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Competition and Cooperation among Relational Memory Representations.

Schwarb H, Watson PD, Campbell K, Shander CL, Monti JM, Cooke GE, Wang JX, Kramer AF, Cohen NJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this task, participants learned unique face-room associations in two distinct contexts (i.e., different colored buildings).Overall, performance was very accurate.This novel task provides a powerful tool for investigating both the unique and interacting contributions of these systems in support of relational memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Illinois, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Urbana, IL, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Mnemonic processing engages multiple systems that cooperate and compete to support task performance. Exploring these systems' interaction requires memory tasks that produce rich data with multiple patterns of performance sensitive to different processing sub-components. Here we present a novel context-dependent relational memory paradigm designed to engage multiple learning and memory systems. In this task, participants learned unique face-room associations in two distinct contexts (i.e., different colored buildings). Faces occupied rooms as determined by an implicit gender-by-side rule structure (e.g., male faces on the left and female faces on the right) and all faces were seen in both contexts. In two experiments, we use behavioral and eye-tracking measures to investigate interactions among different memory representations in both younger and older adult populations; furthermore we link these representations to volumetric variations in hippocampus and ventromedial PFC among older adults. Overall, performance was very accurate. Successful face placement into a studied room systematically varied with hippocampal volume. Selecting the studied room in the wrong context was the most typical error. The proportion of these errors to correct responses positively correlated with ventromedial prefrontal volume. This novel task provides a powerful tool for investigating both the unique and interacting contributions of these systems in support of relational memory.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Behavioral performance.Proportion of face placement to rooms on the correct (green) and incorrect (blue) side of the building. Dark bars indicate face placements to the studied room on a given side whereas colored (green or blue) bars indicate face placements to any of the remaining eight unstudied rooms. Data are presented for both the Study1x and Study3x groups and standard error bars are shown.
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pone.0143832.g003: Behavioral performance.Proportion of face placement to rooms on the correct (green) and incorrect (blue) side of the building. Dark bars indicate face placements to the studied room on a given side whereas colored (green or blue) bars indicate face placements to any of the remaining eight unstudied rooms. Data are presented for both the Study1x and Study3x groups and standard error bars are shown.

Mentions: Furthermore, participants in the Study1x group made 33.8% of their total placements to the CC-studied room and 4.6% to the CI-studied room; this difference was significant t(19) = 9.45, p < .001 (Fig 3). Participants in the Study3x group made 46.1% of their total placements to the CC-studied room and 10.7% to the CI-studied room; this difference was also significant t(19) = 5.87, p < .001 (Fig 3). These data show that participants in both groups are more likely to choose the CC-studied room compared to the CI-studied room. However, independent samples t-tests indicated that people in the Study3x group made both more CC-studied responses, t(38) = -2.08, p = .045, and more CI-studied responses, t(38) = -4.03, p < .001, than participants in the Study1x group indicating that with additional study opportunities, participants make more CC-studied and CI-studied room placements.


Competition and Cooperation among Relational Memory Representations.

Schwarb H, Watson PD, Campbell K, Shander CL, Monti JM, Cooke GE, Wang JX, Kramer AF, Cohen NJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Behavioral performance.Proportion of face placement to rooms on the correct (green) and incorrect (blue) side of the building. Dark bars indicate face placements to the studied room on a given side whereas colored (green or blue) bars indicate face placements to any of the remaining eight unstudied rooms. Data are presented for both the Study1x and Study3x groups and standard error bars are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664414&req=5

pone.0143832.g003: Behavioral performance.Proportion of face placement to rooms on the correct (green) and incorrect (blue) side of the building. Dark bars indicate face placements to the studied room on a given side whereas colored (green or blue) bars indicate face placements to any of the remaining eight unstudied rooms. Data are presented for both the Study1x and Study3x groups and standard error bars are shown.
Mentions: Furthermore, participants in the Study1x group made 33.8% of their total placements to the CC-studied room and 4.6% to the CI-studied room; this difference was significant t(19) = 9.45, p < .001 (Fig 3). Participants in the Study3x group made 46.1% of their total placements to the CC-studied room and 10.7% to the CI-studied room; this difference was also significant t(19) = 5.87, p < .001 (Fig 3). These data show that participants in both groups are more likely to choose the CC-studied room compared to the CI-studied room. However, independent samples t-tests indicated that people in the Study3x group made both more CC-studied responses, t(38) = -2.08, p = .045, and more CI-studied responses, t(38) = -4.03, p < .001, than participants in the Study1x group indicating that with additional study opportunities, participants make more CC-studied and CI-studied room placements.

Bottom Line: In this task, participants learned unique face-room associations in two distinct contexts (i.e., different colored buildings).Overall, performance was very accurate.This novel task provides a powerful tool for investigating both the unique and interacting contributions of these systems in support of relational memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Illinois, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Urbana, IL, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Mnemonic processing engages multiple systems that cooperate and compete to support task performance. Exploring these systems' interaction requires memory tasks that produce rich data with multiple patterns of performance sensitive to different processing sub-components. Here we present a novel context-dependent relational memory paradigm designed to engage multiple learning and memory systems. In this task, participants learned unique face-room associations in two distinct contexts (i.e., different colored buildings). Faces occupied rooms as determined by an implicit gender-by-side rule structure (e.g., male faces on the left and female faces on the right) and all faces were seen in both contexts. In two experiments, we use behavioral and eye-tracking measures to investigate interactions among different memory representations in both younger and older adult populations; furthermore we link these representations to volumetric variations in hippocampus and ventromedial PFC among older adults. Overall, performance was very accurate. Successful face placement into a studied room systematically varied with hippocampal volume. Selecting the studied room in the wrong context was the most typical error. The proportion of these errors to correct responses positively correlated with ventromedial prefrontal volume. This novel task provides a powerful tool for investigating both the unique and interacting contributions of these systems in support of relational memory.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus