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Candida albicans exhibits enhanced alkaline and temperature induction of Efg1-regulated transcripts relative to Candida dubliniensis.

Caplice N, Moran GP - Genom Data (2015)

Bottom Line: Filamentous growth is an important virulence trait of the human pathogenic fungi within the genus Candida, and the greater propensity of C. albicans to form hyphae has been proposed to account for the greater virulence of this species relative to the less pathogenic species C. dubliniensis.We could identify conserved core temperature and pH responses, however many signature Efg1-regulated, hypha-induced transcripts (e.g. ECE1, HWP1) exhibited reduced or lack of induction in C. dubliniensis.Comparison of the activity of the HWP1 and ECE1 promoters in both species using GFP fusions showed a lag in serum induced fluorescence in C. dubliniensis relative to C. albicans and nutrient depletion was required for maximal expression of these Efg1-regulated transcripts in C. dubliniensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microbiology Research Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental University Hospital, University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Filamentous growth is an important virulence trait of the human pathogenic fungi within the genus Candida, and the greater propensity of C. albicans to form hyphae has been proposed to account for the greater virulence of this species relative to the less pathogenic species C. dubliniensis. In this meta-analysis, we compare the transcriptional response of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans to the individual environmental stimuli that shape the gene expression profiles during filamentation in 10% serum, namely alkaline pH, 37 °C and reduced cell density. We could identify conserved core temperature and pH responses, however many signature Efg1-regulated, hypha-induced transcripts (e.g. ECE1, HWP1) exhibited reduced or lack of induction in C. dubliniensis. Comparison of the activity of the HWP1 and ECE1 promoters in both species using GFP fusions showed a lag in serum induced fluorescence in C. dubliniensis relative to C. albicans and nutrient depletion was required for maximal expression of these Efg1-regulated transcripts in C. dubliniensis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hypha formation by C. dubliniensis Wü284 in Lee's medium. Cells grown overnight in YPD broth at 30 °C were inoculated in 2 ml Lee's medium (1 × 106 cells) in the well of a 6-well tissue culture dish. The proportion of germ-tube forming cells was assessed hourly using an inverted microscope. Lee's medium was used at standard concentration or diluted to 10% (v/v) standard concentration to induce nutrient depletion.
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f0005: Hypha formation by C. dubliniensis Wü284 in Lee's medium. Cells grown overnight in YPD broth at 30 °C were inoculated in 2 ml Lee's medium (1 × 106 cells) in the well of a 6-well tissue culture dish. The proportion of germ-tube forming cells was assessed hourly using an inverted microscope. Lee's medium was used at standard concentration or diluted to 10% (v/v) standard concentration to induce nutrient depletion.

Mentions: In C. albicans, a shift to alkaline pH and 37 °C is sufficient to induce hypha formation in vitro in nutrient rich culture media [22]. Using Lee's medium as a defined basal medium, we independently examined the role of temperature, pH and nutrient depletion in true hypha formation in C. dubliniensis. Following a shift from Lee's medium pH 4.5 at 30 °C to Lee's medium pH 7.2 at 37 °C, less than 50% of C. dubliniensis cells had formed germ-tubes following 5 h incubation. In contrast, in nutrient depleted (10% v/v) Lee's pH 7.2 at 37 °C, > 95% of cells formed germ-tubes by 5 h. Shifts to 37 °C or pH 7.2 alone in nutrient depleted (10% v/v) Lee's resulted in transient germ-tube formation by < 50% of C. dubliniensis yeast cells (Fig. 1). Sustained hypha formation up to 5 h required the combination of a temperature and pH shift in nutrient depleted medium (Fig. 1).


Candida albicans exhibits enhanced alkaline and temperature induction of Efg1-regulated transcripts relative to Candida dubliniensis.

Caplice N, Moran GP - Genom Data (2015)

Hypha formation by C. dubliniensis Wü284 in Lee's medium. Cells grown overnight in YPD broth at 30 °C were inoculated in 2 ml Lee's medium (1 × 106 cells) in the well of a 6-well tissue culture dish. The proportion of germ-tube forming cells was assessed hourly using an inverted microscope. Lee's medium was used at standard concentration or diluted to 10% (v/v) standard concentration to induce nutrient depletion.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664712&req=5

f0005: Hypha formation by C. dubliniensis Wü284 in Lee's medium. Cells grown overnight in YPD broth at 30 °C were inoculated in 2 ml Lee's medium (1 × 106 cells) in the well of a 6-well tissue culture dish. The proportion of germ-tube forming cells was assessed hourly using an inverted microscope. Lee's medium was used at standard concentration or diluted to 10% (v/v) standard concentration to induce nutrient depletion.
Mentions: In C. albicans, a shift to alkaline pH and 37 °C is sufficient to induce hypha formation in vitro in nutrient rich culture media [22]. Using Lee's medium as a defined basal medium, we independently examined the role of temperature, pH and nutrient depletion in true hypha formation in C. dubliniensis. Following a shift from Lee's medium pH 4.5 at 30 °C to Lee's medium pH 7.2 at 37 °C, less than 50% of C. dubliniensis cells had formed germ-tubes following 5 h incubation. In contrast, in nutrient depleted (10% v/v) Lee's pH 7.2 at 37 °C, > 95% of cells formed germ-tubes by 5 h. Shifts to 37 °C or pH 7.2 alone in nutrient depleted (10% v/v) Lee's resulted in transient germ-tube formation by < 50% of C. dubliniensis yeast cells (Fig. 1). Sustained hypha formation up to 5 h required the combination of a temperature and pH shift in nutrient depleted medium (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Filamentous growth is an important virulence trait of the human pathogenic fungi within the genus Candida, and the greater propensity of C. albicans to form hyphae has been proposed to account for the greater virulence of this species relative to the less pathogenic species C. dubliniensis.We could identify conserved core temperature and pH responses, however many signature Efg1-regulated, hypha-induced transcripts (e.g. ECE1, HWP1) exhibited reduced or lack of induction in C. dubliniensis.Comparison of the activity of the HWP1 and ECE1 promoters in both species using GFP fusions showed a lag in serum induced fluorescence in C. dubliniensis relative to C. albicans and nutrient depletion was required for maximal expression of these Efg1-regulated transcripts in C. dubliniensis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Microbiology Research Unit, Division of Oral Biosciences, Dublin Dental University Hospital, University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Filamentous growth is an important virulence trait of the human pathogenic fungi within the genus Candida, and the greater propensity of C. albicans to form hyphae has been proposed to account for the greater virulence of this species relative to the less pathogenic species C. dubliniensis. In this meta-analysis, we compare the transcriptional response of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans to the individual environmental stimuli that shape the gene expression profiles during filamentation in 10% serum, namely alkaline pH, 37 °C and reduced cell density. We could identify conserved core temperature and pH responses, however many signature Efg1-regulated, hypha-induced transcripts (e.g. ECE1, HWP1) exhibited reduced or lack of induction in C. dubliniensis. Comparison of the activity of the HWP1 and ECE1 promoters in both species using GFP fusions showed a lag in serum induced fluorescence in C. dubliniensis relative to C. albicans and nutrient depletion was required for maximal expression of these Efg1-regulated transcripts in C. dubliniensis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus