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The Effect of Aloe Vera, Pomegranate Peel, Grape Seed Extract, Green Tea, and Sodium Ascorbate as Antioxidants on the Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Home-bleached Enamel.

Sharafeddin F, Farshad F - J Dent (Shiraz) (2015)

Bottom Line: Sixty extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5×1.5 cm), with the coronal portion left out of the block.After bleaching the labial enamel surface with 15% carbamide peroxide, they were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10).No significant difference existed between the control and experimental groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomaterial Research Center, Dept. of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Statement of the problem: Immediate application of bonding agent to home- bleached enamel leads to significant reduction in the shear bond strength of composite resin due to the residual oxygen. Different antioxidant agents may overcome this problem.

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the effect of different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of composite resin to home-bleached.

Materials and method: Sixty extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5×1.5 cm), with the coronal portion left out of the block. After bleaching the labial enamel surface with 15% carbamide peroxide, they were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). Before performing composite resin restoration by using a cylindrical Teflon mold (5×2 mm), each group was treated with one of the following antioxidants: 10% sodium ascorbate solution, 10% pomegranate peel solution, 10% grape seed extract, 5% green tea extract, and aloe vera leaf gel. One group was left untreated as the control. The shear bond strength of samples was tested under a universal testing machine (ZwickRoell Z020). The shear bond strength data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05).

Results: No significant difference existed between the control and experimental groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference between the effects of different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of bleached enamel.

Conclusion: Different antioxidants used in this study had the same effect on the shear bond strength of home-bleached enamel, and none of them caused a statistically significant increase in its value.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The shear bond strength of the study groups. Groups: A (Control), B (Sodium ascorbate), C (Pomegranate peel), D (Grape seed extract), E (Green tea), F (Aloe vera).
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Figure 2: The shear bond strength of the study groups. Groups: A (Control), B (Sodium ascorbate), C (Pomegranate peel), D (Grape seed extract), E (Green tea), F (Aloe vera).

Mentions: ANOVA was used to analyze the differences between the mean SBS of study groups, and Tukey’s post-hoc test was used to determine the significant differences between the mean values of the groups. One-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant difference between the control group and groups treated with antioxidants (p< 0.05). Similar mean values were obtained from the groups treated by different antioxidants (Figure 2).


The Effect of Aloe Vera, Pomegranate Peel, Grape Seed Extract, Green Tea, and Sodium Ascorbate as Antioxidants on the Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Home-bleached Enamel.

Sharafeddin F, Farshad F - J Dent (Shiraz) (2015)

The shear bond strength of the study groups. Groups: A (Control), B (Sodium ascorbate), C (Pomegranate peel), D (Grape seed extract), E (Green tea), F (Aloe vera).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4664025&req=5

Figure 2: The shear bond strength of the study groups. Groups: A (Control), B (Sodium ascorbate), C (Pomegranate peel), D (Grape seed extract), E (Green tea), F (Aloe vera).
Mentions: ANOVA was used to analyze the differences between the mean SBS of study groups, and Tukey’s post-hoc test was used to determine the significant differences between the mean values of the groups. One-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant difference between the control group and groups treated with antioxidants (p< 0.05). Similar mean values were obtained from the groups treated by different antioxidants (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Sixty extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5×1.5 cm), with the coronal portion left out of the block.After bleaching the labial enamel surface with 15% carbamide peroxide, they were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10).No significant difference existed between the control and experimental groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomaterial Research Center, Dept. of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Statement of the problem: Immediate application of bonding agent to home- bleached enamel leads to significant reduction in the shear bond strength of composite resin due to the residual oxygen. Different antioxidant agents may overcome this problem.

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the effect of different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of composite resin to home-bleached.

Materials and method: Sixty extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5×1.5 cm), with the coronal portion left out of the block. After bleaching the labial enamel surface with 15% carbamide peroxide, they were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). Before performing composite resin restoration by using a cylindrical Teflon mold (5×2 mm), each group was treated with one of the following antioxidants: 10% sodium ascorbate solution, 10% pomegranate peel solution, 10% grape seed extract, 5% green tea extract, and aloe vera leaf gel. One group was left untreated as the control. The shear bond strength of samples was tested under a universal testing machine (ZwickRoell Z020). The shear bond strength data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05).

Results: No significant difference existed between the control and experimental groups. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference between the effects of different antioxidants on the shear bond strength of bleached enamel.

Conclusion: Different antioxidants used in this study had the same effect on the shear bond strength of home-bleached enamel, and none of them caused a statistically significant increase in its value.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus