Limits...
Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model.

Harrison BJ, Venkat G, Hutson T, Rau KK, Bunge MB, Mendell LM, Gage FH, Johnson RD, Hill C, Rouchka EC, Moon L, Petruska JC - Genom Data (2015)

Bottom Line: Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process.This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact ("naïve") sensory ganglia.Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, United States ; Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC), University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, United States ; Kentucky Biomedical Research Infrastructure Network Bioinformatics Core, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, United States.

ABSTRACT
Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]). In the model used here (the "spared dermatome" model), the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact ("naïve") sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental Design. A) Schematic of the cross-sectional neuroanatomy of the thoracic region of the rat. The DRG is the structure in which the cell bodies of spinal sensory neurons are housed and which was used for microarray. Continuous with the DRG are the structures carrying the axon-branches of the sensory neurons: the dorsal root carrying axons into the spinal cord, and the spinal nerve (or nerve root in human clinical terms) carrying axons out to their peripheral target tissues. B) (Top) Schematic representation of the surgical preparation for the spared dermatome model, showing dorsal cutaneous nerve only (T = thoracic). (Middle, bottom) Mockup representation of the denervated and spared dermatomes, and the expansion of the spared T11 dermatome into the denervated dermatomes by collateral sprouting of the T11 sensory neurons. Black dots represent sensitive (i.e., innervated) areas of skin as defined by activation of the CTM reflex and the yellow/green shaded areas represent areas of denervation induced by axotomy of the T9, T10, T12 and T13 Dorsal and Lateral Cutaneous nerves which become re-innervated by expansion of spared T11 axons by 28 days. C) Graph of the reduction over time in the denervated area of skin (i.e., successful reinnervation by collateral sprouting). n = 6; error bars are SD.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664766&req=5

f0005: Experimental Design. A) Schematic of the cross-sectional neuroanatomy of the thoracic region of the rat. The DRG is the structure in which the cell bodies of spinal sensory neurons are housed and which was used for microarray. Continuous with the DRG are the structures carrying the axon-branches of the sensory neurons: the dorsal root carrying axons into the spinal cord, and the spinal nerve (or nerve root in human clinical terms) carrying axons out to their peripheral target tissues. B) (Top) Schematic representation of the surgical preparation for the spared dermatome model, showing dorsal cutaneous nerve only (T = thoracic). (Middle, bottom) Mockup representation of the denervated and spared dermatomes, and the expansion of the spared T11 dermatome into the denervated dermatomes by collateral sprouting of the T11 sensory neurons. Black dots represent sensitive (i.e., innervated) areas of skin as defined by activation of the CTM reflex and the yellow/green shaded areas represent areas of denervation induced by axotomy of the T9, T10, T12 and T13 Dorsal and Lateral Cutaneous nerves which become re-innervated by expansion of spared T11 axons by 28 days. C) Graph of the reduction over time in the denervated area of skin (i.e., successful reinnervation by collateral sprouting). n = 6; error bars are SD.

Mentions: All surgical procedures were performed in accordance with published NIH Guidelines and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Stony Brook University and the University of Louisville (sites where animal work was performed). In this study, we sought to identify gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting. The experiments were designed to discover global gene expression changes in non-injured DRG neurons undergoing collateral sprouting. Collateral sprouting was induced using the “spared dermatome” model [dermatome is the neuroanatomical term for the area of skin innervated by a single spinal segment]. The focus of the study was the left-side dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of the 11th Thoracic spinal segment (T11). Adult female Sprague–Dawley rats (260–310 g) were anesthetized with pentobarbital (65 mg/kg, i.p.). Left-side T11 DRG neurons remained intact and underwent collateral sprouting after the left-side Dorsal and Lateral cutaneous nerves (DCn and LCn) of the adjacent segments (T9, T10, T12, and T13) were cut and ligated (to prevent regeneration) (Fig. 1A). Thus, the T9, T10, T12, and T13 dermatomes were denervated, but the T11 dermatome remained intact. Axons of the T11 dermatome (and thus derived from the T11 DRG), extended new branches to innervate the T9, T10, T12, and T13 dermatomes (Fig. 1B). [N.B.: This is NOT a spared root experiment. ALL spinal roots were non-injured. Peripheral nerves were used.] The acute denervation was confirmed using the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to pinch [11], [12], [13]. The CTMR could be evoked from innervated areas but not from areas whose innervation had been cut. Thus, the border between innervated (i.e., T11 dermatome) and denervated (i.e., T9, 10, 12, 13 dermatomes) could be defined. Control for a negative CTMR response due to anesthesia levels was the presence of CTMR to pinch of non-denervated skin (T11 dermatome or contralateral side). When cutaneous axons expanded into denervated skin by collateral sprouting, so did the area of skin from which a CTM reflex could be evoked by pinch. Collateral sprouting-mediated expansion of the innervation over time was monitored using the CTMR to map the border between innervated and denervated skin regions. Collateral sprouting progressed as previously described [14], with expansion barely-detectible in some of the rats by 7 days, but easily detectible in all rats by 14 days. Temporal progression of this process from a separate set of animals is exemplified in Fig. 1C.


Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model.

