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Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

Thomas SS, Makar KW, Li L, Zheng Y, Yang P, Levy L, Rudolph RY, Lampe PD, Yan M, Markowitz SD, Bigler J, Lampe JW, Potter JD - Genom Data (2015)

Bottom Line: Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence.UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia.Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

ABSTRACT
Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of participant enrollment and study design.
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f0005: Flow chart of participant enrollment and study design.

Mentions: We recruited healthy men and women, ages 20 to 45 years, from the greater Seattle area between June 2003 and March 2007. Participants were recruited from among those who completed a cross-sectional study of diet and aspirin metabolism (Fig. 1). Potential eligibility was assessed by questionnaire. Exclusion criteria included tobacco use, consumption of > 2 alcoholic beverages/day (equivalent to 720 ml beer, 240 ml wine, 90 ml hard liquor), regular use of prescription or over-the-counter medications, known intolerance of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), weight loss or gain of > 4.5 kg in the past year, current or planned pregnancy, breastfeeding, bleeding disorder, anemia, renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction (e.g., cirrhosis, hepatitis, abnormal liver function tests), chronic lung disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina, recent myocardial infarction, history of endocarditis, aortic or iliac aneurysm, history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, diabetes, recent pelvic surgery, history of gastrointestinal disorder (e.g., gastric or duodenal ulcer, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, celiac sprue, HNPCC, familial adenomatous polyposis, pancreatic disease, previous gastrointestinal resection, radiation or chemotherapy) and cancer (other than non-melanoma skin cancer).


Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

Thomas SS, Makar KW, Li L, Zheng Y, Yang P, Levy L, Rudolph RY, Lampe PD, Yan M, Markowitz SD, Bigler J, Lampe JW, Potter JD - Genom Data (2015)

Flow chart of participant enrollment and study design.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664722&req=5

f0005: Flow chart of participant enrollment and study design.
Mentions: We recruited healthy men and women, ages 20 to 45 years, from the greater Seattle area between June 2003 and March 2007. Participants were recruited from among those who completed a cross-sectional study of diet and aspirin metabolism (Fig. 1). Potential eligibility was assessed by questionnaire. Exclusion criteria included tobacco use, consumption of > 2 alcoholic beverages/day (equivalent to 720 ml beer, 240 ml wine, 90 ml hard liquor), regular use of prescription or over-the-counter medications, known intolerance of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), weight loss or gain of > 4.5 kg in the past year, current or planned pregnancy, breastfeeding, bleeding disorder, anemia, renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction (e.g., cirrhosis, hepatitis, abnormal liver function tests), chronic lung disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina, recent myocardial infarction, history of endocarditis, aortic or iliac aneurysm, history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, diabetes, recent pelvic surgery, history of gastrointestinal disorder (e.g., gastric or duodenal ulcer, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, celiac sprue, HNPCC, familial adenomatous polyposis, pancreatic disease, previous gastrointestinal resection, radiation or chemotherapy) and cancer (other than non-melanoma skin cancer).

Bottom Line: Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence.UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia.Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

ABSTRACT
Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus