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Achieving Harmony among Different Social Identities within the Self-Concept: The Consequences of Internalising a Group-Based Philosophy of Life.

Turner-Zwinkels FM, Postmes T, van Zomeren M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life.Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life).We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
It can be hard for individuals to manage multiple group identities within their self-concept (e.g., being a Christian and a woman). We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life). In three studies we investigated the inter-identity fit between individuals' (highly holistic) religious identity and (less holistic) gender identity. Results provided converging support for our hypothesis across diverging methods (explicit questionnaires, more implicit associations, and a novel network analysis of group traits). We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

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Mean perceived holisticness and self-definingness of Gender, Nationality, Christianity, Healthy-Living and Environment.
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pone.0137879.g001: Mean perceived holisticness and self-definingness of Gender, Nationality, Christianity, Healthy-Living and Environment.

Mentions: In order to select the most suitable identities for further investigation in Studies 1–3, holisticness and self-definingness means were inspected for each group (see Fig 1). A repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA; with Greenhouse-Geisser degrees of freedom due to a sphericity violation; W (9) = .43, p < .001) showed that Gender and Nationality were perceived to be less holistic than Christianity, Healthy-living and Environmental groups (F (2.96, 334.79) = 27.03, p < .000001, ηp2 = .19). Bonferroni corrected pairwise contrasts confirmed that Gender and Nationality were significantly less holistic than all three other groups. Furthermore, Nationality occupied an intermediate position, in that it also differed significantly from Gender. RM-ANOVAs (with Greenhouse-Geisser degrees of freedom due to a sphericity violation; W (9) = .46, p < .001) on self-definingness revealed some significant differences between groups (F (2.79, 315.66) = 3.68, p < .01, ηp2 = .03), although effects were much less strong. Bonferroni corrected pairwise contrasts revealed that Gender and Healthy-living groups were experienced as significantly more self-defining than Christianity, but no further differences were found.


Achieving Harmony among Different Social Identities within the Self-Concept: The Consequences of Internalising a Group-Based Philosophy of Life.

Turner-Zwinkels FM, Postmes T, van Zomeren M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean perceived holisticness and self-definingness of Gender, Nationality, Christianity, Healthy-Living and Environment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664279&req=5

pone.0137879.g001: Mean perceived holisticness and self-definingness of Gender, Nationality, Christianity, Healthy-Living and Environment.
Mentions: In order to select the most suitable identities for further investigation in Studies 1–3, holisticness and self-definingness means were inspected for each group (see Fig 1). A repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA; with Greenhouse-Geisser degrees of freedom due to a sphericity violation; W (9) = .43, p < .001) showed that Gender and Nationality were perceived to be less holistic than Christianity, Healthy-living and Environmental groups (F (2.96, 334.79) = 27.03, p < .000001, ηp2 = .19). Bonferroni corrected pairwise contrasts confirmed that Gender and Nationality were significantly less holistic than all three other groups. Furthermore, Nationality occupied an intermediate position, in that it also differed significantly from Gender. RM-ANOVAs (with Greenhouse-Geisser degrees of freedom due to a sphericity violation; W (9) = .46, p < .001) on self-definingness revealed some significant differences between groups (F (2.79, 315.66) = 3.68, p < .01, ηp2 = .03), although effects were much less strong. Bonferroni corrected pairwise contrasts revealed that Gender and Healthy-living groups were experienced as significantly more self-defining than Christianity, but no further differences were found.

Bottom Line: We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life.Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life).We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
It can be hard for individuals to manage multiple group identities within their self-concept (e.g., being a Christian and a woman). We examine how the inter-identity fit between potentially conflicting identities can become more harmonious through a self-defining group philosophy for life. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that holistic group identities (based in group philosophies for life that prescribe the behavior of their members in any situation, such as religion) become more strongly related to other identities in the self-concept (e.g., gender) when they are strongly self-defining (i.e., devotedly applied to daily life). In three studies we investigated the inter-identity fit between individuals' (highly holistic) religious identity and (less holistic) gender identity. Results provided converging support for our hypothesis across diverging methods (explicit questionnaires, more implicit associations, and a novel network analysis of group traits). We discuss the importance of understanding how some (i.e., holistic and self-defining) group identities may harmonize otherwise less harmonious group identities within one's self-concept.

Show MeSH