Harrison BJ, Venkat G, Hutson T, Rau KK, Bunge MB, Mendell LM, Gage FH, Johnson RD, Hill C, Rouchka EC, Moon L, Petruska JC - Genom Data (2015)

Experimental Design. A) Schematic of the cross-sectional neuroanatomy of the thoracic region of the rat. The DRG is the structure in which the cell bodies of spinal sensory neurons are housed and which was used for microarray. Continuous with the DRG are the structures carrying the axon-branches of the sensory neurons: the dorsal root carrying axons into the spinal cord, and the spinal nerve (or nerve root in human clinical terms) carrying axons out to their peripheral target tissues. B) (Top) Schematic representation of the surgical preparation for the spared dermatome model, showing dorsal cutaneous nerve only (T = thoracic). (Middle, bottom) Mockup representation of the denervated and spared dermatomes, and the expansion of the spared T11 dermatome into the denervated dermatomes by collateral sprouting of the T11 sensory neurons. Black dots represent sensitive (i.e., innervated) areas of skin as defined by activation of the CTM reflex and the yellow/green shaded areas represent areas of denervation induced by axotomy of the T9, T10, T12 and T13 Dorsal and Lateral Cutaneous nerves which become re-innervated by expansion of spared T11 axons by 28 days. C) Graph of the reduction over time in the denervated area of skin (i.e., successful reinnervation by collateral sprouting). n = 6; error bars are SD.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664766&req=5

f0005: Experimental Design. A) Schematic of the cross-sectional neuroanatomy of the thoracic region of the rat. The DRG is the structure in which the cell bodies of spinal sensory neurons are housed and which was used for microarray. Continuous with the DRG are the structures carrying the axon-branches of the sensory neurons: the dorsal root carrying axons into the spinal cord, and the spinal nerve (or nerve root in human clinical terms) carrying axons out to their peripheral target tissues. B) (Top) Schematic representation of the surgical preparation for the spared dermatome model, showing dorsal cutaneous nerve only (T = thoracic). (Middle, bottom) Mockup representation of the denervated and spared dermatomes, and the expansion of the spared T11 dermatome into the denervated dermatomes by collateral sprouting of the T11 sensory neurons. Black dots represent sensitive (i.e., innervated) areas of skin as defined by activation of the CTM reflex and the yellow/green shaded areas represent areas of denervation induced by axotomy of the T9, T10, T12 and T13 Dorsal and Lateral Cutaneous nerves which become re-innervated by expansion of spared T11 axons by 28 days. C) Graph of the reduction over time in the denervated area of skin (i.e., successful reinnervation by collateral sprouting). n = 6; error bars are SD.
Mentions: All surgical procedures were performed in accordance with published NIH Guidelines and the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of Stony Brook University and the University of Louisville (sites where animal work was performed). In this study, we sought to identify gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting. The experiments were designed to discover global gene expression changes in non-injured DRG neurons undergoing collateral sprouting. Collateral sprouting was induced using the “spared dermatome” model [dermatome is the neuroanatomical term for the area of skin innervated by a single spinal segment]. The focus of the study was the left-side dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of the 11th Thoracic spinal segment (T11). Adult female Sprague–Dawley rats (260–310 g) were anesthetized with pentobarbital (65 mg/kg, i.p.). Left-side T11 DRG neurons remained intact and underwent collateral sprouting after the left-side Dorsal and Lateral cutaneous nerves (DCn and LCn) of the adjacent segments (T9, T10, T12, and T13) were cut and ligated (to prevent regeneration) (Fig. 1A). Thus, the T9, T10, T12, and T13 dermatomes were denervated, but the T11 dermatome remained intact. Axons of the T11 dermatome (and thus derived from the T11 DRG), extended new branches to innervate the T9, T10, T12, and T13 dermatomes (Fig. 1B). [N.B.: This is NOT a spared root experiment. ALL spinal roots were non-injured. Peripheral nerves were used.] The acute denervation was confirmed using the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to pinch [11], [12], [13]. The CTMR could be evoked from innervated areas but not from areas whose innervation had been cut. Thus, the border between innervated (i.e., T11 dermatome) and denervated (i.e., T9, 10, 12, 13 dermatomes) could be defined. Control for a negative CTMR response due to anesthesia levels was the presence of CTMR to pinch of non-denervated skin (T11 dermatome or contralateral side). When cutaneous axons expanded into denervated skin by collateral sprouting, so did the area of skin from which a CTM reflex could be evoked by pinch. Collateral sprouting-mediated expansion of the innervation over time was monitored using the CTMR to map the border between innervated and denervated skin regions. Collateral sprouting progressed as previously described [14], with expansion barely-detectible in some of the rats by 7 days, but easily detectible in all rats by 14 days. Temporal progression of this process from a separate set of animals is exemplified in Fig. 1C.

Bottom Line: Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process.This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact ("naïve") sensory ganglia.Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, United States ; Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC), University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, United States ; Kentucky Biomedical Research Infrastructure Network Bioinformatics Core, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, United States.

ABSTRACT
Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]). In the model used here (the "spared dermatome" model), the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days) and maintenance (14 days) phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact ("naïve") sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus