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The Feasibility of Ultrasonography in Defining the Size of Jaw Osseous Lesions.

Shahidi S, Shakibafard A, Zamiri B, Mokhtare MR, Houshyar M, Mahdian S - J Dent (Shiraz) (2015)

Bottom Line: The size of the lesions was measured by USG and then compared with CT or CBCT.Moreover, the correlation amongst the echographic patterns and histopathologic results was evaluated.Findings of this study suggested that USG might be feasible in estimating the size of intra-osseous jaw lesions with little underestimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomaterial Research Center, Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Statement of the problem: Jaw bone lesions are common pathologic conditions. The role of ultrasonography in evaluation of the extra-osseous lesions is confirmed, however, this imaging modality is not the diagnostic routine for the intra-osseous jaw lesions.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of ultrasonography in diagnosis of intra-osseous jaw lesions concerning their size and content and also to study its correlation with the histopathological findings.

Materials and method: For this study, 15 patients with intra-osseous jaw lesions in the maxilla and mandible were selected from those referred to the Department of Oral Surgery. Panoramic imaging, computed tomography (CT) or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and ultrasonography (USG) were performed for all the lesions. The size of the lesions was measured by USG and then compared with CT or CBCT. Moreover, the correlation amongst the echographic patterns and histopathologic results was evaluated.

Results: In 12 cases, size values were in complete agreement with CT or CBCT. The size of 3 lesions could not be measured by the radiologist due to the thickness of buccal cortical plate.

Conclusion: Findings of this study suggested that USG might be feasible in estimating the size of intra-osseous jaw lesions with little underestimation. This study also confirmed that ultrasound imaging was a very useful imaging technique which could provide significant diagnostic information regarding the content of jaw bone lesions where the buccal bone thickness was thin enough.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A case of ameloblastoma. (A) Panoramic view reveals large radiolucent lesion in right mandibular ramus. (B) CBCT shows large lytic lesion in right ramus. (C) Ultrasound image shows a hyperechoic lesion.
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Figure 3: A case of ameloblastoma. (A) Panoramic view reveals large radiolucent lesion in right mandibular ramus. (B) CBCT shows large lytic lesion in right ramus. (C) Ultrasound image shows a hyperechoic lesion.

Mentions: A hyperechoic area has higher echo intensity (demonstrates more reflected echoes) than the surrounding tissues, and it almost always indicates solid content. Three lesions which revealed a hyperechoic pattern were ameloblastoma, mural ameloblastoma, and Pindborg tumor (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor). These tumors had a solid content which was consistent with their histopathologic results (Figure 3).


The Feasibility of Ultrasonography in Defining the Size of Jaw Osseous Lesions.

Shahidi S, Shakibafard A, Zamiri B, Mokhtare MR, Houshyar M, Mahdian S - J Dent (Shiraz) (2015)

A case of ameloblastoma. (A) Panoramic view reveals large radiolucent lesion in right mandibular ramus. (B) CBCT shows large lytic lesion in right ramus. (C) Ultrasound image shows a hyperechoic lesion.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664031&req=5

Figure 3: A case of ameloblastoma. (A) Panoramic view reveals large radiolucent lesion in right mandibular ramus. (B) CBCT shows large lytic lesion in right ramus. (C) Ultrasound image shows a hyperechoic lesion.
Mentions: A hyperechoic area has higher echo intensity (demonstrates more reflected echoes) than the surrounding tissues, and it almost always indicates solid content. Three lesions which revealed a hyperechoic pattern were ameloblastoma, mural ameloblastoma, and Pindborg tumor (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor). These tumors had a solid content which was consistent with their histopathologic results (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The size of the lesions was measured by USG and then compared with CT or CBCT.Moreover, the correlation amongst the echographic patterns and histopathologic results was evaluated.Findings of this study suggested that USG might be feasible in estimating the size of intra-osseous jaw lesions with little underestimation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomaterial Research Center, Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Statement of the problem: Jaw bone lesions are common pathologic conditions. The role of ultrasonography in evaluation of the extra-osseous lesions is confirmed, however, this imaging modality is not the diagnostic routine for the intra-osseous jaw lesions.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of ultrasonography in diagnosis of intra-osseous jaw lesions concerning their size and content and also to study its correlation with the histopathological findings.

Materials and method: For this study, 15 patients with intra-osseous jaw lesions in the maxilla and mandible were selected from those referred to the Department of Oral Surgery. Panoramic imaging, computed tomography (CT) or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and ultrasonography (USG) were performed for all the lesions. The size of the lesions was measured by USG and then compared with CT or CBCT. Moreover, the correlation amongst the echographic patterns and histopathologic results was evaluated.

Results: In 12 cases, size values were in complete agreement with CT or CBCT. The size of 3 lesions could not be measured by the radiologist due to the thickness of buccal cortical plate.

Conclusion: Findings of this study suggested that USG might be feasible in estimating the size of intra-osseous jaw lesions with little underestimation. This study also confirmed that ultrasound imaging was a very useful imaging technique which could provide significant diagnostic information regarding the content of jaw bone lesions where the buccal bone thickness was thin enough.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus