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Burdensome problems of chronic musculoskeletal pain and future prospects.

Ushida T - J Orthop Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: However, these drugs are commonly associated with problems such as adverse effects, drug dependency and drug abuse, and they must be used with care.Besides, exercise therapy has been found to be effective in treating many different types of chronic pain.The therapeutic strategy is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, and patients are taught about methods for restoring physical function and coping with pain, mostly with drugs and exercise therapy, so that any pain present does not impair function and the patient can reintegrate into society.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Japan. ushidat-koc@umin.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
According to a recent survey, about 15 % of the Japanese population suffers from moderate-severe chronic musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months. Social factors and related psychological factors (including depression) thus appear to greatly affect chronic musculoskeletal pain. This suggests the need for measures that take these factors into account. Treatment for musculoskeletal pain at present is generally based on a biomedical model that has been used for many years in this field, and modern medical imaging technologies have been a high priority to support this model and treatment strategy. Under the concept of the biomedical model, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, channel blockers and opioid analgesics are generally used as pharmacotherapy to alleviate chronic pain. However, these drugs are commonly associated with problems such as adverse effects, drug dependency and drug abuse, and they must be used with care. Surgery may also be effective in treating certain diseases, but studies have shown that many patients suffer residual chronic pain even after such treatment. Besides, exercise therapy has been found to be effective in treating many different types of chronic pain. Lately, various countries have been launching interdisciplinary pain centers that use a multidisciplinary approach to treat chronic musculoskeletal pain. Treatment in these centers is provided by a team of specialists in anesthesiology, psychiatry and orthopedics as well as the relevant paramedical professionals. The therapeutic strategy is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, and patients are taught about methods for restoring physical function and coping with pain, mostly with drugs and exercise therapy, so that any pain present does not impair function and the patient can reintegrate into society.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of musculoskeletal chronic pain in Japan; 15.4 % of the population experienced musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months (a). The prevalence of such pain is high among those in their 30s–50s (an age group comprising the key productive years; b). (From Nakamura M. et al. J Orthop Sci 2011;16:424–32)
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Fig2: Prevalence of musculoskeletal chronic pain in Japan; 15.4 % of the population experienced musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months (a). The prevalence of such pain is high among those in their 30s–50s (an age group comprising the key productive years; b). (From Nakamura M. et al. J Orthop Sci 2011;16:424–32)

Mentions: Nakamura et al. administered questionnaires to about 10,000 people in Japan [2] and reported that 15.4 % of the population experienced musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months (Fig. 2a), that the prevalence of such pain is high among those in their 30s–50s (an age group comprising the key productive years; Fig. 2b), that the prevalence of chronic pain is higher in large urban areas than in rural districts (Fig. 3) and that the frequency of chronic pain affecting the lower back, shoulders, neck and knees is high. Other findings from that survey were that the prevalence of pain was higher among office workers and professionals than among those working in primary industries such as forestry or fishery cooperatives, that there were similar numbers of individuals visiting hospitals and clinics as those visiting folk remedy (acupuncture, massage, etc.) medical services for musculoskeletal pain treatment (about 20 % for each), that a large majority of individuals in pain were not receiving treatment at a clinic or hospital, and that about half of patients switched hospitals/clinics during treatment.Fig. 2


Burdensome problems of chronic musculoskeletal pain and future prospects.

Ushida T - J Orthop Sci (2015)

Prevalence of musculoskeletal chronic pain in Japan; 15.4 % of the population experienced musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months (a). The prevalence of such pain is high among those in their 30s–50s (an age group comprising the key productive years; b). (From Nakamura M. et al. J Orthop Sci 2011;16:424–32)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664610&req=5

Fig2: Prevalence of musculoskeletal chronic pain in Japan; 15.4 % of the population experienced musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months (a). The prevalence of such pain is high among those in their 30s–50s (an age group comprising the key productive years; b). (From Nakamura M. et al. J Orthop Sci 2011;16:424–32)
Mentions: Nakamura et al. administered questionnaires to about 10,000 people in Japan [2] and reported that 15.4 % of the population experienced musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months (Fig. 2a), that the prevalence of such pain is high among those in their 30s–50s (an age group comprising the key productive years; Fig. 2b), that the prevalence of chronic pain is higher in large urban areas than in rural districts (Fig. 3) and that the frequency of chronic pain affecting the lower back, shoulders, neck and knees is high. Other findings from that survey were that the prevalence of pain was higher among office workers and professionals than among those working in primary industries such as forestry or fishery cooperatives, that there were similar numbers of individuals visiting hospitals and clinics as those visiting folk remedy (acupuncture, massage, etc.) medical services for musculoskeletal pain treatment (about 20 % for each), that a large majority of individuals in pain were not receiving treatment at a clinic or hospital, and that about half of patients switched hospitals/clinics during treatment.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: However, these drugs are commonly associated with problems such as adverse effects, drug dependency and drug abuse, and they must be used with care.Besides, exercise therapy has been found to be effective in treating many different types of chronic pain.The therapeutic strategy is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, and patients are taught about methods for restoring physical function and coping with pain, mostly with drugs and exercise therapy, so that any pain present does not impair function and the patient can reintegrate into society.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Japan. ushidat-koc@umin.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
According to a recent survey, about 15 % of the Japanese population suffers from moderate-severe chronic musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months. Social factors and related psychological factors (including depression) thus appear to greatly affect chronic musculoskeletal pain. This suggests the need for measures that take these factors into account. Treatment for musculoskeletal pain at present is generally based on a biomedical model that has been used for many years in this field, and modern medical imaging technologies have been a high priority to support this model and treatment strategy. Under the concept of the biomedical model, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, channel blockers and opioid analgesics are generally used as pharmacotherapy to alleviate chronic pain. However, these drugs are commonly associated with problems such as adverse effects, drug dependency and drug abuse, and they must be used with care. Surgery may also be effective in treating certain diseases, but studies have shown that many patients suffer residual chronic pain even after such treatment. Besides, exercise therapy has been found to be effective in treating many different types of chronic pain. Lately, various countries have been launching interdisciplinary pain centers that use a multidisciplinary approach to treat chronic musculoskeletal pain. Treatment in these centers is provided by a team of specialists in anesthesiology, psychiatry and orthopedics as well as the relevant paramedical professionals. The therapeutic strategy is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, and patients are taught about methods for restoring physical function and coping with pain, mostly with drugs and exercise therapy, so that any pain present does not impair function and the patient can reintegrate into society.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus