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Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices.

Woeller KE, Miller KW, Robertson-Smith AL, Bohman LC - Clin Med Insights Womens Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls.No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Product Stewardship, Feminine Care Business Unit, The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens.

Methods: (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14-49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18-49 years, 74 teens, 12-17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising.

Results: Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).

Conclusions: Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Advertising comprehension study comparing two messages. (A) Wear-time message: Protection for up to 8 hours, even at night (test). (B) Product performance message: Fluid absorbency and leakage protection (control)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f2-cmwh-8-2015-029: Advertising comprehension study comparing two messages. (A) Wear-time message: Protection for up to 8 hours, even at night (test). (B) Product performance message: Fluid absorbency and leakage protection (control)

Mentions: A television and print advertising initiative for Tampax® tampons was developed to communicate that tampons can be worn at night for up to eight hours. It was similar to previous initiatives in terms of media outlets, number of advertisements, length of the initiative, and target audience and was specifically aimed at adults. Television and print advertising featured a woman asleep at night; superimposed upon the scene was a time-clock image denoting a tampon wear time of up to eight hours and subtext stating one should use a pad if planning to sleep more than eight hours. For television advertisement, the “up-to-eight-hour” wear-time message was stated orally and the superimposed time-clock image appeared dominant within the advertisement (Fig. 2). This advertising excluded teen models or a young teen theme so as not to contradict the recommendation that teenagers need 8–9.5 hours of sleep at night.18,19 The television initiative ran from March 2009 through November 2009. Advertisements were placed during 20 television shows on 20 networks at a time when an adult audience would be watching and was estimated to have reached about 60% of women aged 18–34 per week; although the advertising placement and content was not explicitly aimed at teenagers, it is estimated that the advertising would have reached a similar proportion of teens. Print advertisements were placed in 21 magazines for adult readers. These advertisements ran from April 2009 to January 2010 and were targeted to reach 60% of adult women per week aged 18–34 both nationally and in the Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio, region where diary surveys of tampon practices were carried out as part of this research. According to Media Effectiveness Tracking Tests conducted by our company, it is estimated that the combination of television and print advertising may have reached over 90% of women in aggregate over the nine months of the advertising campaign.


Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices.

Woeller KE, Miller KW, Robertson-Smith AL, Bohman LC - Clin Med Insights Womens Health (2015)

Advertising comprehension study comparing two messages. (A) Wear-time message: Protection for up to 8 hours, even at night (test). (B) Product performance message: Fluid absorbency and leakage protection (control)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664207&req=5

f2-cmwh-8-2015-029: Advertising comprehension study comparing two messages. (A) Wear-time message: Protection for up to 8 hours, even at night (test). (B) Product performance message: Fluid absorbency and leakage protection (control)
Mentions: A television and print advertising initiative for Tampax® tampons was developed to communicate that tampons can be worn at night for up to eight hours. It was similar to previous initiatives in terms of media outlets, number of advertisements, length of the initiative, and target audience and was specifically aimed at adults. Television and print advertising featured a woman asleep at night; superimposed upon the scene was a time-clock image denoting a tampon wear time of up to eight hours and subtext stating one should use a pad if planning to sleep more than eight hours. For television advertisement, the “up-to-eight-hour” wear-time message was stated orally and the superimposed time-clock image appeared dominant within the advertisement (Fig. 2). This advertising excluded teen models or a young teen theme so as not to contradict the recommendation that teenagers need 8–9.5 hours of sleep at night.18,19 The television initiative ran from March 2009 through November 2009. Advertisements were placed during 20 television shows on 20 networks at a time when an adult audience would be watching and was estimated to have reached about 60% of women aged 18–34 per week; although the advertising placement and content was not explicitly aimed at teenagers, it is estimated that the advertising would have reached a similar proportion of teens. Print advertisements were placed in 21 magazines for adult readers. These advertisements ran from April 2009 to January 2010 and were targeted to reach 60% of adult women per week aged 18–34 both nationally and in the Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio, region where diary surveys of tampon practices were carried out as part of this research. According to Media Effectiveness Tracking Tests conducted by our company, it is estimated that the combination of television and print advertising may have reached over 90% of women in aggregate over the nine months of the advertising campaign.

Bottom Line: Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls.No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Product Stewardship, Feminine Care Business Unit, The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens.

Methods: (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14-49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18-49 years, 74 teens, 12-17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising.

Results: Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours).

Conclusions: Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus