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Effects of eating rate on satiety: A role for episodic memory?

Ferriday D, Bosworth ML, Lai S, Godinot N, Martin N, Martin AA, Rogers PJ, Brunstrom JM - Physiol. Behav. (2015)

Bottom Line: However, we found little effect of eating rate on subsequent ad libitum snack intake.However, eating slowly did not affect ratings of memory vividness and we found little evidence for a relationship between episodic memory and satiety.Therefore, we are unable to conclude that episodic memory mediates effects of eating rate on satiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK. Electronic address: danielle.ferriday@bristol.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


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Mentions: Participants consumed a warm tomato soup for lunch (Sainsbury's Supermarkets Ltd, London, U.K.; 59 kcal per 100 ml). Soup was chosen as a test meal because it is at least as satiating as solid foods [37], [38], [39]. To manipulate oral processing, we used a technique that has been employed previously to investigate the effects of sip size and eating rate on ad libitum intake [40], [41]. Specifically, the soup was consumed through a temperature-insulated food-grade tube. Participants sat at a table covered by a table cloth. A tall screen was positioned to the left of the participant. The tubing connected to a reservoir of soup (600 ml) via a peristaltic pump (Watson-Marlow, type 323 Du). See Fig. 1 for a depiction of the experimental set-up. Throughout the experiment, the volunteers were unable to see either the pump or the reservoir. Participants were informed that they would be consuming their lunch through a tube because “…people differ in their eating rate, which has been shown to affect people's appetite” and that we were using the pump “…so that everyone eats at the same rate and we can rule out differences that might affect the results.” Each participant consumed 400 ml of soup and the time taken to consume the meal was recorded by the experimenter. To ensure that any effects of eating rate could not be attributed to differences in water intake during the meal [42], participants were given a fixed amount of water with their meal (250 ml) and water intake (g) was recorded.


Effects of eating rate on satiety: A role for episodic memory?

Ferriday D, Bosworth ML, Lai S, Godinot N, Martin N, Martin AA, Rogers PJ, Brunstrom JM - Physiol. Behav. (2015)

Depiction of the experimental set-up.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664113&req=5

f0005: Depiction of the experimental set-up.
Mentions: Participants consumed a warm tomato soup for lunch (Sainsbury's Supermarkets Ltd, London, U.K.; 59 kcal per 100 ml). Soup was chosen as a test meal because it is at least as satiating as solid foods [37], [38], [39]. To manipulate oral processing, we used a technique that has been employed previously to investigate the effects of sip size and eating rate on ad libitum intake [40], [41]. Specifically, the soup was consumed through a temperature-insulated food-grade tube. Participants sat at a table covered by a table cloth. A tall screen was positioned to the left of the participant. The tubing connected to a reservoir of soup (600 ml) via a peristaltic pump (Watson-Marlow, type 323 Du). See Fig. 1 for a depiction of the experimental set-up. Throughout the experiment, the volunteers were unable to see either the pump or the reservoir. Participants were informed that they would be consuming their lunch through a tube because “…people differ in their eating rate, which has been shown to affect people's appetite” and that we were using the pump “…so that everyone eats at the same rate and we can rule out differences that might affect the results.” Each participant consumed 400 ml of soup and the time taken to consume the meal was recorded by the experimenter. To ensure that any effects of eating rate could not be attributed to differences in water intake during the meal [42], participants were given a fixed amount of water with their meal (250 ml) and water intake (g) was recorded.

Bottom Line: However, we found little effect of eating rate on subsequent ad libitum snack intake.However, eating slowly did not affect ratings of memory vividness and we found little evidence for a relationship between episodic memory and satiety.Therefore, we are unable to conclude that episodic memory mediates effects of eating rate on satiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutrition and Behaviour Unit, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK. Electronic address: danielle.ferriday@bristol.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.