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Perceptual Training in Beach Volleyball Defence: Different Effects of Gaze-Path Cueing on Gaze and Decision-Making.

Klostermann A, Vater C, Kredel R, Hossner EJ - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, recent findings challenge this method, especially, with regards to its actual effects on gaze behavior.Gaze analyses revealed learning effects for the dysfunctional group only.Hence, the results confirm cueing effects on gaze behavior, but they also question its benefit for enhancing decision-making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport Science, University of Bern Bern, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
For perceptual-cognitive skill training, a variety of intervention methods has been proposed, including the so-called "color-cueing method" which aims on superior gaze-path learning by applying visual markers. However, recent findings challenge this method, especially, with regards to its actual effects on gaze behavior. Consequently, after a preparatory study on the identification of appropriate visual cues for life-size displays, a perceptual-training experiment on decision-making in beach volleyball was conducted, contrasting two cueing interventions (functional vs. dysfunctional gaze path) with a conservative control condition (anticipation-related instructions). Gaze analyses revealed learning effects for the dysfunctional group only. Regarding decision-making, all groups showed enhanced performance with largest improvements for the control group followed by the functional and the dysfunctional group. Hence, the results confirm cueing effects on gaze behavior, but they also question its benefit for enhancing decision-making. However, before completely denying the method's value, optimisations should be checked regarding, for instance, cueing-pattern characteristics and gaze-related feedback.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Visual-cue markers (small/static, small/flashing, large/static, and large/flashing) in a selected frame of the video footage. Only the two players on the right side of the screen are shown, the player in the front is receiving the ball; original tapes were colored with red markers.
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Figure 1: Visual-cue markers (small/static, small/flashing, large/static, and large/flashing) in a selected frame of the video footage. Only the two players on the right side of the screen are shown, the player in the front is receiving the ball; original tapes were colored with red markers.

Mentions: In the preparatory study, decision-making and, especially, gaze behavior were tested as a function of different types of visual cues in a sports-related anticipation task. Furthermore, the aim was to check whether gaze behavior is also drawn by visual cues in life-sized displays as planned to be used in the main study. For this purpose, four groups of 10 sport science students (21 males and 19 females, age: M = 21.6 years, SD = 1.6 years) watched two times 12 taped (Sony HDR-XR520V, 25 Hz) volleyball-practice situations on a life-sized screen (height: 2.6 m, width: 3.4 m). In these scenes four players (two male and two female) forearm-passed a volleyball three times back and forth that were rectangularly positioned in a gymnastics hall. The participants’ task was to decide three times in each scene by pressing the button as fast and accurate as possible whether either the player in the front or the player in the back would receive the ball. For one of the three decisions in each scene, the receiving player’s hip was marked with a visual cue two frames after the ball had left the proceeding players’ forearms until ball reception. The visual cues between groups differed in sizes (small/1.4° visual angle/filled vs. large/2.8° visual angle/unfilled) and in playback frequencies (static vs. flashing with 5 Hz) (see Figure 1). The video scenes were processed using Matlab 2011b and were rendered with MAGIX Video Pro X3.


Perceptual Training in Beach Volleyball Defence: Different Effects of Gaze-Path Cueing on Gaze and Decision-Making.

Klostermann A, Vater C, Kredel R, Hossner EJ - Front Psychol (2015)

Visual-cue markers (small/static, small/flashing, large/static, and large/flashing) in a selected frame of the video footage. Only the two players on the right side of the screen are shown, the player in the front is receiving the ball; original tapes were colored with red markers.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664622&req=5

Figure 1: Visual-cue markers (small/static, small/flashing, large/static, and large/flashing) in a selected frame of the video footage. Only the two players on the right side of the screen are shown, the player in the front is receiving the ball; original tapes were colored with red markers.
Mentions: In the preparatory study, decision-making and, especially, gaze behavior were tested as a function of different types of visual cues in a sports-related anticipation task. Furthermore, the aim was to check whether gaze behavior is also drawn by visual cues in life-sized displays as planned to be used in the main study. For this purpose, four groups of 10 sport science students (21 males and 19 females, age: M = 21.6 years, SD = 1.6 years) watched two times 12 taped (Sony HDR-XR520V, 25 Hz) volleyball-practice situations on a life-sized screen (height: 2.6 m, width: 3.4 m). In these scenes four players (two male and two female) forearm-passed a volleyball three times back and forth that were rectangularly positioned in a gymnastics hall. The participants’ task was to decide three times in each scene by pressing the button as fast and accurate as possible whether either the player in the front or the player in the back would receive the ball. For one of the three decisions in each scene, the receiving player’s hip was marked with a visual cue two frames after the ball had left the proceeding players’ forearms until ball reception. The visual cues between groups differed in sizes (small/1.4° visual angle/filled vs. large/2.8° visual angle/unfilled) and in playback frequencies (static vs. flashing with 5 Hz) (see Figure 1). The video scenes were processed using Matlab 2011b and were rendered with MAGIX Video Pro X3.

Bottom Line: However, recent findings challenge this method, especially, with regards to its actual effects on gaze behavior.Gaze analyses revealed learning effects for the dysfunctional group only.Hence, the results confirm cueing effects on gaze behavior, but they also question its benefit for enhancing decision-making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Sport Science, University of Bern Bern, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
For perceptual-cognitive skill training, a variety of intervention methods has been proposed, including the so-called "color-cueing method" which aims on superior gaze-path learning by applying visual markers. However, recent findings challenge this method, especially, with regards to its actual effects on gaze behavior. Consequently, after a preparatory study on the identification of appropriate visual cues for life-size displays, a perceptual-training experiment on decision-making in beach volleyball was conducted, contrasting two cueing interventions (functional vs. dysfunctional gaze path) with a conservative control condition (anticipation-related instructions). Gaze analyses revealed learning effects for the dysfunctional group only. Regarding decision-making, all groups showed enhanced performance with largest improvements for the control group followed by the functional and the dysfunctional group. Hence, the results confirm cueing effects on gaze behavior, but they also question its benefit for enhancing decision-making. However, before completely denying the method's value, optimisations should be checked regarding, for instance, cueing-pattern characteristics and gaze-related feedback.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus