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Punctuation, Prosody, and Discourse: Afterthought Vs. Right Dislocation.

Kalbertodt J, Primus B, Schumacher PB - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Results show an effect of both punctuation and discourse context (mediated by syntax) on phrasing and accentuation.Interestingly, for pitch range reduction no difference between RDs and ATs could be observed.Our results corroborate a language architecture model in which punctuation, prosody, syntax, and discourse-semantics are independent but interacting domains with correspondence constraints between them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IfL Phonetik, University of Cologne Cologne, Germany ; Department of German Language and Literature I, University of Cologne Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In a reading production experiment we investigate the impact of punctuation and discourse structure on the prosodic differentiation of right dislocation (RD) and afterthought (AT). Both discourse structure and punctuation are likely to affect the prosodic marking of these right-peripheral constructions, as certain prosodic markings are appropriate only in certain discourse structures, and punctuation is said to correlate with prosodic phrasing. With RD and AT clearly differing in discourse function (comment-topic structuring vs. disambiguation) and punctuation (comma vs. full stop), critical items in this study were manipulated with regard to the (mis-)match of these parameters. Since RD and AT are said to prosodically differ in pitch range, phrasing, and accentuation patterns, we measured the reduction of pitch range, boundary strength and prominence level. Results show an effect of both punctuation and discourse context (mediated by syntax) on phrasing and accentuation. Interestingly, for pitch range reduction no difference between RDs and ATs could be observed. Our results corroborate a language architecture model in which punctuation, prosody, syntax, and discourse-semantics are independent but interacting domains with correspondence constraints between them. Our findings suggest there are tight correspondence constraints between (i) punctuation (full stop and comma in particular) and syntax, (ii) prosody and syntax as well as (iii) prosody and discourse-semantics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of punctuation mark on pitch range reduction (in st) in filler items. Negative values indicate a decrease of pitch range, positive values an increase of pitch range.
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Figure 4: Effect of punctuation mark on pitch range reduction (in st) in filler items. Negative values indicate a decrease of pitch range, positive values an increase of pitch range.

Mentions: In filler items, pitch range very slightly decreased from RootP1 to RootP2 in both comma condition (–0.37 st) and full stop condition (–0.2 st). In neither the comma condition nor the full stop condition was this decrease significant [comma condition: t(381, 22) = 1.74, p = 0.08; full stop condition: t(378, 78) = 0.87, p = 0.38]. As Figure 4 shows, there is nearly no difference between fillers marked with a comma and fillers marked with a full stop. This was supported by our linear mixed effects model where punctuation mark entered as factor and random intercepts were used for speaker and item. Our model did not reveal an effect of punctuation (χ2(1) = 0.522, p = 0.47).


Punctuation, Prosody, and Discourse: Afterthought Vs. Right Dislocation.

Kalbertodt J, Primus B, Schumacher PB - Front Psychol (2015)

Effect of punctuation mark on pitch range reduction (in st) in filler items. Negative values indicate a decrease of pitch range, positive values an increase of pitch range.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664648&req=5

Figure 4: Effect of punctuation mark on pitch range reduction (in st) in filler items. Negative values indicate a decrease of pitch range, positive values an increase of pitch range.
Mentions: In filler items, pitch range very slightly decreased from RootP1 to RootP2 in both comma condition (–0.37 st) and full stop condition (–0.2 st). In neither the comma condition nor the full stop condition was this decrease significant [comma condition: t(381, 22) = 1.74, p = 0.08; full stop condition: t(378, 78) = 0.87, p = 0.38]. As Figure 4 shows, there is nearly no difference between fillers marked with a comma and fillers marked with a full stop. This was supported by our linear mixed effects model where punctuation mark entered as factor and random intercepts were used for speaker and item. Our model did not reveal an effect of punctuation (χ2(1) = 0.522, p = 0.47).

Bottom Line: Results show an effect of both punctuation and discourse context (mediated by syntax) on phrasing and accentuation.Interestingly, for pitch range reduction no difference between RDs and ATs could be observed.Our results corroborate a language architecture model in which punctuation, prosody, syntax, and discourse-semantics are independent but interacting domains with correspondence constraints between them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IfL Phonetik, University of Cologne Cologne, Germany ; Department of German Language and Literature I, University of Cologne Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In a reading production experiment we investigate the impact of punctuation and discourse structure on the prosodic differentiation of right dislocation (RD) and afterthought (AT). Both discourse structure and punctuation are likely to affect the prosodic marking of these right-peripheral constructions, as certain prosodic markings are appropriate only in certain discourse structures, and punctuation is said to correlate with prosodic phrasing. With RD and AT clearly differing in discourse function (comment-topic structuring vs. disambiguation) and punctuation (comma vs. full stop), critical items in this study were manipulated with regard to the (mis-)match of these parameters. Since RD and AT are said to prosodically differ in pitch range, phrasing, and accentuation patterns, we measured the reduction of pitch range, boundary strength and prominence level. Results show an effect of both punctuation and discourse context (mediated by syntax) on phrasing and accentuation. Interestingly, for pitch range reduction no difference between RDs and ATs could be observed. Our results corroborate a language architecture model in which punctuation, prosody, syntax, and discourse-semantics are independent but interacting domains with correspondence constraints between them. Our findings suggest there are tight correspondence constraints between (i) punctuation (full stop and comma in particular) and syntax, (ii) prosody and syntax as well as (iii) prosody and discourse-semantics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus