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Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices.

Woeller KE, Miller KW, Robertson-Smith AL, Bohman LC - Clin Med Insights Womens Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls.No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Product Stewardship, Feminine Care Business Unit, The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens.

Methods: (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14-49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18-49 years, 74 teens, 12-17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising.

Results: Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).

Conclusions: Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits.

No MeSH data available.


Tampon absorbency choices from diary surveys conducted prior to and after the launch of advertising with a message that tampons can be used at night for up to eight hours.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f3-cmwh-8-2015-029: Tampon absorbency choices from diary surveys conducted prior to and after the launch of advertising with a message that tampons can be used at night for up to eight hours.

Mentions: Tampon absorbency choices were comparable between studies overall (Fig. 3). No significant differences in mean wear time by absorbency were observed either for the total study population (Table 5) or for adults. However, among teens, there were no uses of ultra absorbency tampons in the baseline study, but eight uses were found in the follow-up study. These eight uses occurred in just two teens (1.9% of the sample). One teen used a single ultra absorbent tampon for 8.5 hours between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. (not overnight). The remaining seven uses were attributed to one 15-year old teen: she used ultra absorbency tampons exclusively and, with the exception of a single pad use, did not alternate tampons with other feminine hygiene products. She provided incomplete documentation, but used tampons for over eight hours in five of seven documented uses, including once overnight. This young woman has adopted habits inconsistent with product labeling and product leaflet information.


Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices.

Woeller KE, Miller KW, Robertson-Smith AL, Bohman LC - Clin Med Insights Womens Health (2015)

Tampon absorbency choices from diary surveys conducted prior to and after the launch of advertising with a message that tampons can be used at night for up to eight hours.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664207&req=5

f3-cmwh-8-2015-029: Tampon absorbency choices from diary surveys conducted prior to and after the launch of advertising with a message that tampons can be used at night for up to eight hours.
Mentions: Tampon absorbency choices were comparable between studies overall (Fig. 3). No significant differences in mean wear time by absorbency were observed either for the total study population (Table 5) or for adults. However, among teens, there were no uses of ultra absorbency tampons in the baseline study, but eight uses were found in the follow-up study. These eight uses occurred in just two teens (1.9% of the sample). One teen used a single ultra absorbent tampon for 8.5 hours between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. (not overnight). The remaining seven uses were attributed to one 15-year old teen: she used ultra absorbency tampons exclusively and, with the exception of a single pad use, did not alternate tampons with other feminine hygiene products. She provided incomplete documentation, but used tampons for over eight hours in five of seven documented uses, including once overnight. This young woman has adopted habits inconsistent with product labeling and product leaflet information.

Bottom Line: Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls.No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Product Stewardship, Feminine Care Business Unit, The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens.

Methods: (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14-49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18-49 years, 74 teens, 12-17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising.

Results: Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).

Conclusions: Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits.

No MeSH data available.