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Relative Pigment Composition and Remote Sensing Reflectance of Caribbean Shallow-Water Corals.

Torres-Pérez JL, Guild LS, Armstrong RA, Corredor J, Zuluaga-Montero A, Polanco R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments.Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified.Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5-98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bay Area Environmental Research Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-4, Bldg 245, Rm. 120, Moffett Field, CA, 94035, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Reef corals typically contain a number of pigments, mostly due to their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic dinoflagellates. These pigments usually vary in presence and concentration and influence the spectral characteristics of corals. We studied the variations in pigment composition among seven Caribbean shallow-water Scleractinian corals by means of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis to further resolve the discrimination of corals. We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments. Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified. A Principal Components Analysis and a Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed the separation of coral species based on pigment composition. All the corals were collected under the same physical environmental conditions. This suggests that pigment in the coral's symbionts might be more genetically-determined than influenced by prevailing physical conditions of the reef. We further investigated the use of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) as a tool for estimating the total pigment concentration of reef corals. Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5-98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between the area under the reflectance curve and total symbiont pigment concentration.The x-axis represents the integration of the reflectance curve from 400–700 nm. The lower right graph shows the pooled data from all seven species.
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pone.0143709.g006: Relationship between the area under the reflectance curve and total symbiont pigment concentration.The x-axis represents the integration of the reflectance curve from 400–700 nm. The lower right graph shows the pooled data from all seven species.

Mentions: Hochberg et al [5] grouped all the corals measured from the Pacific and the Caribbean into two basic shapes of spectral reflectance, “brown” and “blue” modes and postulated that “brown” mode reflectances are more determined by the symbiont’s pigment absorption whereas “blue” mode reflectances are more influenced by the expression of non-fluorescent coral-host pigment. Among the species exhibiting “brown” modes were: Montastraea (Orbicella) annularis, Diploria (Pseudodiploria) strigosa, Porites astreoides, and Siderastrea siderea, although the latter also exhibited “blue” modes. Based on our results, the spectra of Siderastrea siderea shown in Fig 6 accommodates to the “blue” mode described by [5] for this species. Host pigmentation can also generate spectral variations in the visible wavelengths [53], for example green fluorescent proteins (GFP) and other GFP-like pigments absorb and fluoresce in shorter and longer wavelengths, respectively, potentially contributing to the reflectance spectra of corals [54]. The contribution of fluorescent pigments to the apparent reflectance in corals is a factor which may be significant but has so far only been partially addressed [55–56]. The function of pigments within the coral tissue (i.e., GFP, GFP-like, pocilloporins, and others) is still under debate with photoprotective, energy transfer and chemical defense roles being proposed [13,49,57–61].


Relative Pigment Composition and Remote Sensing Reflectance of Caribbean Shallow-Water Corals.

Torres-Pérez JL, Guild LS, Armstrong RA, Corredor J, Zuluaga-Montero A, Polanco R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationship between the area under the reflectance curve and total symbiont pigment concentration.The x-axis represents the integration of the reflectance curve from 400–700 nm. The lower right graph shows the pooled data from all seven species.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664284&req=5

pone.0143709.g006: Relationship between the area under the reflectance curve and total symbiont pigment concentration.The x-axis represents the integration of the reflectance curve from 400–700 nm. The lower right graph shows the pooled data from all seven species.
Mentions: Hochberg et al [5] grouped all the corals measured from the Pacific and the Caribbean into two basic shapes of spectral reflectance, “brown” and “blue” modes and postulated that “brown” mode reflectances are more determined by the symbiont’s pigment absorption whereas “blue” mode reflectances are more influenced by the expression of non-fluorescent coral-host pigment. Among the species exhibiting “brown” modes were: Montastraea (Orbicella) annularis, Diploria (Pseudodiploria) strigosa, Porites astreoides, and Siderastrea siderea, although the latter also exhibited “blue” modes. Based on our results, the spectra of Siderastrea siderea shown in Fig 6 accommodates to the “blue” mode described by [5] for this species. Host pigmentation can also generate spectral variations in the visible wavelengths [53], for example green fluorescent proteins (GFP) and other GFP-like pigments absorb and fluoresce in shorter and longer wavelengths, respectively, potentially contributing to the reflectance spectra of corals [54]. The contribution of fluorescent pigments to the apparent reflectance in corals is a factor which may be significant but has so far only been partially addressed [55–56]. The function of pigments within the coral tissue (i.e., GFP, GFP-like, pocilloporins, and others) is still under debate with photoprotective, energy transfer and chemical defense roles being proposed [13,49,57–61].

Bottom Line: We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments.Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified.Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5-98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bay Area Environmental Research Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-4, Bldg 245, Rm. 120, Moffett Field, CA, 94035, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Reef corals typically contain a number of pigments, mostly due to their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic dinoflagellates. These pigments usually vary in presence and concentration and influence the spectral characteristics of corals. We studied the variations in pigment composition among seven Caribbean shallow-water Scleractinian corals by means of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis to further resolve the discrimination of corals. We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments. Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified. A Principal Components Analysis and a Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed the separation of coral species based on pigment composition. All the corals were collected under the same physical environmental conditions. This suggests that pigment in the coral's symbionts might be more genetically-determined than influenced by prevailing physical conditions of the reef. We further investigated the use of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) as a tool for estimating the total pigment concentration of reef corals. Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5-98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus