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3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

Chang CH, Lin CY, Liu FH, Chen MH, Lin CP, Ho HN, Liao YS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold.The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%.The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

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Schematics for the laser-aided gelling process.(1) a CO2 laser, (2) a laser scanner, (3) a working platform, (4) a scraper and (5) a feeder.
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pone.0143713.g001: Schematics for the laser-aided gelling process.(1) a CO2 laser, (2) a laser scanner, (3) a working platform, (4) a scraper and (5) a feeder.

Mentions: A home-made 3D printing machine was used, consisting of the following devices: (1) a CO2 laser, (2) a laser scanner, (3) a working platform, (4) a scraper, and (5) a feeder, as shown in Fig 1. The method used laser-aided gelling (LAG), as shown in Fig 1. The manufacturing process includes the following steps: (a) driving the servo motor to keep the feeding area at a fixed distance; (b) evenly paving the slurry in the feeding area on the surface of the working platform using a scraping plate and then returning the scraping plate to its original position after evenly paving the slurry in the forming area; (c) using the CO2 laser as the thermal energy source, scanning the shape for molding with the laser scanner until the moisture of the slurry evaporates and the shape sets; (d) steps (a) through (c) are repeated until the green part is finished. The slurry is removed by flushing with distilled water. This completes the production of the 3D green part. The curing reaction is irreversible, so the area that is not scanned in the slurry state is easily cleaned away by flushing with distilled water.


3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

Chang CH, Lin CY, Liu FH, Chen MH, Lin CP, Ho HN, Liao YS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Schematics for the laser-aided gelling process.(1) a CO2 laser, (2) a laser scanner, (3) a working platform, (4) a scraper and (5) a feeder.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664392&req=5

pone.0143713.g001: Schematics for the laser-aided gelling process.(1) a CO2 laser, (2) a laser scanner, (3) a working platform, (4) a scraper and (5) a feeder.
Mentions: A home-made 3D printing machine was used, consisting of the following devices: (1) a CO2 laser, (2) a laser scanner, (3) a working platform, (4) a scraper, and (5) a feeder, as shown in Fig 1. The method used laser-aided gelling (LAG), as shown in Fig 1. The manufacturing process includes the following steps: (a) driving the servo motor to keep the feeding area at a fixed distance; (b) evenly paving the slurry in the feeding area on the surface of the working platform using a scraping plate and then returning the scraping plate to its original position after evenly paving the slurry in the forming area; (c) using the CO2 laser as the thermal energy source, scanning the shape for molding with the laser scanner until the moisture of the slurry evaporates and the shape sets; (d) steps (a) through (c) are repeated until the green part is finished. The slurry is removed by flushing with distilled water. This completes the production of the 3D green part. The curing reaction is irreversible, so the area that is not scanned in the slurry state is easily cleaned away by flushing with distilled water.

Bottom Line: Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold.The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%.The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

Show MeSH