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The Effects of High-Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Dental Professionals with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

Suh HR, Kim TH, Han GS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs) have a significant issue for dental professionals.Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task.The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05) as compared to the placebo group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Neuroscience Research Institute, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs) have a significant issue for dental professionals. This study investigated the effects of high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on work-related pain, fatigue, and the active range of motion in dental professionals. Among recruited 47 dental professionals with WMSDs, 24 subjects received high-frequency TENS (the TENS group), while 23 subjects received placebo stimulation (the placebo group). TENS was applied to the muscle trigger points of the levator scapulae and upper trapezius, while placebo-TENS was administered without electrical stimulation during 60 min. Pain and fatigue at rest and during movement were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain pressure threshold (PPT), and active range of motion (AROM) of horizontal head rotation at six time points: prelabor, postlabor, post-TENS, and at 1 h, 3 h, and 1 day after TENS application. Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task. The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05) as compared to the placebo group. A single session high-frequency TENS may immediately reduce symptoms related to WMSDs in dental professionals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental flow-diagram in this study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Experimental flow-diagram in this study.

Mentions: A total of 50 participants volunteered for this study at initial recruitment. Three participants were not included for the following reasons: two participants did not satisfy the selection criteria and one failed to comply with the intervention for personal reasons. All experiment processes are shown in Figure 1. The participants were randomly assigned to the TENS group (n = 24) as the experimental group or the placebo-TENS group (n = 23) as the control group using a random allocation software by an independent examiner who was not involved in participant recruitment.


The Effects of High-Frequency Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Dental Professionals with Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

Suh HR, Kim TH, Han GS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Experimental flow-diagram in this study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664811&req=5

fig1: Experimental flow-diagram in this study.
Mentions: A total of 50 participants volunteered for this study at initial recruitment. Three participants were not included for the following reasons: two participants did not satisfy the selection criteria and one failed to comply with the intervention for personal reasons. All experiment processes are shown in Figure 1. The participants were randomly assigned to the TENS group (n = 24) as the experimental group or the placebo-TENS group (n = 23) as the control group using a random allocation software by an independent examiner who was not involved in participant recruitment.

Bottom Line: Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs) have a significant issue for dental professionals.Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task.The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05) as compared to the placebo group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Neuroscience Research Institute, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Work-related musculoskeletal symptom disorders (WMSDs) have a significant issue for dental professionals. This study investigated the effects of high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on work-related pain, fatigue, and the active range of motion in dental professionals. Among recruited 47 dental professionals with WMSDs, 24 subjects received high-frequency TENS (the TENS group), while 23 subjects received placebo stimulation (the placebo group). TENS was applied to the muscle trigger points of the levator scapulae and upper trapezius, while placebo-TENS was administered without electrical stimulation during 60 min. Pain and fatigue at rest and during movement were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain pressure threshold (PPT), and active range of motion (AROM) of horizontal head rotation at six time points: prelabor, postlabor, post-TENS, and at 1 h, 3 h, and 1 day after TENS application. Both groups showed significantly increased pain and fatigue and decreased PPT and AROM after completing a work task. The TENS group showed significantly greater improvements in VAS score, fatigue, PPT, and AROM at post-TENS and at 1 h and 3 h after application (all P < 0.05) as compared to the placebo group. A single session high-frequency TENS may immediately reduce symptoms related to WMSDs in dental professionals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus