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The impact of social support on the risk of eating disorders in women exposed to intimate partner violence.

Schirk DK, Lehman EB, Perry AN, Ornstein RM, McCall-Hosenfeld JS - Int J Womens Health (2015)

Bottom Line: High risk of an ED was significantly associated with risky alcohol use (18%) versus non-risky alcohol use (13%; P=0.008).In multivariable analysis, a 5-unit increase in overall SS was significantly associated with decreased odds of ED risk (P=0.007).SS may protect against ED by reducing anxiety and promoting positive actions, but further study is needed to confirm this.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Eating disorders (EDs) are often found among women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). The role of social support (SS) as a protective factor against ED among IPV-exposed women is not firmly established.

Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of risk of EDs among women exposed to IPV and to examine the impact of SS on risk of ED among IPV-exposed women.

Methods: Women (aged 18-64 years) exposed to IPV during their lifetimes (defined by the Humiliation-Afraid-Rape-Kick instrument) were recruited from primary care and domestic violence service agencies and surveyed on demographics, mood/anxiety disorders, psychosocial/community factors, and strategies used in response to IPV. The Eating Disorder Screen for Primary Care assessed the risk of ED. A modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey assessed overall functional support (scale range: 0-32; categorized into quartiles). Ordinal logistic regression examined the risk of ED based on SS, controlling for prespecified demographics (age, race/ethnicity, marital status, near-poverty level), and health-related factors significant in bivariate analyses (risky alcohol use).

Results: Among 302 women with lifetime IPV, 41 (14%) were at high risk, 127 (42%) were at moderate risk, and 134 (44%) were at low risk of an ED. In bivariate analyses, high risk of an ED was significantly more frequent among women with a low SS score (<19, 24%) versus a high SS score (≥30, 12%) (P=0.03). High risk of an ED was significantly associated with risky alcohol use (18%) versus non-risky alcohol use (13%; P=0.008). In multivariable analysis, a 5-unit increase in overall SS was significantly associated with decreased odds of ED risk (P=0.007).

Conclusion: Among IPV-exposed women, low SS is associated with an increased risk of ED. SS may protect against ED by reducing anxiety and promoting positive actions, but further study is needed to confirm this.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Recruitment of subjects.Abbreviations: PSARN, Penn State Ambulatory Research Network; IPV, intimate partner violence.
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f1-ijwh-7-919: Recruitment of subjects.Abbreviations: PSARN, Penn State Ambulatory Research Network; IPV, intimate partner violence.

Mentions: All participants were women between the ages of 18 and 64 years. The two methods of recruitment are shown in Figure 1. All women, aged 18–64 years, who had an outpatient visit between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2012, at a site served by the Penn State Ambulatory Research Network – a primary care network serving a diverse region of central Pennsylvania – were initially eligible. These 24,338 women were stratified by rurality of residence so that rural-residing women could be oversampled to provide adequate geographic variation in the study sample. A random sample of 2,500 women was then selected from this population. These 2,500 women were sent a brief screening survey that asked questions about health conditions, demographics, health behaviors, habits such as substance use, and IPV exposure as measured by the Humiliation–Afraid–Rape– Kick (HARK) screener. HARK is a four-question screening instrument for IPV that has been validated in primary care settings, and accurately identifies women experiencing IPV; it encompasses emotional, sexual, and physical abuse.16 The HARK questions are as follows:


The impact of social support on the risk of eating disorders in women exposed to intimate partner violence.

Schirk DK, Lehman EB, Perry AN, Ornstein RM, McCall-Hosenfeld JS - Int J Womens Health (2015)

Recruitment of subjects.Abbreviations: PSARN, Penn State Ambulatory Research Network; IPV, intimate partner violence.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664489&req=5

f1-ijwh-7-919: Recruitment of subjects.Abbreviations: PSARN, Penn State Ambulatory Research Network; IPV, intimate partner violence.
Mentions: All participants were women between the ages of 18 and 64 years. The two methods of recruitment are shown in Figure 1. All women, aged 18–64 years, who had an outpatient visit between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2012, at a site served by the Penn State Ambulatory Research Network – a primary care network serving a diverse region of central Pennsylvania – were initially eligible. These 24,338 women were stratified by rurality of residence so that rural-residing women could be oversampled to provide adequate geographic variation in the study sample. A random sample of 2,500 women was then selected from this population. These 2,500 women were sent a brief screening survey that asked questions about health conditions, demographics, health behaviors, habits such as substance use, and IPV exposure as measured by the Humiliation–Afraid–Rape– Kick (HARK) screener. HARK is a four-question screening instrument for IPV that has been validated in primary care settings, and accurately identifies women experiencing IPV; it encompasses emotional, sexual, and physical abuse.16 The HARK questions are as follows:

Bottom Line: High risk of an ED was significantly associated with risky alcohol use (18%) versus non-risky alcohol use (13%; P=0.008).In multivariable analysis, a 5-unit increase in overall SS was significantly associated with decreased odds of ED risk (P=0.007).SS may protect against ED by reducing anxiety and promoting positive actions, but further study is needed to confirm this.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Eating disorders (EDs) are often found among women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). The role of social support (SS) as a protective factor against ED among IPV-exposed women is not firmly established.

Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of risk of EDs among women exposed to IPV and to examine the impact of SS on risk of ED among IPV-exposed women.

Methods: Women (aged 18-64 years) exposed to IPV during their lifetimes (defined by the Humiliation-Afraid-Rape-Kick instrument) were recruited from primary care and domestic violence service agencies and surveyed on demographics, mood/anxiety disorders, psychosocial/community factors, and strategies used in response to IPV. The Eating Disorder Screen for Primary Care assessed the risk of ED. A modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey assessed overall functional support (scale range: 0-32; categorized into quartiles). Ordinal logistic regression examined the risk of ED based on SS, controlling for prespecified demographics (age, race/ethnicity, marital status, near-poverty level), and health-related factors significant in bivariate analyses (risky alcohol use).

Results: Among 302 women with lifetime IPV, 41 (14%) were at high risk, 127 (42%) were at moderate risk, and 134 (44%) were at low risk of an ED. In bivariate analyses, high risk of an ED was significantly more frequent among women with a low SS score (<19, 24%) versus a high SS score (≥30, 12%) (P=0.03). High risk of an ED was significantly associated with risky alcohol use (18%) versus non-risky alcohol use (13%; P=0.008). In multivariable analysis, a 5-unit increase in overall SS was significantly associated with decreased odds of ED risk (P=0.007).

Conclusion: Among IPV-exposed women, low SS is associated with an increased risk of ED. SS may protect against ED by reducing anxiety and promoting positive actions, but further study is needed to confirm this.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus