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A Prospective Study of Fatty Liver Index and Incident Hypertension: The KoGES-ARIRANG Study.

Huh JH, Ahn SV, Koh SB, Choi E, Kim JY, Sung KC, Kim EJ, Park JB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Prospective cohort study of 1,521 adults (484 men and 1037 women) aged 40 to 70 years without baseline hypertension examined.During an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 153 subjects (10.06%) developed hypertension.After adjustment for confounding factors, including markers of insulin resistance, systemic inflammation and adiponectin levels, the odds ratio [95% confidence interval] for the incident hypertension increased in a graded manner with fatty liver index (<30 vs. 30-59 vs. ≥ 60 = 1 vs. 1.83 [1.16~2.88] vs. 2.09 [1.08~4.055], respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, its influence on hypertension development is poorly understood. We investigated whether fatty liver disease, as assessed by the fatty liver index, could predict the development of hypertension independently of systemic insulin resistance, inflammatory status and adipokine levels.

Methods: Prospective cohort study of 1,521 adults (484 men and 1037 women) aged 40 to 70 years without baseline hypertension examined. An equation was used to calculate fatty liver index and classify patients as follows: fatty liver index <30, no non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; fatty liver index ≥ 60, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; and 30 ≤ fatty liver index <60, intermediate fatty liver index.

Results: During an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 153 subjects (10.06%) developed hypertension. Fatty liver index was positively associated with baseline blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, urinary albumin/creatinine excretion, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. After adjustment for confounding factors, including markers of insulin resistance, systemic inflammation and adiponectin levels, the odds ratio [95% confidence interval] for the incident hypertension increased in a graded manner with fatty liver index (<30 vs. 30-59 vs. ≥ 60 = 1 vs. 1.83 [1.16~2.88] vs. 2.09 [1.08~4.055], respectively).

Conclusions: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessed by fatty liver index was an independent risk factor for hypertension. Our findings suggest that fatty liver index, a simple surrogate indicator of fatty liver disease, might be useful for identifying subjects at high risk for incident hypertension in clinical practice.

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Description of the study populations.
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pone.0143560.g001: Description of the study populations.

Mentions: We used data from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population (KoGES-ARIRANG), a population-based prospective cohort study, to assess the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for chronic degenerative disorders such as hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease [16, 17]. KoGES-ARIRANG invited all adults in rural areas of Wonju and Pyengchang in South Korea, where demographic shifts are infrequent and the population can be followed long term, to participate in the study. The baseline survey, carried out from November 2005 to January 2008, included 5178 adults (2127 men and 3051 women) aged 40–70 years. All study participants were invited to the first follow-up survey (April 2008 to January 2011) and 3862 (74.6%) attended. Subjects with missing data for the FLI (N = 8) and hypertension (N = 2) were excluded. We also excluded subjects who had a history of hypertension (N = 2108) or overt cardiovascular disease (N = 26) at baseline or excessive alcohol intake (alcohol consumption >140 g/week for men and 70 g/week for women) (N = 197). Finally, 1521 participants (484 men and 1037 women) were included in the analysis (Fig 1).


A Prospective Study of Fatty Liver Index and Incident Hypertension: The KoGES-ARIRANG Study.

Huh JH, Ahn SV, Koh SB, Choi E, Kim JY, Sung KC, Kim EJ, Park JB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Description of the study populations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664241&req=5

pone.0143560.g001: Description of the study populations.
Mentions: We used data from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population (KoGES-ARIRANG), a population-based prospective cohort study, to assess the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors for chronic degenerative disorders such as hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease [16, 17]. KoGES-ARIRANG invited all adults in rural areas of Wonju and Pyengchang in South Korea, where demographic shifts are infrequent and the population can be followed long term, to participate in the study. The baseline survey, carried out from November 2005 to January 2008, included 5178 adults (2127 men and 3051 women) aged 40–70 years. All study participants were invited to the first follow-up survey (April 2008 to January 2011) and 3862 (74.6%) attended. Subjects with missing data for the FLI (N = 8) and hypertension (N = 2) were excluded. We also excluded subjects who had a history of hypertension (N = 2108) or overt cardiovascular disease (N = 26) at baseline or excessive alcohol intake (alcohol consumption >140 g/week for men and 70 g/week for women) (N = 197). Finally, 1521 participants (484 men and 1037 women) were included in the analysis (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: Prospective cohort study of 1,521 adults (484 men and 1037 women) aged 40 to 70 years without baseline hypertension examined.During an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 153 subjects (10.06%) developed hypertension.After adjustment for confounding factors, including markers of insulin resistance, systemic inflammation and adiponectin levels, the odds ratio [95% confidence interval] for the incident hypertension increased in a graded manner with fatty liver index (<30 vs. 30-59 vs. ≥ 60 = 1 vs. 1.83 [1.16~2.88] vs. 2.09 [1.08~4.055], respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, its influence on hypertension development is poorly understood. We investigated whether fatty liver disease, as assessed by the fatty liver index, could predict the development of hypertension independently of systemic insulin resistance, inflammatory status and adipokine levels.

Methods: Prospective cohort study of 1,521 adults (484 men and 1037 women) aged 40 to 70 years without baseline hypertension examined. An equation was used to calculate fatty liver index and classify patients as follows: fatty liver index <30, no non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; fatty liver index ≥ 60, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; and 30 ≤ fatty liver index <60, intermediate fatty liver index.

Results: During an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 153 subjects (10.06%) developed hypertension. Fatty liver index was positively associated with baseline blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, urinary albumin/creatinine excretion, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. After adjustment for confounding factors, including markers of insulin resistance, systemic inflammation and adiponectin levels, the odds ratio [95% confidence interval] for the incident hypertension increased in a graded manner with fatty liver index (<30 vs. 30-59 vs. ≥ 60 = 1 vs. 1.83 [1.16~2.88] vs. 2.09 [1.08~4.055], respectively).

Conclusions: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessed by fatty liver index was an independent risk factor for hypertension. Our findings suggest that fatty liver index, a simple surrogate indicator of fatty liver disease, might be useful for identifying subjects at high risk for incident hypertension in clinical practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus