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Effects of eating rate on satiety: A role for episodic memory?

Ferriday D, Bosworth ML, Lai S, Godinot N, Martin N, Martin AA, Rogers PJ, Brunstrom JM - Physiol. Behav. (2015)

Bottom Line: However, we found little effect of eating rate on subsequent ad libitum snack intake.However, eating slowly did not affect ratings of memory vividness and we found little evidence for a relationship between episodic memory and satiety.Therefore, we are unable to conclude that episodic memory mediates effects of eating rate on satiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK. Electronic address: danielle.ferriday@bristol.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean (± S.E.M.) change in fullness composite scores (panel a) and thirst ratings (panel b) immediately after lunch, at 120 min (before the taste test), and at 190 min (after the taste test). Results are reported separately for the fast and slow eating conditions. The dotted horizontal line represents rated appetite or thirst before consuming the soup (baseline).
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f0010: Mean (± S.E.M.) change in fullness composite scores (panel a) and thirst ratings (panel b) immediately after lunch, at 120 min (before the taste test), and at 190 min (after the taste test). Results are reported separately for the fast and slow eating conditions. The dotted horizontal line represents rated appetite or thirst before consuming the soup (baseline).

Mentions: Immediately after eating the soup, participants who consumed it at the slow rate reported a significantly greater change in fullness from baseline (F(1, 36) = 6.28, p = .02; see Fig. 2). There were no significant differences in change in thirst from baseline (F(1, 36) = 0.06, p = .81; see Fig. 2) or any of the MAPS ratings between conditions (all p ≥ .05; see Table 2), with the exception of strangeness; participants in the fast condition reported greater strangeness at the end of the meal (F(1, 33) = 4.67, p = .04).


Effects of eating rate on satiety: A role for episodic memory?

Ferriday D, Bosworth ML, Lai S, Godinot N, Martin N, Martin AA, Rogers PJ, Brunstrom JM - Physiol. Behav. (2015)

Mean (± S.E.M.) change in fullness composite scores (panel a) and thirst ratings (panel b) immediately after lunch, at 120 min (before the taste test), and at 190 min (after the taste test). Results are reported separately for the fast and slow eating conditions. The dotted horizontal line represents rated appetite or thirst before consuming the soup (baseline).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664113&req=5

f0010: Mean (± S.E.M.) change in fullness composite scores (panel a) and thirst ratings (panel b) immediately after lunch, at 120 min (before the taste test), and at 190 min (after the taste test). Results are reported separately for the fast and slow eating conditions. The dotted horizontal line represents rated appetite or thirst before consuming the soup (baseline).
Mentions: Immediately after eating the soup, participants who consumed it at the slow rate reported a significantly greater change in fullness from baseline (F(1, 36) = 6.28, p = .02; see Fig. 2). There were no significant differences in change in thirst from baseline (F(1, 36) = 0.06, p = .81; see Fig. 2) or any of the MAPS ratings between conditions (all p ≥ .05; see Table 2), with the exception of strangeness; participants in the fast condition reported greater strangeness at the end of the meal (F(1, 33) = 4.67, p = .04).

Bottom Line: However, we found little effect of eating rate on subsequent ad libitum snack intake.However, eating slowly did not affect ratings of memory vividness and we found little evidence for a relationship between episodic memory and satiety.Therefore, we are unable to conclude that episodic memory mediates effects of eating rate on satiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK. Electronic address: danielle.ferriday@bristol.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus