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Differences in the burden of psychiatric comorbidity in MS vs the general population.

Marrie RA, Fisk JD, Tremlett H, Wolfson C, Warren S, Tennakoon A, Leung S, Patten SB, CIHR Team in the Epidemiology and Impact of Comorbidity on Multiple Scleros - Neurology (2015)

Bottom Line: We pooled the results across provinces using meta-analyses.Psychiatric comorbidity is common in MS, and more frequently affected the MS population than a matched population, although the incidence was stable over time.Men with MS face a disproportionately greater relative burden of depression when they develop MS than women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Departments of Internal Medicine (R.A.M.) and Community Health Sciences (R.A.M., S.L.), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine (J.D.F.), Dalhousie University, Halifax; Department of Medicine (Neurology) (H.T.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational Health (C.W.), McGill University, Montreal; Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine (S.W.), University of Alberta, Edmonton; and Department of Community Health Sciences (S.B.P.), University of Calgary, Canada. rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plots of the association of the incidence of psychiatric comorbidity with study population (multiple sclerosis vs matched)BC = British Columbia; CI = confidence interval; MB = Manitoba; NS = Nova Scotia; QC = Quebec.
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Figure 1: Forest plots of the association of the incidence of psychiatric comorbidity with study population (multiple sclerosis vs matched)BC = British Columbia; CI = confidence interval; MB = Manitoba; NS = Nova Scotia; QC = Quebec.

Mentions: In 2005, the crude incidence (95% CI) of depression in the MS population was 979 per 100,000 persons or 0.98% (0.81%–1.15%, figure e-1) overall (0.94%, 0.80%–1.08% in women; 1.02%, 0.78%–1.25% in men), while it was 0.72% (0.67%–0.76%) in the matched population (figure e-2). Adjusting for year and sex, the age-standardized incidence of depression was 71% higher in the MS population than in the matched population (table 1, figure 1). The incidence of depression was higher in women than in men but was stable over time.


Differences in the burden of psychiatric comorbidity in MS vs the general population.

Marrie RA, Fisk JD, Tremlett H, Wolfson C, Warren S, Tennakoon A, Leung S, Patten SB, CIHR Team in the Epidemiology and Impact of Comorbidity on Multiple Scleros - Neurology (2015)

Forest plots of the association of the incidence of psychiatric comorbidity with study population (multiple sclerosis vs matched)BC = British Columbia; CI = confidence interval; MB = Manitoba; NS = Nova Scotia; QC = Quebec.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664123&req=5

Figure 1: Forest plots of the association of the incidence of psychiatric comorbidity with study population (multiple sclerosis vs matched)BC = British Columbia; CI = confidence interval; MB = Manitoba; NS = Nova Scotia; QC = Quebec.
Mentions: In 2005, the crude incidence (95% CI) of depression in the MS population was 979 per 100,000 persons or 0.98% (0.81%–1.15%, figure e-1) overall (0.94%, 0.80%–1.08% in women; 1.02%, 0.78%–1.25% in men), while it was 0.72% (0.67%–0.76%) in the matched population (figure e-2). Adjusting for year and sex, the age-standardized incidence of depression was 71% higher in the MS population than in the matched population (table 1, figure 1). The incidence of depression was higher in women than in men but was stable over time.

Bottom Line: We pooled the results across provinces using meta-analyses.Psychiatric comorbidity is common in MS, and more frequently affected the MS population than a matched population, although the incidence was stable over time.Men with MS face a disproportionately greater relative burden of depression when they develop MS than women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the Departments of Internal Medicine (R.A.M.) and Community Health Sciences (R.A.M., S.L.), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine (J.D.F.), Dalhousie University, Halifax; Department of Medicine (Neurology) (H.T.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational Health (C.W.), McGill University, Montreal; Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine (S.W.), University of Alberta, Edmonton; and Department of Community Health Sciences (S.B.P.), University of Calgary, Canada. rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus