Limits...
Prevalence of Cam Morphology in Females with Femoroacetabular Impingement.

Levy DM, Hellman MD, Harris JD, Haughom B, Frank RM, Nho SJ - Front Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: The intraclass correlation coefficient for α-angle measurements was 0.84.Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle >42°.As the majority of revision hip arthroscopies are performed due to incomplete cam correction, hip arthroscopists need to be cognizant of and potentially surgically address these subtle lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hip Preservation Center, Rush University Medical Center , Chicago, IL , USA.

ABSTRACT
Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. Cam morphology is commonly assessed with the alpha angle, measured on radiographs. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of cam morphology utilizing the alpha angle in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author's clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Alpha (α) angles were measured on anteroposterior and lateral (Dunn 90°, cross-table lateral, and/or frog-leg lateral) plain radiographs by two blinded physicians, and the largest measured angle was used. Using Gosvig et al.'s classification, alpha angle was characterized as (pathologic > 57°), borderline (51-56°), subtle (46-50°), very subtle (43-45°), or normal (≤42°). Three hundred and ninety-one patients (438 hips) were analyzed (age 36.2 ± 12.3 years). Among the hips included, 35.6% were normal, 14.6% pathologic, 15.1% borderline, 14.6% subtle, and 20.1% very subtle. There was no correlation between alpha angle and patient age (R = 0.17) or body mass index (R = 0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient for α-angle measurements was 0.84. Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle >42°. Subtle cam deformity plays a significant role in the pathoanatomy of female patients with symptomatic FAI. As the majority of revision hip arthroscopies are performed due to incomplete cam correction, hip arthroscopists need to be cognizant of and potentially surgically address these subtle lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Determination of head–neck offset by measurement of the α angle on AP (A) and 90°-Dunn lateral (B) radiographs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664725&req=5

Figure 1: Determination of head–neck offset by measurement of the α angle on AP (A) and 90°-Dunn lateral (B) radiographs.

Mentions: Radiographs were reviewed retrospectively. Tönnis grades were documented and α angles measured on all AP-pelvis and lateral radiographs as described by Notzli et al. (Figure 1) (9). The center of the femoral head, the central axis of the femoral neck, and the resultant α angle were determined using measurement tools available in the MedVIEW Picture Archive Communication System (PACS) software (Aspyra, West Lake Village, CA, USA). Lateral views included frog-leg lateral, cross-table lateral, and/or 90°-Dunn lateral positioning. The largest α angle was used. For each subject, demographic data, including age, ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI), was collected. In order to evaluate the prevalence of cam-type deformity, all patients were classified according to the criteria defined by Gosvig et al. (pathologic > 57° and borderline 51–56°) (21). Additionally, patients were classified as having subtle (46–50°) or very subtle (43–45°) cam morphologies. Normal α angles were defined as ≤42°(9).


Prevalence of Cam Morphology in Females with Femoroacetabular Impingement.

Levy DM, Hellman MD, Harris JD, Haughom B, Frank RM, Nho SJ - Front Surg (2015)

Determination of head–neck offset by measurement of the α angle on AP (A) and 90°-Dunn lateral (B) radiographs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664725&req=5

Figure 1: Determination of head–neck offset by measurement of the α angle on AP (A) and 90°-Dunn lateral (B) radiographs.
Mentions: Radiographs were reviewed retrospectively. Tönnis grades were documented and α angles measured on all AP-pelvis and lateral radiographs as described by Notzli et al. (Figure 1) (9). The center of the femoral head, the central axis of the femoral neck, and the resultant α angle were determined using measurement tools available in the MedVIEW Picture Archive Communication System (PACS) software (Aspyra, West Lake Village, CA, USA). Lateral views included frog-leg lateral, cross-table lateral, and/or 90°-Dunn lateral positioning. The largest α angle was used. For each subject, demographic data, including age, ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI), was collected. In order to evaluate the prevalence of cam-type deformity, all patients were classified according to the criteria defined by Gosvig et al. (pathologic > 57° and borderline 51–56°) (21). Additionally, patients were classified as having subtle (46–50°) or very subtle (43–45°) cam morphologies. Normal α angles were defined as ≤42°(9).

Bottom Line: The intraclass correlation coefficient for α-angle measurements was 0.84.Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle >42°.As the majority of revision hip arthroscopies are performed due to incomplete cam correction, hip arthroscopists need to be cognizant of and potentially surgically address these subtle lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hip Preservation Center, Rush University Medical Center , Chicago, IL , USA.

ABSTRACT
Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. Cam morphology is commonly assessed with the alpha angle, measured on radiographs. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of cam morphology utilizing the alpha angle in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author's clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Alpha (α) angles were measured on anteroposterior and lateral (Dunn 90°, cross-table lateral, and/or frog-leg lateral) plain radiographs by two blinded physicians, and the largest measured angle was used. Using Gosvig et al.'s classification, alpha angle was characterized as (pathologic > 57°), borderline (51-56°), subtle (46-50°), very subtle (43-45°), or normal (≤42°). Three hundred and ninety-one patients (438 hips) were analyzed (age 36.2 ± 12.3 years). Among the hips included, 35.6% were normal, 14.6% pathologic, 15.1% borderline, 14.6% subtle, and 20.1% very subtle. There was no correlation between alpha angle and patient age (R = 0.17) or body mass index (R = 0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient for α-angle measurements was 0.84. Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle >42°. Subtle cam deformity plays a significant role in the pathoanatomy of female patients with symptomatic FAI. As the majority of revision hip arthroscopies are performed due to incomplete cam correction, hip arthroscopists need to be cognizant of and potentially surgically address these subtle lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus