Limits...
Scrotal Lipomatosis Mimicking Varicocele: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Turkan S, Kalkan M, Şahin C - Case Rep Urol (2015)

Bottom Line: Some information suggests that this disease may be associated with infertility.It is characterized by pain-free scrotal swelling.Here, we present this rare case with a literature review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Private Anadolu Hospital, Department of Urology, Kastamonu, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Scrotal lipomatosis is a rarely seen disease with an etiology that is not fully understood. Some information suggests that this disease may be associated with infertility. It is characterized by pain-free scrotal swelling. In this study, we reported a scrotal lipomatosis case presenting due to infertility and pain-free scrotal swelling. It was operated on with the initial diagnosis of varicocele, but once fatty tissue was observed in the scrotum, the case was diagnosed as scrotal lipomatosis. Here, we present this rare case with a literature review.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Observed fatty tissue beginning from the outlet of the inguinal channel and outside testicle into the scrotum in operative image.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664782&req=5

fig1: Observed fatty tissue beginning from the outlet of the inguinal channel and outside testicle into the scrotum in operative image.

Mentions: A 34-year-old male patient who had had unprotected marital relations for two years presented to our clinic due to swelling in the left scrotum in addition to infertility. On physical examination, both the testicles were found to be localized in the scrotum with normal consistency and size. Soft tissues with elastic consistency were observed in the left part of the scrotum by means of transillumination, and these could not be reduced without pain. The presentation was thought to be compatible with Grade 3 varicocele. On nondestructive sperm analysis, the number of sperms was found to be 11 million/cc, the ratio of motile sperm within the first 30 minutes was found to be 15%, and the proportion with normal morphological structure according to the Kruger strict criteria was found to be 4%. The patient's body mass index (BMI) was 32 kg/m2. Upon exploration with a low inguinal incision, the soft tissue was understood not to be a varicocele but was observed to be a fatty tissue beginning from the outlet of the inguinal channel and outside testicle expanding into the scrotum (Figure 1). When the testicle and paratesticular tissues were removed, the testicle was found to be normal. The fatty tissue was readily separated from the testicle and the attachments and was completely excised (Figure 2). On pathological examination, it was understood to be a mature fatty tissue without observable cellular atypia or areas of necrosis. No pathology was seen in bilateral scrotal examination in postoperative second week. Control sperm analysis in postoperative 6 months was seen similar to preoperative values (the number of sperm: 11 million/cc, the ratio of motile sperm within the first 30 minutes: 15%, and normal morphological structure according to the Kruger strict criteria: 4%).


Scrotal Lipomatosis Mimicking Varicocele: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Turkan S, Kalkan M, Şahin C - Case Rep Urol (2015)

Observed fatty tissue beginning from the outlet of the inguinal channel and outside testicle into the scrotum in operative image.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664782&req=5

fig1: Observed fatty tissue beginning from the outlet of the inguinal channel and outside testicle into the scrotum in operative image.
Mentions: A 34-year-old male patient who had had unprotected marital relations for two years presented to our clinic due to swelling in the left scrotum in addition to infertility. On physical examination, both the testicles were found to be localized in the scrotum with normal consistency and size. Soft tissues with elastic consistency were observed in the left part of the scrotum by means of transillumination, and these could not be reduced without pain. The presentation was thought to be compatible with Grade 3 varicocele. On nondestructive sperm analysis, the number of sperms was found to be 11 million/cc, the ratio of motile sperm within the first 30 minutes was found to be 15%, and the proportion with normal morphological structure according to the Kruger strict criteria was found to be 4%. The patient's body mass index (BMI) was 32 kg/m2. Upon exploration with a low inguinal incision, the soft tissue was understood not to be a varicocele but was observed to be a fatty tissue beginning from the outlet of the inguinal channel and outside testicle expanding into the scrotum (Figure 1). When the testicle and paratesticular tissues were removed, the testicle was found to be normal. The fatty tissue was readily separated from the testicle and the attachments and was completely excised (Figure 2). On pathological examination, it was understood to be a mature fatty tissue without observable cellular atypia or areas of necrosis. No pathology was seen in bilateral scrotal examination in postoperative second week. Control sperm analysis in postoperative 6 months was seen similar to preoperative values (the number of sperm: 11 million/cc, the ratio of motile sperm within the first 30 minutes: 15%, and normal morphological structure according to the Kruger strict criteria: 4%).

Bottom Line: Some information suggests that this disease may be associated with infertility.It is characterized by pain-free scrotal swelling.Here, we present this rare case with a literature review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Private Anadolu Hospital, Department of Urology, Kastamonu, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Scrotal lipomatosis is a rarely seen disease with an etiology that is not fully understood. Some information suggests that this disease may be associated with infertility. It is characterized by pain-free scrotal swelling. In this study, we reported a scrotal lipomatosis case presenting due to infertility and pain-free scrotal swelling. It was operated on with the initial diagnosis of varicocele, but once fatty tissue was observed in the scrotum, the case was diagnosed as scrotal lipomatosis. Here, we present this rare case with a literature review.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus