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In Vitro Propagation, Phytochemical Analysis, and Evaluation of Free Radical Scavenging Property of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch Tissue Extracts.

Manivannan A, Soundararajan P, Park YG, Jeong BR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse.The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts.Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The current study deals with in vitro propagation, antioxidant property estimation, and assessment of acacetin content in Scrophularia kakudensis Franch. Adventitious shoot induction was achieved from the nodal explant with the highest number of adventitious shoots per explant (17.4) on Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium fortified with 2.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Maximum number of roots per plant (16.5) was noted in half strength MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg·L(-1) IAA. The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse. The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts. Total phenol and flavonoid contents along with free radical scavenging assays revealed the occurrence of larger amount of antioxidants in shoot extract in comparison with callus and root extracts of S. kakudensis. Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

DNA protection potential of in vitro tissues and commercial extracts. Lane 1: positive control (2 μg ascorbic acid + 50 ng DNA). Lane 2: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo shoot extract (SE). Lane 3: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo root extract (RE). Lane 4: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro shoot extract (ISE). Lane 5: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro root extract (IRE). Lane 6: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg callus extracts (CEs). Lane 7: negative control (20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA) of S. kakudensis. Oc: open circular form, Li: linear form, and Sc: supercoiled form of plasmid DNA.
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fig5: DNA protection potential of in vitro tissues and commercial extracts. Lane 1: positive control (2 μg ascorbic acid + 50 ng DNA). Lane 2: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo shoot extract (SE). Lane 3: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo root extract (RE). Lane 4: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro shoot extract (ISE). Lane 5: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro root extract (IRE). Lane 6: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg callus extracts (CEs). Lane 7: negative control (20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA) of S. kakudensis. Oc: open circular form, Li: linear form, and Sc: supercoiled form of plasmid DNA.

Mentions: The DNA strand scission assay illustrated the ability of all the extracts to render protection against the hydroxyl radicals induced DNA damage (Figure 5). During the strand nicking the plasmid DNA will be separated into open circular, linear, and supercoiled form. Based on the intensity of native supercoiled bands the DNA protection capacity was as evaluated and compared with the positive control ascorbic acid (lane 1). The supplementation of SE, RE ISE, IRE, and CE has protected the DNA from the H2O2 radicals (lanes 2–6). However the in vitro extracts (lanes 4–6) exhibited slightly increased DNA prevention activity compared to the in vivo extracts (lanes 2 and 3). In lane 7 the H2O2 without any extracts (negative control) induced complete breakage of DNA strands. The excess production of ROS oxidizes the nitrogen bases of the DNA molecules leading to the oxidative damage [22]. Therefore, it is necessary for an antioxidant to protect DNA from the ROS. Thus the extracts were proved to contain strong antioxidant capacity. Overall, the results demonstrated the strong antioxidant properties were attributed in the aerial part of S. kakudensis in comparison with the underground part.


In Vitro Propagation, Phytochemical Analysis, and Evaluation of Free Radical Scavenging Property of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch Tissue Extracts.

Manivannan A, Soundararajan P, Park YG, Jeong BR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

DNA protection potential of in vitro tissues and commercial extracts. Lane 1: positive control (2 μg ascorbic acid + 50 ng DNA). Lane 2: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo shoot extract (SE). Lane 3: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo root extract (RE). Lane 4: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro shoot extract (ISE). Lane 5: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro root extract (IRE). Lane 6: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg callus extracts (CEs). Lane 7: negative control (20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA) of S. kakudensis. Oc: open circular form, Li: linear form, and Sc: supercoiled form of plasmid DNA.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663745&req=5

fig5: DNA protection potential of in vitro tissues and commercial extracts. Lane 1: positive control (2 μg ascorbic acid + 50 ng DNA). Lane 2: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo shoot extract (SE). Lane 3: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vivo root extract (RE). Lane 4: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro shoot extract (ISE). Lane 5: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg in vitro root extract (IRE). Lane 6: 20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA + 2 μg callus extracts (CEs). Lane 7: negative control (20 mM H2O2 + 50 ng DNA) of S. kakudensis. Oc: open circular form, Li: linear form, and Sc: supercoiled form of plasmid DNA.
Mentions: The DNA strand scission assay illustrated the ability of all the extracts to render protection against the hydroxyl radicals induced DNA damage (Figure 5). During the strand nicking the plasmid DNA will be separated into open circular, linear, and supercoiled form. Based on the intensity of native supercoiled bands the DNA protection capacity was as evaluated and compared with the positive control ascorbic acid (lane 1). The supplementation of SE, RE ISE, IRE, and CE has protected the DNA from the H2O2 radicals (lanes 2–6). However the in vitro extracts (lanes 4–6) exhibited slightly increased DNA prevention activity compared to the in vivo extracts (lanes 2 and 3). In lane 7 the H2O2 without any extracts (negative control) induced complete breakage of DNA strands. The excess production of ROS oxidizes the nitrogen bases of the DNA molecules leading to the oxidative damage [22]. Therefore, it is necessary for an antioxidant to protect DNA from the ROS. Thus the extracts were proved to contain strong antioxidant capacity. Overall, the results demonstrated the strong antioxidant properties were attributed in the aerial part of S. kakudensis in comparison with the underground part.

Bottom Line: The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse.The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts.Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The current study deals with in vitro propagation, antioxidant property estimation, and assessment of acacetin content in Scrophularia kakudensis Franch. Adventitious shoot induction was achieved from the nodal explant with the highest number of adventitious shoots per explant (17.4) on Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium fortified with 2.0 mg·L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Maximum number of roots per plant (16.5) was noted in half strength MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg·L(-1) IAA. The regenerated plants displayed successful survival ratio (95%) in the greenhouse. The highest content of acacetin, a pharmaceutically important flavonoid, was observed in the shoot extracts (in vitro: 32.83 µg·g(-1) FW; in vivo: 30.05 µg·g(-1) FW) followed by root extracts. Total phenol and flavonoid contents along with free radical scavenging assays revealed the occurrence of larger amount of antioxidants in shoot extract in comparison with callus and root extracts of S. kakudensis. Thus, the outcome of the present study can be highly beneficial for the germplasm conservation and commercial cultivation of S. kakudensis for therapeutic purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus