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The Structure of Co-Occurring Bullying Experiences and Associations with Suicidal Behaviors in Korean Adolescents.

Roh BR, Yoon Y, Kwon A, Oh S, Lee SI, Ha K, Shin YM, Song J, Park EJ, Yoo H, Hong HJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This study used data gathered from 4,410 treatment-seeking adolescents at their initial visits to 31 local mental health centers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea.Then, a binomial logistic regression adjusted by propensity scores was conducted to identify relationships between experiences of being bullied and suicidal behaviors.Both physical and non-physical bullying were associated with suicide attempts, with similar effect sizes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Suicide and School Mental Health Institute, Anyang, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study had two main goals: to examine the structure of co-occurring peer bullying experiences among adolescents in South Korea from the perspective of victims and to determine the effects of bullying on suicidal behavior, including suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, among adolescents.

Method: This study used data gathered from 4,410 treatment-seeking adolescents at their initial visits to 31 local mental health centers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. The structure of peer bullying was examined using latent class analysis (LCA) to classify participants' relevant experiences. Then, a binomial logistic regression adjusted by propensity scores was conducted to identify relationships between experiences of being bullied and suicidal behaviors.

Results: The LCA of experiences with bullying revealed two distinct classes of bullying: physical and non-physical. Adolescents who experienced physical bullying were 3.05 times more likely to attempt suicide than those who were not bullied. Victims of (non-physical) cyber bullying were 2.94 times more likely to attempt suicide than were those who were not bullied.

Conclusions: Both physical and non-physical bullying were associated with suicide attempts, with similar effect sizes. Schools and mental health professionals should be more attentive than they currently are to non-physical bullying.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Scree plot of AIC and BIC.
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pone.0143517.g001: Scree plot of AIC and BIC.

Mentions: Fig 1 represents a scree plot displaying AIC and BIC values for the LCA models. The scree plot shows differences in AIC and BIC values according to the number of classes of bullying experienced. The dotted line indicates changes in BIC, and the solid line indicates changes in AIC. Largest declines in the BIC or AIC is usually used as optimal model selection criteria. Two-class solution of majority of non-experienced (92.7%) and experienced (7.3%) was the largest decline in the BIC and AIC. However, we chose an alternative solution that includes more detailed bullying classes to properly classify bullied experiences. The two indicators show slightly different results. According to the BIC, the lowest value indicates that a three-class solution had the best fit and the four-class solution had even better model fit according to the AIC. Therefore, we chose the three-class solution considering the simplicity.


The Structure of Co-Occurring Bullying Experiences and Associations with Suicidal Behaviors in Korean Adolescents.

Roh BR, Yoon Y, Kwon A, Oh S, Lee SI, Ha K, Shin YM, Song J, Park EJ, Yoo H, Hong HJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Scree plot of AIC and BIC.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664235&req=5

pone.0143517.g001: Scree plot of AIC and BIC.
Mentions: Fig 1 represents a scree plot displaying AIC and BIC values for the LCA models. The scree plot shows differences in AIC and BIC values according to the number of classes of bullying experienced. The dotted line indicates changes in BIC, and the solid line indicates changes in AIC. Largest declines in the BIC or AIC is usually used as optimal model selection criteria. Two-class solution of majority of non-experienced (92.7%) and experienced (7.3%) was the largest decline in the BIC and AIC. However, we chose an alternative solution that includes more detailed bullying classes to properly classify bullied experiences. The two indicators show slightly different results. According to the BIC, the lowest value indicates that a three-class solution had the best fit and the four-class solution had even better model fit according to the AIC. Therefore, we chose the three-class solution considering the simplicity.

Bottom Line: This study used data gathered from 4,410 treatment-seeking adolescents at their initial visits to 31 local mental health centers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea.Then, a binomial logistic regression adjusted by propensity scores was conducted to identify relationships between experiences of being bullied and suicidal behaviors.Both physical and non-physical bullying were associated with suicide attempts, with similar effect sizes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Suicide and School Mental Health Institute, Anyang, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study had two main goals: to examine the structure of co-occurring peer bullying experiences among adolescents in South Korea from the perspective of victims and to determine the effects of bullying on suicidal behavior, including suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, among adolescents.

Method: This study used data gathered from 4,410 treatment-seeking adolescents at their initial visits to 31 local mental health centers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. The structure of peer bullying was examined using latent class analysis (LCA) to classify participants' relevant experiences. Then, a binomial logistic regression adjusted by propensity scores was conducted to identify relationships between experiences of being bullied and suicidal behaviors.

Results: The LCA of experiences with bullying revealed two distinct classes of bullying: physical and non-physical. Adolescents who experienced physical bullying were 3.05 times more likely to attempt suicide than those who were not bullied. Victims of (non-physical) cyber bullying were 2.94 times more likely to attempt suicide than were those who were not bullied.

Conclusions: Both physical and non-physical bullying were associated with suicide attempts, with similar effect sizes. Schools and mental health professionals should be more attentive than they currently are to non-physical bullying.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus