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Achieving Harmony among Different Social Identities within the Self-Concept: The Consequences of Internalising a Group-Based Philosophy of Life.

Turner-Zwinkels FM, Postmes T, van Zomeren M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life.Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life).We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
It can be hard for individuals to manage multiple group identities within their self-concept (e.g., being a Christian and a woman). We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life). In three studies we investigated the inter-identity fit between individuals' (highly holistic) religious identity and (less holistic) gender identity. Results provided converging support for our hypothesis across diverging methods (explicit questionnaires, more implicit associations, and a novel network analysis of group traits). We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

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Log transformed reaction times representing the interaction between match-type and self-defining Christianity (centred).
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pone.0137879.g002: Log transformed reaction times representing the interaction between match-type and self-defining Christianity (centred).

Mentions: Results show a main effect of Match-Type. Crucially, this was qualified by the predicted interaction between Match-Type and self-defining religion (see Fig 2). The increase in model fit is highly significant (χ2difference = 41.66, p < .001), which indicates significant differences between slopes. Moreover, the direction of the interaction confirms predictions. In line with expectations, the Self-Identities Match slope is steepest and significantly negative (B = -0.029, SE = 0.005, t (8781) = 5.89, p < .0001). So, the more religion is self-defining for an individual, the quicker they responded to traits that overlap across all three identities. Notably, the Self—Religious Identity Match slope was also significantly quicker (B = -0.024, SE = 0.008, t (8781) = 3.00, p < .05). However, no significant effect of Self—Gender Identity Match was found.


Achieving Harmony among Different Social Identities within the Self-Concept: The Consequences of Internalising a Group-Based Philosophy of Life.

Turner-Zwinkels FM, Postmes T, van Zomeren M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Log transformed reaction times representing the interaction between match-type and self-defining Christianity (centred).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664279&req=5

pone.0137879.g002: Log transformed reaction times representing the interaction between match-type and self-defining Christianity (centred).
Mentions: Results show a main effect of Match-Type. Crucially, this was qualified by the predicted interaction between Match-Type and self-defining religion (see Fig 2). The increase in model fit is highly significant (χ2difference = 41.66, p < .001), which indicates significant differences between slopes. Moreover, the direction of the interaction confirms predictions. In line with expectations, the Self-Identities Match slope is steepest and significantly negative (B = -0.029, SE = 0.005, t (8781) = 5.89, p < .0001). So, the more religion is self-defining for an individual, the quicker they responded to traits that overlap across all three identities. Notably, the Self—Religious Identity Match slope was also significantly quicker (B = -0.024, SE = 0.008, t (8781) = 3.00, p < .05). However, no significant effect of Self—Gender Identity Match was found.

Bottom Line: We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life.Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life).We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
It can be hard for individuals to manage multiple group identities within their self-concept (e.g., being a Christian and a woman). We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life). In three studies we investigated the inter-identity fit between individuals' (highly holistic) religious identity and (less holistic) gender identity. Results provided converging support for our hypothesis across diverging methods (explicit questionnaires, more implicit associations, and a novel network analysis of group traits). We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus