significant, F(3, 126) = 1.64, p = 0.18. However, the planned contrast showed that T2 detection was marginally better if the critical cue stimulus appeared at T2 position compared to the other positions, F(1, 42) = 3.77, p = 0.059. This revealed a tendency for enhanced attention when the critical cue stimulus appeared at T2. The interaction effect was not significant, F < 1, p > 0.54. That is, the rhythm had—if at all—a general effect on T2 detection, but was not able to modulate the AB. Figure 3 clearly shows that, especially at lag 3, there was no difference between the positions at which the critical cue stimulus appeared.

Bottom Line: We found large AB effects.However, the rhythm did not modulate the AB.Our experiments suggest that oscillatory cycling attention does not affect temporal selection as tapped in the AB paradigm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Hildesheim Hildesheim, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The attentional blink (AB) is one impressive demonstration of limited attentional capacities in time: a second target (T2) is often missed when it should be detected within 200-600 ms after a first target. According to the dynamic attending theory, attention cycles oscillatory. Regular rhythms (i.e., pulses) should evoke expectations regarding the point of the next occurrence of a tone/element in the rhythm. At this point, more attentional resources should be provided. Thus, if rhythmic information can be used to optimize attentional release, we assume a modulation of the AB when an additional rhythm is given. We tested this idea in two experiments with a visual (Experiment 1) or an auditory (Experiment 2) rhythm. We found large AB effects. However, the rhythm did not modulate the AB. If the rhythm had an influence at all, then Experiment 2 showed that an auditory rhythm (or stimulus) falling on T2 might generally boost visual processing, irrespective of attentional resources as indexed by the AB paradigm. Our experiments suggest that oscillatory cycling attention does not affect temporal selection as tapped in the AB paradigm.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus