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Adoptive transfer of immune subsets prior to MCAO does not exacerbate stroke outcome in splenectomized mice.

Wang J, Dotson AL, Murphy SJ, Offner H, Saugstad JA - J Syst Integr Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: The results demonstrate that CD4/CD8/CD11b treated mice had no significant effect on infarct volumes vs. vehicle-treated control mice after MCAO.However, there were significant alterations to the resident peripheral immune composition.These results suggest that there are regulatory factors resulting from splenectomy or other possible influences that inhibit peripheral immune cell contribution to neuroinflammation and thus contributing to differential effects of the spleen on stroke outcome in males and female mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

ABSTRACT

The peripheral immune response contributes to neurologic impairment after stroke and the extent of initial damage is greater in males than females. We have previously shown that spleen cells directly contribute to ischemic damage in males, as splenectomy prior to experimental stroke eliminates the sex differences in infarct volume. This study aims to determine which specific subset of immune cells exert pathogenic effects when injected 24 hours before MCAO induction into splenectomized male and female WT mice. The results demonstrate that CD4/CD8/CD11b treated mice had no significant effect on infarct volumes vs. vehicle-treated control mice after MCAO. However, there were significant alterations to the resident peripheral immune composition. These results suggest that there are regulatory factors resulting from splenectomy or other possible influences that inhibit peripheral immune cell contribution to neuroinflammation and thus contributing to differential effects of the spleen on stroke outcome in males and female mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adoptive transfer of activated CD11b+ monocytes, 24 h before MCAO, does not increase infarct volume in splenectomized male and female WT miceMale and female mice were subject to splenectomy two weeks prior to transient MCAO (60 min). Mice were injected with CD11b+ 24 hours prior to MCAO. Brains were harvested 96 h after MCAO. (A) Infarct volumes measured as percentage of corrected contralateral structure for male mice (n=3) and female mice (n=3) injected with saline vehicle, or male mice (n=5) and female mice (n=5) injected with 5 million CD11b+ cells. Values represent mean numbers (± SEM) of splenectomized mice per group analyzed using a one-way ANOVA.
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Figure 5: Adoptive transfer of activated CD11b+ monocytes, 24 h before MCAO, does not increase infarct volume in splenectomized male and female WT miceMale and female mice were subject to splenectomy two weeks prior to transient MCAO (60 min). Mice were injected with CD11b+ 24 hours prior to MCAO. Brains were harvested 96 h after MCAO. (A) Infarct volumes measured as percentage of corrected contralateral structure for male mice (n=3) and female mice (n=3) injected with saline vehicle, or male mice (n=5) and female mice (n=5) injected with 5 million CD11b+ cells. Values represent mean numbers (± SEM) of splenectomized mice per group analyzed using a one-way ANOVA.

Mentions: We then examined the effect of adoptive transfer of activated CD11b+ monocytes on infarct volume in splenectomized male and female mice. Mice were injected with 5 million activated CD11b+ cells 24 hours prior to MCAO, and brains were harvested 96 h after MCAO. Figure 5 shows infarct volumes measured as percentage of corrected contralateral structure for male mice (n = 3) and female mice (n = 3) injected with saline vehicle, or male mice (n = 7) and female mice (n = 5) injected with 5 million activated CD11b+ cells. Values represent mean numbers (± SEM) of splenectomized mice per group analyzed using a one-way ANOVA.


Adoptive transfer of immune subsets prior to MCAO does not exacerbate stroke outcome in splenectomized mice.

Wang J, Dotson AL, Murphy SJ, Offner H, Saugstad JA - J Syst Integr Neurosci (2015)

Adoptive transfer of activated CD11b+ monocytes, 24 h before MCAO, does not increase infarct volume in splenectomized male and female WT miceMale and female mice were subject to splenectomy two weeks prior to transient MCAO (60 min). Mice were injected with CD11b+ 24 hours prior to MCAO. Brains were harvested 96 h after MCAO. (A) Infarct volumes measured as percentage of corrected contralateral structure for male mice (n=3) and female mice (n=3) injected with saline vehicle, or male mice (n=5) and female mice (n=5) injected with 5 million CD11b+ cells. Values represent mean numbers (± SEM) of splenectomized mice per group analyzed using a one-way ANOVA.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664464&req=5

Figure 5: Adoptive transfer of activated CD11b+ monocytes, 24 h before MCAO, does not increase infarct volume in splenectomized male and female WT miceMale and female mice were subject to splenectomy two weeks prior to transient MCAO (60 min). Mice were injected with CD11b+ 24 hours prior to MCAO. Brains were harvested 96 h after MCAO. (A) Infarct volumes measured as percentage of corrected contralateral structure for male mice (n=3) and female mice (n=3) injected with saline vehicle, or male mice (n=5) and female mice (n=5) injected with 5 million CD11b+ cells. Values represent mean numbers (± SEM) of splenectomized mice per group analyzed using a one-way ANOVA.
Mentions: We then examined the effect of adoptive transfer of activated CD11b+ monocytes on infarct volume in splenectomized male and female mice. Mice were injected with 5 million activated CD11b+ cells 24 hours prior to MCAO, and brains were harvested 96 h after MCAO. Figure 5 shows infarct volumes measured as percentage of corrected contralateral structure for male mice (n = 3) and female mice (n = 3) injected with saline vehicle, or male mice (n = 7) and female mice (n = 5) injected with 5 million activated CD11b+ cells. Values represent mean numbers (± SEM) of splenectomized mice per group analyzed using a one-way ANOVA.

Bottom Line: The results demonstrate that CD4/CD8/CD11b treated mice had no significant effect on infarct volumes vs. vehicle-treated control mice after MCAO.However, there were significant alterations to the resident peripheral immune composition.These results suggest that there are regulatory factors resulting from splenectomy or other possible influences that inhibit peripheral immune cell contribution to neuroinflammation and thus contributing to differential effects of the spleen on stroke outcome in males and female mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

ABSTRACT

The peripheral immune response contributes to neurologic impairment after stroke and the extent of initial damage is greater in males than females. We have previously shown that spleen cells directly contribute to ischemic damage in males, as splenectomy prior to experimental stroke eliminates the sex differences in infarct volume. This study aims to determine which specific subset of immune cells exert pathogenic effects when injected 24 hours before MCAO induction into splenectomized male and female WT mice. The results demonstrate that CD4/CD8/CD11b treated mice had no significant effect on infarct volumes vs. vehicle-treated control mice after MCAO. However, there were significant alterations to the resident peripheral immune composition. These results suggest that there are regulatory factors resulting from splenectomy or other possible influences that inhibit peripheral immune cell contribution to neuroinflammation and thus contributing to differential effects of the spleen on stroke outcome in males and female mice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus